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Topic: Uggghhhh...balloon animals....
Message: Posted by: Chad Sanborn (Nov 4, 2001 05:26PM)
I HATE balloon animals. I personally rarely make balloon animals. I see other people do it.



Its like... the kids want balloon animals... but in order to get one, they have to sit through some magic first. WHY>>>???? If itís the balloons they want, just make them and move on. Otherwise they see magic as the torture. A pain they must first endure to get what they want.



If a kid wantís a balloon animal from me, I say "You like ballon animals?" they of course say "yeahhh" so I give them some balloons and say "make em" The parents laugh. The kids look confused. Then start to whine a little. Then I say "ok..." and tie a knot in the end of the balloon. "Itís a worm". The parents again laugh and sometimes the kids chuckle.



If the kid persists, I say "look, are you paying for this meal?" "no..." they say. "Did you do anything to contribute to this meal.. drive here? cook? Pay for the gas?..." "nooo..." they say. "Then what gives you the right to complain about it?" The parents are usually hysterical at this point.



Then I usually ask the kid one more time,

"do you still want a balloon animal?"

they will sometimes say no... but usually its "yes" Then I take the íwormí and say "watch.... watch.... itís going to change... itís changing...." I bring out some scissors and cut off the ends "yes itís done. "What is it" they say, "a chameleon" I say. Many puzzled looks at this point. "It has just changed into a STRAW" I say as I drop it into the kids drink. The parents laugh hysterically again. The kids usually end up drinking through the balloon!!! kinda gross when you think about it..



Chad



_________________

[url=http://www.chadsanborn.com]seeing is believing[/url]
Message: Posted by: John Zander (Nov 4, 2001 06:08PM)
Hi Chad,



Please tell me you are kidding.... please. Sounds as if you hate your job. That sounds really cruel to me, honestly. Why in the world would you treat a child like that?



You are the one who said "Do you like balloon animals?" What is a child going to say? Yes.... of course yes. Same as if you said "Who likes candy?" I have worked a great many restaurants, family places and have never done a single balloon animal, and I have never been asked to do one.



If you do not like to do them, if you hate them, why in the world would you ask the children if they like them?



If you donít ask them then you would not have a problem and would not have to deal with them. From the beginning till the end of that "routine" you are teasing the child, if that is true and you think that is fun, then you are the wrong person for that job.



A balloon for a straw! The last place a latex balloon should be is in a childís mouth. Does the management know that you are suggesting to a child that they put a balloon in their mouth? Please rethink that.



Please forgive me, I do not mean to be negative nor do I mean to put you down in any way, but I have been entertaining children for three years and I was in shock when I read your post.



Did you know that it is illegal to give a latex balloon to a child under the age of three?



If you do not like balloon work, no problem. Donít do them, but donít take it out on the kids.



_________________

Thank you,

John Zander

***************************

The Award Winning

Comedy Magic of

John Zander

http://www.ZanderMagic.com

http://www.AllMagic.net

***************************
Message: Posted by: Peter Marucci (Nov 4, 2001 08:19PM)
Relax, John, Chad is just kidding.

You ARE kidding, aren't you, Chad? :confused:

If not, I'd be REALLY interested in knowing what sort of places you work!

cheers,

Peter Marucci

showtimecol@aol.com
Message: Posted by: John Zander (Nov 4, 2001 08:47PM)
I'm with you Peter, I hope it is a joke.
Message: Posted by: Steve Brooks (Nov 4, 2001 11:54PM)
Sounds like he's kidding John...I hope. :confused:
Message: Posted by: Cliff (Nov 5, 2001 11:52AM)
I'm with Chad on this one.



Yes.. I am joking :rotf: :rotf: :rotf:
Message: Posted by: Magicman0323 (Nov 5, 2001 12:35PM)
I really hope that you're kidding my man !! :confused:



You know what Iím just gonna consider it a joke.
Message: Posted by: Chad Sanborn (Nov 5, 2001 02:45PM)
man oh man!!!

It was only a joke. Several ideas from different sources came into play for that one. But all of them I have seen done to kids!!! Except the straw bit. That bit of genius was my own. But the asking about gas.. etc, came from what I saw a waiter do to a kid in a restaurant (Dicks last resort)

The worm joke came form Rick Thomas in Vegas.



But the original thought about kids wanting balloon animals and not magic is true! So why do magicians make them sit through it??

Just make the balloon and go. I have seen many performers do this.



Chad
Message: Posted by: Bengi (Nov 5, 2001 03:06PM)
Children of the world are safe again!!!!!!!!!



Glad to hear you were just joking!!!!



Bengi :yippee:
Message: Posted by: Scott F. Guinn (Nov 5, 2001 04:16PM)
I donít do balloons myself. There are a couple of reasons for this--I donít have anything against doing them, particularly by the guys who are really good at it.

One reason I DONíT is because almost everyone else in my area does! They also do the same eight or ten tricks. I do almost exclusively my own material and Iím also a ventriloquist, so I have set myself apart. In fact, quite often, a prospective client asks me if I do balloon animals. When I say no, they respond "Thank God! Youíre hired!"



The other reason I choose not to do balloons is the liability issue. Some little tyke has a balloon pop and puts out his eye or chokes on it, and I am liable! so I donít do them. I am constantly amazed at the number of magicians, waiters, etc who give balloons to infants and toddlers. Not me, boy!



Funny story--

Thereís a guy in my area (HORRIBLE performer!) who does balloons at his ever-changing restaurant gig. This has actually happened a number of times--Iíve witnessed it once and been told about other very similar occasions. He walks up to the table and says, "Would you like a balloon sculpture?" The kid says yes and he explains that they can have a sword or a hat in red or green. The kids says, "A green hat!" And this guy says, "Well, Iíve already started a red sword!" And thatís what he gives the kid! I guess maybe heís going for an additional mind-reading effect that doesnít always work?!?!?!
Message: Posted by: John Zander (Nov 5, 2001 06:40PM)
I have never done balloons strolling, but a friend of mine does and says that he almost always gets a tip at that table. For me it is more trouble than it is worth, I canít blow the darn things up. I do use them in the kid shows (and charge extra :wavey: ) but use a pump.



Glad it was a joke!



_________________

Thank you,

John Zander

***************************

The Award Winning

Comedy Magic of

John Zander

http://www.ZanderMagic.com

http://www.AllMagic.net

***************************
Message: Posted by: Peter Marucci (Nov 5, 2001 06:49PM)
While I do balloons and/or magic (I give 'em what they want!), there is a problem:

Many hospitals, etc. won't allow balloons or balloonists because of latex allergies. This is becoming more and more common, for some reason.

So -- at a recent convention in North Carolina, a couple of the guys had strands of beads (tiny ones, from craft shops, used for trim) and made little dogs out of the beads.

The finished product is about 3/4 of an inch long -- a Minnie Pearl Poodle (assuming you are using white beads).

I learned how to do this -- same twists as ballooning -- and customers just love it. It is ideal for restaurants, since you don't have to worry about the balloon popping and bits flying into someone's soup or (heaven forbid!) drink.

cheers,

Peter Marucci

showtimecol@aol.com :dancing:
Message: Posted by: Scott F. Guinn (Nov 5, 2001 08:58PM)
Oragami frogs, roses and rabbits with cards and napkins are also a nice alternative that I use quite a bit.
Message: Posted by: Magicman0323 (Nov 6, 2001 07:58AM)
right on greatscott, very good alternatives !! :nod:
Message: Posted by: Burt Yaroch (Nov 6, 2001 07:32PM)
Is this something us newbies can expect when searching out our first gigs?

The expectation of making balloon animals?

:confused:



I mean, am I to spend years practicing, working on my presentation, mastering misdirection only to be confronted with,

"Can you make a balloon giraffe?"



This was more tongue :kermit: in cheek than not but is that a realistic expectation? Are you guys ever turned away because you canít twist the latex?
Message: Posted by: Peter Marucci (Nov 6, 2001 07:37PM)
Very good alternatives, indeed, scott.

There are several web pages that explain how to make a paper rose (out of a bar napkin).

So, instead of balloons, you can hand out origami frogs and pearl dogs to the kids and paper roses to the women.

Not too shabby! :banana:

cheers,

Peter Marucci

showtimecol@aol.com
Message: Posted by: Scott F. Guinn (Nov 6, 2001 09:56PM)
Y&J-

I've never been turned down for a show because I don't do balloon animals, but yes, some people assume that all magicians do them. A number of magicians have suggested that you must, therefore, learn them, because "You always have to give them what they want!" I disagree. Some magicians also juggle; does that mean we all have to? Some also sing--should we all? Les Trix at the San Remo does magic topless, but I'm not going to.



Just as we all don't have to do the same effects, neither do we all have to do the same "variety" bits in addition to magic. If you want to do balloons or if you don't, that's your choice. Just make sure that what you do perform is very, very good, and the client will be happy!
Message: Posted by: Jim Davis (Nov 9, 2001 12:45PM)
I hate to even admit to this, but I do know how to tie my share of balloons :hmm:,

but I have NEVER once taken them to the Wagonmaster Steak Co.

(The themed restaraunt where I work.)



I have used them before at a family restaraunt, and that was all I did.. there was not time for magic, and I was constantly interruppted by some 4 year old "Whenís my turn mister?" I learned, just like all things in life, there is a time and place for everything.



Use your head, and determine what you are trying to accomplish, magician -vs- balloonist! :confused:

And yes I could almost always get tipped when I twisted balloons, but then I donít really work for tips, I work not to be a jerk!



Iím really glad the story at the top was just that a story!

Now I can breathe and laugh! Clever! :bg:



_________________

Diamond Jim Davis "The Cardslinger"
Message: Posted by: Dennis Michael (Nov 12, 2001 04:22AM)
Remember the basic rules of MAGIC.

[b][list]

[*] 1. Entertain First, Mystify Second

[*] 2. Itís not what you like that matters.

[*] 3. Give the client more for the buck!

[/list][/b]



If you can add balloons to your act, the more valuable of an entertainer you are. This also goes for juggling, and puppets and you donít have to be a ventriloquist.



The great thing about balloons, is there are so many site gags and funny bits of business that can be done. The humor will make your show an added plus!



:bunny:



_________________

Dennis Dowhy (800) 927-6671

[url=http://www.magic-magic.com]www.Magic-Magic.com[/url]

[email]DennisDowhy@magic-magic.com[/email]
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Nov 12, 2001 08:41AM)
-----------

Remember the basic rules of MAGIC.



1. Entertain First, Mystify Second

-----------

I have to disagree with you. This is the first rule to being an entertainer.



There are far too many out there who "entertain" people with "magic" that is un magical, un mystifying, and doesnít astound anyone. That is their prerogative, but it ainít magic. It gives magic a bad public image.



If anyone wishes to discuss this further I suggest we create a new topic, probably under the theory section.



Tom Cutts
Message: Posted by: cataquet (Dec 1, 2001 05:30AM)
I carry balloons with me, and I do balloon animals, as well as Kenton Knepper's "Coin in Balloon" It's fantastic and impromptu!



However, the main reason I carry the balloons is to silence/control the hecklers (if I have any). As you know, blowing up a balloon, if you don't know how to do it, is not easy. So, tell them that for your next trick, you need a balloon and ask them to blow it up.



Bye for now



Harold
Message: Posted by: Doug Byrd (Dec 10, 2001 01:08AM)
When it comes to balloon animals you have to ask yourself, "Do I want to do magic or do I want to do balloon animals"? I have done some restaurant work in the past and what Iíve seen is once the balloon animals start thatís it for the entire time.



Of course, it could also be determined by the venue as well. When I did the balloon animals I was hired to do a kids night and that is what they wanted. Hey I got paid.



When I did more bar work I never did balloons. Just handed out the occassional paper rose. This was all magic.



What Iím getting at here is that having the balloon expertise in my repetroire got me more gigs and more chances for money than I would have been eligible for. It all comes down to what is more important for you. Iíve gotten more gigs by having this ability in my bag of tricks than the guys who do nothing but magic.



Just my 2 Drachma Worth,

Doug :kewl:



_________________

No good deed ever goes unpunished.
Message: Posted by: Peter Marucci (Dec 10, 2001 03:34AM)
The more you can do, the more you work.

It's that simple.

I do a lot of balloons with my magic in street work.

But there are many venues where balloons simply aren't suitable: Up-scale table hopping, hospitals (some ban balloons because of latex allergies, a growing problem), etc.

In that case, I do the bead doggie (which is exactly the same as balloon work but with a strand of small plastic "pearls"; the reaction is phenomenal!), paper rose, origami, or whatever will fit.

If you can't do balloons (for whatever reason), there are still many other "giveaways" that you can come up with that are equally good.

And that, quite simply, translates into more work!

cheers,

Peter Marucci

showtimecol@aol.com
Message: Posted by: p.b.jones (Dec 10, 2001 10:12AM)
HI, I vote mystify and entertain together!
Message: Posted by: Dave Lewis (Dec 17, 2001 06:39PM)
Iíve worked in restaurants doing nothing BUT balloons and zero magic. Iíve worked in restaurants doing all magic and no balloons. Iíve also worked in restaurants where I did both. If tips are what you crave, balloons win hands down -- PERIOD!



Granted, youíll have to be fast and blow them up by mouth to be impressive, which can be both painful and frustrating. When I was developing my abilities as a magician, I used balloons as a crutch.



I did my few tricks and a lot of balloons until my abilities improved enough to rely on the magic alone.



If you are striving to make a difference in the World as a top notch magician, you donít need balloons to get there. Youíll probably get big corporate contracts and TV shows that will make you all the money youíll need.



If you are anywhere in between, having the ability to do both without over-selling either, has helped me get a lot of gigs. The idea of demanding that the kids watch some magic before they get a balloon is one that can work if youíve read your audience correctly. Forcing the magic on them doesnít work.



Thatís my fifty cents worth.



Dave
Message: Posted by: dorbolo (Dec 19, 2001 11:00PM)
Your points are right on, for me Dave.



So far as I can tell, general audiences consider balloon twisting to be just as magical as card effects, card flourishes, coin effects, cups and balls, and the rest. To most folks, the balloon routine works as a metamorphosis (perhaps even a production)

i.e. making a Parrot in a Perch out of a simple childís toy. Here is a balloon,

30 seconds later - here is a monkey!

I do not think that turning a centavo into

a silver half qualifies as more magical.

I am sure that both appear magical to the average person.



Like all else in magic, the real work is in the performance skills. Handing out balloons is not the point. A well rehearsed routine designed for comedy or suspense is key to good twisting. With that sort of planning, anyone could easily meld magical technique with ballooning technique.



I note that anti-balloon magicians frequently describe twisting as "the doggie balloon" or such. And in that, I see the main problem. If the best you are prepared to do is a three-twist dog, then ballooning will certainly be dull and unattractive.



When you can twist fifty an hour with a wide menu of choices and solid interactive routining -- then youíve got something going.



Bruce Posgateís book, "Table Hopping" lays out the methods of balloons as part of a restaurant magic act. Good book.



In good spirit,



Jon
Message: Posted by: PaulTemple (Jul 5, 2010 10:29AM)
This is easy. I'm a magician not a balloon twister. I've never understood what they have to do with eachother.
Message: Posted by: montymagi (Jul 5, 2010 04:02PM)
I do a mixture of both and it seems to go over very well. I started out doing just magic and go into balloon twisting now I am about even in skill and presentation with both. If you don't like it don't do it. I agree with an previous post, the more you can do, the more you work. I will tell that I can not get away with just doing one or the other at the two restaurants where I work. The families want both every time.

Just because you can do both does not mean you are any less of a magician. It just means you are a magician +
Message: Posted by: Hart Keene (Jul 8, 2010 02:05AM)
I don't do balloons, never have...

Been doing restaurants for over 7 years, never had a problem. But the day you "start" doing them then you will have a problem! It will never stop!!!

The guy who subs for me does them but I specifically tell him NOT to do balloons when he works for me. He thanks me, he would way rather do magic the whole time. lol

I also don't do them because of the liability issues that Scott mentioned.

Also, this is just MY opinion but I don't think tables of adults will take you seriously if they see you doing balloons right before you approach them. Most of my work is for adults so I think its best for me to steer clear! I do have a fair amount of "kid" material and I never have kids ask me for balloons so no worries there either. Again, this was just my opinion...
Message: Posted by: Mary Mowder (Jul 8, 2010 03:05AM)
Balloons and Beads are both a choking hazard if the kids are young.

If you give a balloon out eventually an adult has to deal with a kid who's popped the balloon. At a party that's going to be several kids. I'd rather leave a Magical wake than a wake of whining kids (even if I never have to deal with them).

I want to be a Magician so if I can't start with the balloons without doing it all night I'd rather never start.
If it were just about the money I wouldn't have chosen Magic as my living.

I really do enjoy watching a good or entertaining balloon sculptor but I hate being given one to carry around (or ditch).
This is especially bad when the twister acts like he's giving me a gold nugget and I have to act like I'm totally charmed. I'm an adult and my ability to gush over a balloon animal is waning.
Message: Posted by: jazzy snazzy (Jul 8, 2010 04:51AM)
Right on Mary.
Not my cup of tea either. I tend to avoid free handouts of any kind. People waiting in line can become very demanding. Great tips on the street however if you are so inclined.
Message: Posted by: Skip Way (Jul 8, 2010 07:29AM)
I totally understand the magic purists; it just isn't my way. I guess I'm one of those mentioned by Tom Cutts - I am an entertainer first and foremost and a magician second - and I say that with pride. For me, it's not just a balloon - it's a balloon and a show. My comedy poodle routine alone runs 3-4 minutes and evokes laughter from kids and adults alike. That's what my restaurants and private clients pay me to do and I love it.

I don't work "lines." I will refuse any restaurant or event that wants me to stand in one place rather than hop tables. That's assembly line work and I am an entertainer.

Being very aware of the problems Mary mentioned, I give bite-resistant 7" vinyl beach balls and inflatable fish tethered with a length of yarn to children under the age of 3. For the older children, I use 160's and 5" rounds exclusively. They are less likely to break, take up less room and fit little hands perfectly. When the rare 160 does break, it's usually into two large pieces - one on the floor and one in my hand. As a bonus, women and girls love the petite 160 poodle and wrist corsage.

So I suppose it depends on your personal goals. I have no desire whatsoever to be the next Dai Vernon or Steve Beam. Balloons, magic and humor work very well for me. C'est la vie!
Message: Posted by: mota (Jul 8, 2010 07:30AM)
Mark Byrne (of the excellent series "Bad to the Balloon") has essentially solved the popping problem by only making hats. When they aren't in the little critter's hands they seldom get broke.

I think Mark also has a few observations about choking on twisting balloons too...just doesn't happen with twisting balloons. Those stories are right up there with the vanishing hitchhiker.

I do understand not wanting to do balloons...everything isn't for everyone. Just consider whether you are making your decision based on personal preference or unfounded fears. If balloons are not who you are you need to be true to yourself.

I find what people can now make from balloons to be amazing and beautiful...a lot of happiness can be had here.
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Jul 8, 2010 07:39AM)
I used to make balloons, but considering how hostile balloons make some parents, I stopped making them. If the client only booked me for a certain amount of time, people would still be clamoring for a balloon, long after the time has passed. If you work balloon lines, you need to pack heat. lol

Besides, I don't want to be lumped in with the generic magicians who do make balloon animals. Asking me to make a balloon animal would be a little like asking Tony Bennett to sing "Freebird" - it's a bad fit. I put my energies into my show, and it shows.
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Jul 8, 2010 09:24AM)
I have never made a balloon animal in my life. I do StarGazer, the napkin rose, and the pearl poodle. I always try to take the road least traveled.
Message: Posted by: Bad to the Balloon (Jul 8, 2010 10:59AM)
Does anyone realize this thread is over 9 years old!?!?!?!?!

If you think kids choke on balloon animal balloons read my posts in Balloons 101.

I do disagree that balloons are not entertaining, I believe there is not such thing as a bad trick .... just bad performers!!! Same could be said about balloons, if you are not an artist or care what your final product looks like it will show.

Doing balloon just because the market demands it is ..... well Proselytizing your self.
Message: Posted by: DStachowiak (Jul 8, 2010 01:29PM)
[quote]
On 2001-11-06 20:37, Peter Marucci wrote:
Very good alternatives, indeed, scott.

There are several web pages that explain how to make a paper rose (out of a bar napkin).

So, instead of balloons, you can hand out origami frogs and pearl dogs to the kids and paper roses to the women.

Not too shabby! :banana:

cheers,

Peter Marucci

showtimecol@aol.com
[/quote]

just be careful about giving pearl poodles to the little ones, as they present a REAL choking hazard.
Message: Posted by: DStachowiak (Jul 8, 2010 02:17PM)
[quote]
On 2001-12-20 00:00, dorbolo wrote:
Your points are right on, for me Dave.



So far as I can tell, general audiences consider balloon twisting to be just as magical as card effects, card flourishes, coin effects, cups and balls, and the rest. To most folks, the balloon routine works as a metamorphosis (perhaps even a production)

i.e. making a Parrot in a Perch out of a simple childís toy. Here is a balloon,

30 seconds later - here is a monkey!

I do not think that turning a centavo into

a silver half qualifies as more magical.

I am sure that both appear magical to the average person.



Like all else in magic, the real work is in the performance skills. Handing out balloons is not the point. A well rehearsed routine designed for comedy or suspense is key to good twisting. With that sort of planning, anyone could easily meld magical technique with ballooning technique.



I note that anti-balloon magicians frequently describe twisting as "the doggie balloon" or such. And in that, I see the main problem. If the best you are prepared to do is a three-twist dog, then ballooning will certainly be dull and unattractive.



When you can twist fifty an hour with a wide menu of choices and solid interactive routining -- then youíve got something going.



Bruce Posgateís book, "Table Hopping" lays out the methods of balloons as part of a restaurant magic act. Good book.



In good spirit,



Jon
[/quote]
I recently started doing balloons, after observing a friend of mine who gets party gigs right and left because he does them in his restaurant work. His balloon repertoire consists of swords, two-balloon hats, and the "all-purpose, 4 legged animal"-AKA the three twist doggy, varying the length of the segments for whatever animal he wants to pass it off as.

I don't really like this approach, so I made the huge investment of $3 for a 32 page booklet called "LaMonica's Balloon Sculptures". I bought a bag of 260s and spent a weekend twisting up monkeys, clowns, rabbits, doves, elephants, flowers and of course, dogs.
I can't attribute any gigs to this as yet, since I have only used it one time so far in a busking situation, but that one time has convinced me it was a good move. I now have a skill that pulls an audience together for my performances, holds them through the show, and puts money in the hat, as well as generating business card requests.
What I found most amazing was that it is relatively easy to acquire a fairly wide repertoire of interesting sculptures, and it gives me something to entertain children six and under with (This was a BIG problem for me)
I don't know if it would be more "impressive" to blow them up by mouth, but the fact is, my chronic respiratory issues oblige me to use a pump. I haven't had anyone complain about it yet.
Anyway, for me, balloon sculpture is entirely a plus.
Just a quick note, I want to echo something Pete Marrucci mentioned earlier. When I was practicing the different sculptures on that weekend I mentioned above, I filled two large trash bags with sculptures. That Monday I thought I'd drive over to a local hospital and donate them to the Pediatric Ward. I was informed that due to liability issues related to latex allergies, only Mylar ballons are permitted in the hospital.
Don
Message: Posted by: Tim Dowd (Jul 8, 2010 05:57PM)
/*JOKE*/
what happens when you have to cut off the line? Maybe we can merge this thread with "do you carry protection to gigs" 'cos I promised not to post there ever again...
/*EKOJ*/
Message: Posted by: magicguyri (Sep 24, 2010 07:25PM)
Next thread, PLEASE! Being a professional means knowing when not to use balloons...and when it can be magical for the spectator.
Message: Posted by: echomagic (Sep 25, 2010 02:53PM)
Regarding balloons being a hazard, please get insurance. It gives you peace of mind. Compared to malpractice insurance, it is really inexpensive.

Most Magicians that I know do what is necessary to make a living. Most restaurants in the Northeast consider it a bonus when balloons and magic are both offered when tablehopping. I actually make more money making balloons than doing magic ( maybe that says something about my magic ).

Ultimately, do what is right for you, but, think about what may be best for you to earn a living.

All things being equal, who would have a better chance of landing the gig, the Magician who does only magic or the Magician also makes up balloon animals or offers something else besides magic ( psychic reading, perhaps )?
Message: Posted by: Nem (Apr 13, 2019 04:40PM)
[quote]On Dec 17, 2001, Dave Lewis wrote:
Iíve worked in restaurants doing nothing BUT balloons and zero magic. Iíve worked in restaurants doing all magic and no balloons. Iíve also worked in restaurants where I did both. If tips are what you crave, balloons win hands down -- PERIOD!

True enough. If your working around children though, save the balloons for last if your doing magic too. Otherwise you will deal with noise and distraction.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Apr 13, 2019 05:24PM)
9 year old thread. Interesting.
Message: Posted by: Nem (Apr 13, 2019 05:52PM)
How so?
I think if someone reads something on the Cafť and has thoughts, they should post. Guess that's not the way everyone thinks it should be. I personally don't care how old a thread is.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Apr 14, 2019 12:28AM)
[quote]On Apr 13, 2019, Nem wrote:
[quote]On Dec 17, 2001, Dave Lewis wrote:
If tips are what you crave, balloons win hands down -- PERIOD! . [/quote]


I imagine this is partly due to ďthe law of reciprocity.Ē If you give somebody so theming, they have an almost instinctive need to give you something in return. Studies have shown that servers who give a mint with the bill receive larger tips than those who do not. Giving a balloon sparks That need, more so than making sponges balls Hop around. Additionall if your giving. Balloons to the kids, youíre playing on maternal and paternal instincts as well.
Message: Posted by: davidpaul$ (Apr 14, 2019 09:18AM)
[quote]On Apr 14, 2019, imgic wrote:
[quote]On Apr 13, 2019, Nem wrote:
[quote]On Dec 17, 2001, Dave Lewis wrote:
If tips are what you crave, balloons win hands down -- PERIOD! . [/quote]


I imagine this is partly due to ďthe law of reciprocity.Ē If you give somebody so theming, they have an almost instinctive need to give you something in return. Studies have shown that servers who give a mint with the bill receive larger tips than those who do not. Giving a balloon sparks That need, more so than making sponges balls Hop around. Additionall if your giving. Balloons to the kids, youíre playing on maternal and paternal instincts as well. [/quote]

Don't totally agree with the reciprocity scenario here. I buy mini wands and give to children so they can become actively involved. I also give away Magician Assistant stickers as a reward for them making the magic happen. Regarding tips (I don't solicit tips) it depends on the parents. Some do tip, others don't for whatever reason. My goal as a restaurant worker is to provide a fun experience. Period. Providing give-aways may elicit tips, but that hasn't been my experience as a rule.

My own study after many years regarding tips is that it depends on the personality and nature of the person. Some well to do people don't tip while others who you'd think wouldn't, tip generously.
Also people don't know if they should or if it is allowed etc. I know this isn't a thread on tipping, rather on balloon animals, but it does equate to a degree.