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Topic: Blaine's Secret Intelligence Operations
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Jan 31, 2004 07:53PM)
I really like David Blaine. I wouldn't say I'm a Blaineaholic, but I really do enjoy watching his performances.

I also have his dvd. I watch it often. But what really baffles me is not the tricks themselves, as the fact that he is somehow secretly performing some kind of covert operations. Or so it seems. that's the only conclusion I can draw.

I'm speaking about the time when he supposedly doesn't know any bodys name, and suddenly, the name will appear on his arm, or on a taxi cab, or in another case, the image of the guys girlfriend appears on Blaines stomach.

This is information that you wouldn't think he could obtain about strangers on the street that he supposedly just met.

But my magicians logic tells me that he must have obtained the vital info SOMEHOW.

Any guesses on how he does it? You would think he has some kind of secret intelligence gathering team on his side.

But, to tell you the truth, I don't know, and can only conjecture.

I think that these things have really helped him to establish himself and cement his reputation. I think they are the most baffling effects in his shows.

What are your thoughts on this?
Message: Posted by: Reis O'Brien (Feb 1, 2004 03:36PM)
I do like Blaine, but some of these things are rather suspect. As far as the above example goes, I honestly think that was a completely fictitious bit. These guys, or at least the main spec, was a stooge. They hooked up with him earlier, got a pic of his girlfriend, made a "tattoo" of the pic and said, "Ok... now bring some of your friends to this street corner and play along. Here's a hundred bucks."
Granted, I don't know this for sure, but that's what immediately came to mind when I saw it. After hearing about his style of showing his levitations, I now believe that he isn't above some deep tv trickery. I also think his book, although I loved reading it, is far from honest.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Feb 2, 2004 12:40AM)
I haven't purchased the book nor had access to read it, but what you said about the guy in the gap commercial, well, that speaks volumes.

If it is true as your theory explains, then he is setting up alot of his emulators up for disapointment. They will probably never be that lucky to run into those kind of fortuitous situations on the real streets.

This kind of effect has little possibility of being performed by anyone else but Blaine. He made it seem so impromptu, and therein lies the deception. This shows that the man is cunning beyond words.

BUT isn't that what we are suppose to do as magicians?: Use all the cunning at our disposal to create miracles in the minds of spectators?

We are supposed to DECEIVE! That is the heart of magic!

Who are we to say that one of our own has "crossed the line" because he was devilishly cunning and clever in his approach? Is their really any such thing as cheating for a magician? Isn't this a war for the spectators mind, and in war, all is fair!

I remember an article by Juan Tamirez (SP) that I read in Genii and believe I still have. He outlined suggestions and ideas and bold ruses to deceive the spectator! Some of these were pretty darned diabolical, and none of them very fair (To the spectator that is!)

If it's good enough for Juan Tamirez, then it shouild be good enough for all of us, Blaine included.

If he used a stooge in some effects, the effect was that it fooled the pantd off of me. I felt amazement. I experienced that rare moment of astonishment that becomes harder and harder for me to experience the more years I'm in magic. So then, it worked. It accomplished the "Effect" in my mind. and I'm sorry, for I think I've slightly gotten off my own topic.
Message: Posted by: Scott Xavier (Feb 2, 2004 02:41AM)
The book was very far from the truth. A cool read but still far from the truth.

Stooges and heavy pre-show work.
Message: Posted by: Frank Tougas (Feb 2, 2004 11:58AM)
I think the real point here is we are not watching street magic but a show about magic in the street. A television show is a show unto itself, it must have pacing, drama, etc. All the elements of good entertainment.

Naturally that means cutting out the fluffs and bloopers, enhancing an effect for the viewers (who are after all the real audience) and yes even some camera shenanagins! Horrors.

The point is that David Blane did what Henning did the generation before and that was to get a whole new group of people interested in magic.

Every working performer can be grateful for that.
Message: Posted by: Scott Xavier (Feb 2, 2004 05:34PM)
And every non-working performer can blame the audiences preconceived notions of a bad magician with no personality on Blainiacs.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Feb 2, 2004 07:24PM)
Frank, your remarks are right on target and sympathetic to what I myself have been thinking: Think of it this way: Blaine was financially backed by his producers to produce an hour of T.V that would get the almighty ratings. That's the bottom line in that industry, Just ratings.

He had to please the producers and was willing, in my opinion, to really push the envelope to create "effects" that would kill. It was not about honesty in depicting what goes on in the streets for magicians, rather, it was about producing a final product that was visually arresting and above all lucrative.

(This is all my conjecture, but I am very certain I am perspicacious enough to come to a conclusion that is amazingly accurate.)

This, as I said, was all for the money, and the producers, I'm sure, could have cared less what methods or ruses Blaine used to achieve the end result. Camera tricks, stooges, dubious editing, cranes to lift you four feet into the air, whatever, if it looked like magic to the T.V. audience, then it was fair game.

That is why things happen that are so unrealistic. Chosen cards appearing in basketballs, names appearing on taxi cabs, playing cards appearing in a policeman's boot, girlfriends ghostly images appearing on his stomach, and on and on the list goes.

Let's be realistic, you and I have little chance to make this stuff happen "spontaneously", on the spur of the moment, but that is sure the impression these shows convey.

Folks, it's not real, it's a fantasy world, and it takes time and money to set up these one shot wonders.

But if you are not in the know, then they come off as genuine miracles.

Blaine accomplished his goals, so I say all the more power to him.
Message: Posted by: illuzns (Feb 3, 2004 01:25AM)
Just a short note. Blaine has brought street magic to a new (albeit incredibly unreachable)level. He has focused the attention of the everyday lay person into the realm of magic.

That said, I too do not necessarily agree with EVERY method which Blaine has used in his shows, but he has helped Magic as a whole in bringing attention to the close-up workers instead of the constant bombardment of large illusion shows on TV.

He's good and credit should be given where it is due.
Your friend in magic,
Allen Cleveland
Message: Posted by: Reis O'Brien (Feb 3, 2004 02:01PM)
Many many good points being made here. I'm not knocking Blaine for doing what it takes to make a good tv special. My only problem is that I feel bad for these young kids who think what he's doing on tv is real, and so they start to learn magic and then later end up disapointed when they see the real man behind the curtain.

And then we come to the concept of going too far. All magicians know that there is a point in any routine or effect that will stretch credibility to its limits. And I think the ghostly-girlfriend-face effect is a fine example of taking it too far. When I first saw that special, before I got into magic, I was blown away over and over again. But I remember seeing that bit with the girlfriend's face and thinking, "Oh, give me a break!" See? I was a layman, and even I couldn't fall for that one.

But, giving credit where it is due, those specials are also the reason I got into magic, so Blaine still gets props from me! I just take him with a few more grains of salt now.
Message: Posted by: Mike Walton (Feb 3, 2004 03:00PM)
[quote]
On 2004-02-03 15:01, Firedice27 wrote:
Many many good points being made here. I'm not knocking Blaine for doing what it takes to make a good tv special. My only problem is that I feel bad for these young kids who think what he's doing on tv is real, and so they start to learn magic and then later end up disapointed when they see the real man behind the curtain.

[/quote]

Good points Firedice. I think if a magician "does his job" then people will think it's real. I feel bad when I do Ambitious Card for a 6 year old (have them draw on the card and this trick works perfectly) and they then truly believe a snap will bring their magic card to the top of the deck. They truly believe that...am I wrong to frame the effect as such? I don't think so, as a little astonishment adds life.

I don't think Blaine's use of stooges, intelligence, etc. is wrong at all. Besides, it's TV, and we know that information over this medium isn't meant to be accurate, only engaging.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Feb 3, 2004 04:41PM)
Hey, fellas, I'm not trying to convey the impression that I don't like Blaine, because I do! Read my original post at the beginning of the thread, and you will see.

I have been just as astonished at the the effects as anyone else. But in the end, I come to my senses, my magicians thinking kicks in, and I lose the astonishment and start drawing some conclusions.

In fact, I was just trying to convey what I conjecture is going on behind the scenes to create the illusionary world that we view on our T.V. screens.

I don't see anything wrong with him pushing the envelope, as long as it produces the end result of amazement.

We should all be so cunning and crafty as him, and our magic would be significantly better for it.

He employs Machiavellian strategies and succeeds wildly in his efforts. For that I applaud him.


The more I think about it, the more it occurs to me that he is devilishly clever. he gives the word deceitful new meaning. And that, to me, makes a good magician.

That is why I said "All the more power to him"

I believe a few magicians are jealous of him. That is a small way to live.
Message: Posted by: EventEntertainer (Feb 3, 2004 04:49PM)
What I do not understand is why did he use plants (yes, I happen to know this fact), when 99% of the effect he did could be done in an impromptu setting?

ON another note, what does Blaine call himself these days. He isn't really a magician (when is the last time you saw him do any kind of magic trick)? An artist? Performer?
Message: Posted by: Frank Tougas (Feb 3, 2004 06:08PM)
I believe he fancies himself as a magician that does performance art. Melding the two.
Message: Posted by: tophat (Feb 3, 2004 06:15PM)
[quote]
names appearing on taxi cabs
[/quote]
For the record, this was just pure coincidence. Or at least, it says so in his book.
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (Feb 3, 2004 08:37PM)
Gazzo, Cerline are the top street buskers.
But as for Blaine, I have been selling the tricks he bought for years. Now thankfully I am asked all day long, "Do you know how he bit the coin? Yeah, sure for $30 pound please, you can do it too. What about the rising card? Yeah, sure. $10."

He has done well to make magic and himself popular. He has made his fortunes through the streets, but not while on the street. The guy is good at what he does, which is self promoting. He has made magic popular, but as for passing the hat, the noble task of entertaining and making you laugh and then parting with your well earned cash, you have to leave that to the buskers at the shopping mall near you. Until you taste the open air stage as you step out to entertain, you don't know really what I am talking about.
The difference between Blaine and a busker is the difference between The Spice Girls and Bob Dillon.
The Spice Girls made their millions; Bob Dillon is in the heart and sung by every other busker.
The only ones that can make a true judgement on Blaine as a street magi I believe are buskers. Blaine as a performer, if he turns you on great.
:stircoffee:
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Feb 4, 2004 06:42AM)
[quote]
On 2004-02-03 19:15, tophat wrote:
[quote]
names appearing on taxi cabs
[/quote]
For the record, this was just pure coincidence. Or at least, it says so in his book.
[/quote]

No way! I can never bring myself to believe that was pure coincidence! He HAD to set it up! I think he is asking A LOT if he thinks we are going to believe it was nothing but a coincidence! I smell a rat!
Message: Posted by: ABlair36 (Feb 7, 2004 07:15PM)
I am pretty sure those were stooges as well as a lot of his televised tricks.

Does anyone know the name of the trick that he does where he shows a card, puts it back on the deck, and puts the card between the audence member's hands. Then he shows the next top card, puts it back on the deck, waves the top card over the audience member's hands and the cards switch places. I know how it is done but I don't know what it is called.
Can anyone tell me the name of the effect?
Message: Posted by: CLJ (Feb 7, 2004 11:13PM)
Here Then There. or Eddie Fechter's Simple Two-Card Transposition? Can't remember if both are the same, I know the popularised name is Here then There. Coined from Card College.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Feb 8, 2004 03:25AM)
The effect is two card monte.
Message: Posted by: Mike Walton (Feb 8, 2004 07:20AM)
The single card transposition between the hand sandwich and the deck is Here then There. I'll use it to grab someone's attention as it's so simple and magical.

Two card monte is 2 cards switching with 2 other cards with more patter and misdirection.
Message: Posted by: Reis O'Brien (Feb 8, 2004 01:38PM)
[quote]
On 2004-02-03 19:15, tophat wrote:
[quote]
names appearing on taxi cabs
[/quote]
For the record, this was just pure coincidence. Or at least, it says so in his book.
[/quote]

Oh! Well, if it says so in his book... how can I argue with such an honest and accurate product?
Message: Posted by: Jamie Schoolcraft (Feb 8, 2004 07:28PM)
I just have to say thanks to Blaine for bringing Close-Up magic to the masses, strolling gigs have become plentiful now!
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Feb 8, 2004 10:17PM)
Get while the gettin's good!

Things may not always be this rosey, so go for it School!
Message: Posted by: giochi (Feb 11, 2004 12:52AM)
I admire Blaine very much but of the guys used for the tatoo of the japanese girlfriend trick, one was on a Gap commercial and I saw the other in Tannens. The trick was effective to lay people though, and that's all that's important.
He is a lot better than you think.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Feb 11, 2004 04:54PM)
So then if you saw him in Tannen's, then he was obviously, or most likely another magician, and undoubtedly a stooge.

So then Giochi, with that fact established, what is your take on this?
Message: Posted by: hackmonkey (Feb 16, 2004 09:03PM)
I just want to throw a few things in the mix. You guys are making assumptions; other people are agreeing with them at which point the assumption seems to transform into the truth! The cab effect could easily be performed without stooges. I do a somewhat related effect in magic series I am currently starring in. I perform a card effect where a signed card vanishes from the deck. I take the specs for a walk and happen upon some graffiti (we are in a skate park). Among it is a large Graff of their card complete with their signature. NO STOOGES! The only effect I believe Blaine used a stooge in is the diamond from eye trick. Wait till you see Blaine’s new special - he will do some mentalism that will have you swearing that he is using stooges, such as telling people personal details address etc. Or stopping them and producing a personal item of their's from his pocket, and I promise you they are not stooges or set up. The guy is just very smart.

Joe
Message: Posted by: Dan Monroe (Feb 18, 2004 03:08PM)
A lot of magicians use stooges on stage. I'm pretty sure David Copperfield has used them. I saw him do 2 illusions with people from the crowd in my home town. And when I saw him do the same 2 illusions on his T.V. special he used the same people. Now either these people really get around or DUH? their stooges. My guess is the latter. But did it make the illusions any less enjoyable? No, I still thought they were great! So as far as Blaine goes he entertains with magic. And as far as I can see he entertained millions! So more power to him!
Message: Posted by: Che (Feb 18, 2004 04:48PM)
[quote]
On 2004-02-16 22:03, hackmonkey wrote:
I do a somewhat related effect in magic series I am currently starring in. I perform a card effect where a signed card vanishes from the deck. I take the specs for a walk and happen upon some graffiti (we are in a skate park) among it is a large Graff of their card complete with their signature.
[/quote]

Where can I see this show?!?!?!?!

I know from another thread you said it was going to be in the UK only but if it is released on video let me/us know!!!!!
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Feb 18, 2004 08:25PM)
Dan

Just wondered if you would be willing to share specifically which two Copperfield illusions use the "wandering" spectators.

And my observation on the Taxi cab verses the graffiti wall: The graffiti wall can be set up in advance, waiting for the arrival of the spectators to view it.

The Cab, on the other hand would require a human presence to drive and steer the thing. That's where the stooge would come in.

(You would have to have someone agree ahead of time to drive the cab to a given spot.)

Then someone one would have to find out that the name Dawn is somehow special to that person.

After that information is gleened, then David has to "run into" that girl on the street at just the right moment, and arrange to have the taxi cab pull up at that same moment also.

And this all has to come out looking unplanned, and impromptu.

That is a monumental task, unless EVERYONE involved in the effect is a stooge.

A lot to think about, isn't it?
Message: Posted by: hackmonkey (Feb 20, 2004 10:45PM)
When you said stooge I was thinking of the spectator rather than the guy in the cab. I would not call the guy in the cab a stooge, more like an assistant. As for the graff wall effect, the spec is a complete stranger and the card has his exact signature. I don't want to start arguing methods, but how could this be set up in advance anymore than the name on the cab?
Message: Posted by: Review King (Feb 22, 2004 06:38PM)
It's called -SHOW BUSINESS. Sit back and think long and hard about those two words!
Message: Posted by: hackmonkey (Feb 24, 2004 02:17PM)
At the end of the day MagicChris is right (although I am not sure who he is talking to?) and this discussion is pointless really. I can state that Blaine does have 'Secret Intelligence Operations' as well as a good team of magicians behind him. Some tricks he or other magicians do on T.V couldn't be done in the real world. T.V isn't the real world and why not take advantage of the 'stage' that you are set. My 'graff-card' effect is not only impractical but technically illegal. I still did it because I thought it would make good T.V and look magical which is really what it is all about.

Joe

p.s Isn't this really the wrong forum for this discussion, shouldn't it be in 'magic names in the media' or something?
Message: Posted by: Review King (Feb 25, 2004 11:49PM)
Hackmonkey I liked your P.S. Right on the mark!!
Message: Posted by: Sid Mayer (Feb 26, 2004 10:07PM)
How many of you believe that David Copperfield (DC) actually floated across the Grand Canyon (GC)?

I am quite certain that DC could only levitate over the GC on the TV (Television). I hope that I have not revealed too much in this post.

Sheesh!

Sid
Message: Posted by: magicman123 (Mar 1, 2004 07:09PM)
When blaine had the lady think of a name and it appered on the cab, that was just a coincidence. It tells you so in his auto biography. You might want to check it out it has some pretty cool stuff in there.
Message: Posted by: Oz Fan (Mar 1, 2004 10:15PM)
[quote]
On 2004-02-07 20:15, ABlair36 wrote:
I am pretty sure those were stooges as well as a lot of his televised tricks.

Does anyone know the name of the trick that he does where he shows a card, puts it back on the deck, and puts the card between the audence member's hands. Then he shows the next top card, puts it back on the deck, waves the top card over the audience member's hands and the cards switch places. I know how it is done but I don't know what it is called.
Can anyone tell me the name of the effect?
[/quote]


Hey its Oz fan on all the websites its just called the amazing switch or amazing transposition.
Message: Posted by: Twitch (Mar 2, 2004 12:45AM)
Just watch it closely and you should be able to figure that one out if you have a fair amount of knowledge in cards it's really a no brainer.
Message: Posted by: shinobi (Mar 6, 2004 04:56AM)
Yeah, and unless david Copperfield had a whole bunch of spectators who all happened to be totally insensitive to motion, he couldn't have vanished the statue of liberty without camera trickery or a WHOLE AUDIENCE of stooges!
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Mar 7, 2004 02:50PM)
[quote]
On 2004-02-26 23:07, Sid Mayer wrote:
How many of you believe that David Copperfield (DC) actually floated across the Grand Canyon (GC)?

I am quite certain that DC could only levitate over the GC on the TV (Television). I hope that I have not revealed too much in this post.

Sheesh!

Sid
[/quote]

Of all the Coperfield Specials, that is the one I missed.

I would have REALLY liked to have seen that one. People talk about it often. And they seem to believe that he actually did it.

[quote]
On 2004-03-01 20:09, magicman123 wrote:
When blaine had the lady think of a name and it appered on the cab, that was just a coincidence. It tells you so in his auto biography. You might want to check it out it has some pretty cool stuff in there.
[/quote]

Youmean he was depending upon a random chance coincidence to happen at precisely the right moment that would in the end make him look like a great magician?

What would have happened if the coincidece didn't come through for him? He would have been left with egg on his face!

I think Blaine is lying in his book.

Don't you?

[quote]
On 2004-03-06 05:56, shinobi wrote:
Yeah, and unless david Copperfield had a whole bunch of spectators who all happened to be totally insensitive to motion, he couldn't have vanished the statue of liberty without camera trickery or a WHOLE AUDIENCE of stooges!
[/quote]

SHHHH! You'll give away the illusion of the century!
Message: Posted by: Partizan (Mar 8, 2004 04:34AM)
If I'm working a particular bar/s I may have up to 3 assistants (mates in the know), who will be there for some time, selecting and getting to know targets.
With that backup you can blow people away with amazing feats of mentalism.
Also good for card tricks where they can tip me the card of choice.
So Blaine uses a similar tactic, whats new about that!
I would like to know how much they shot in comparision to the end show. They must of lost lots of footage in the edit.
Message: Posted by: Che (Mar 8, 2004 05:59AM)
[quote]
On 2004-02-03 17:49, Deceptionguy wrote:
What I do not understand is why did he use plants (yes, I happen to know this fact)[/quote]

Please, fill us in on your "Inside" info!!!!
I'm willing to bet that you have no "Insde" info, just like [b]every[/b] other cat who claims to "Know for a fact" about David Blaine's effects.

[quote]
(when is the last time you saw him do any kind of magic trick)?
[/quote]

On every special he releases.
Message: Posted by: Whiterabbit (Mar 8, 2004 06:04AM)
With respect to Blaine, it always seemed to me that there were three elements to magic: showmanship, misdirection and technique: and Blaine does the first very well. I'm sure there's a little bit of creative editing from time to time in the specials, but let's face it you'd be mad not to do that in a special.

Blaine's not really my cup of tea, and when I think of street magicians I tend to think of Gazzo, Cellini and Sheridan. However, because of showmanship and connections - the public tend to think of him and he's worked hard for that to happen. He's also given the art enormous publicity.

Of course, I don't think Blaine is ever going to be the magician's street magician - but I don't think he aspires to that. Overall, I think he's a positive influence... The main objections to him seem to come from magicians who know some of the technical shortcomings, and given the focus of his work on the public and not magicians, maybe those who 'sledge' him for the editing etc. are being unfair to him.

After all, in the music world there are bands that are live bands and recording studio bands - I just think Blaine is in the latter category magically even though he purports to be 'live'.
Message: Posted by: jimx (Mar 16, 2004 07:08PM)
I have to admit that David Blaine is what got me back into magic a couple of months ago after a big break since childhood. It's not that I want to emulate him, it's just he reminded me of how cool card magic was and he rekindled my interest. The only trick I can think of off-hand that I saw that I wanted to learn is the Ambitious Card, but even then I'm studying Oz Pearlman's version and not Blaine's.

I had a lot more respect for Blaine after I saw his first TV show recently. Until then I just thought he was that fruitcake on a hunger strike above the Thames river.
Message: Posted by: VitoM (Mar 19, 2004 06:15PM)
Blaine does an excellent job at putting together TV specials that blow the lay people away.
What I enjoy is when people ask me if I know that "one trick Blaine did", and I proceed to do it for them. I usually get a HUGE reaction because they got to see it infront of their face, and it convinces them that the magic he's doing isn't camera tricks. This will help me with the next trick I do for them.
In terms of stooges that Blaine uses - yeah probably. His presentation style is still fun to watch, and I enjoy watching him to get ideas for my own performances.
Message: Posted by: Jordini (Mar 26, 2004 09:04PM)
Two words: Center Tear
Message: Posted by: Liam Jones (Mar 27, 2004 05:02AM)
[quote]
On 2004-01-31 20:53, daffydoug wrote:
I really like David Blaine. I wouldn't say I'm a Blaineaholic, but I really do enjoy watching his performances.

I also have his dvd. I watch it often. But what really baffles me is not the tricks themselves, as the fact that he is somehow secretly performing some kind of covert operations. Or so it seems. that's the only conclusion I can draw.

I'm speaking about the time when he supposedly doesn't know any bodys name, and suddenly, the name will appear on his arm, or on a taxi cab, or in another case, the image of the guys girlfriend appears on Blaines stomach.
[/quote]

the name on the taxi was a mistake that wasn't meant to happen, some kids where said to of spray painted it on!!! the name was a coincedense
Message: Posted by: prospero (Apr 1, 2004 07:04PM)
Blaine does some cold reading, and he's okay at it. The deal is, there's a whole lot of editing with these shows, and there might be stooges. He probably filmed these mental effects hundreds of times before finding one that worked. But keep in mind his performance style is very unorthodox, and his presentation allows the audience to become more susceptible to verbal control, and makes it easier for him to read people.
Message: Posted by: Jamie D. Grant (Apr 3, 2004 08:53PM)
Annemann said it was perfectly acceptable to use six s*****s, if necessary, to convincingly fool a seventh spectator. Blaine used three-a man, a woman, and a taxi driver-and he fooled millions. Including a lot of 'magicians' it seems...

django
Message: Posted by: Richard Lucas (Apr 4, 2004 03:20PM)
What ever!

Blaine is very entertaining and that's the bottom line. He is popular and has done a world of good for all magicians regardless of their skills. He is a walking sandwich board that screams Magic is Fun to Watch!

Good tricks to all.
Message: Posted by: Review King (Apr 4, 2004 04:05PM)
I wish Magicians would stop trying to earn money and become famous. If only they were more like Houdini.

;-)
Message: Posted by: NFox (Apr 10, 2004 07:32PM)
I was just going to sit back and read these posts, but then I saw the name of "The Almighty DC" Profaned. It is completely possible vanish the Statue of Liberty without resorting to the Masked Magician's method. There doesn't have to be any audience involvement. Honestly, if they were going to choose stooges, you'd think they would have chosen more animated/ more eloquent people ("It just went" or "I have never seen a statue of liberety disappear the way that this one has." are some notable examples of poor speaking ability). Just remember that there is more than one way to vanish a statue. Well, now that that was said, I hope that you were just kidding.

Nick Fox
Message: Posted by: T (Apr 20, 2004 06:06PM)
Is it just me , or does Blaine's perfromance style seem really annoying and grating sometimes? I don't think hes that good and have a hard time watching him get through a trick.
Message: Posted by: Che (Apr 21, 2004 11:12AM)
It's just you.