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Topic: Talent Show Act
Message: Posted by: Eaden Marti (Jan 19, 2015 10:49PM)
Is it worth trying to present a card act at a talent show that takes place in a theater? If so, can you list a few ways to make the act look bigger?

Thanks,
Zegel Magic
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Jan 24, 2015 08:41PM)
It depends on what you mean by "card act." If most of the routines occur on the table top--like McDonald's $100 Ace Trick--then a theater audience would have a tough time enjoying it. On the other hand if the routines are like a good Six Card Repeat where the cards are counters where the values and suits don't matter, then it could play well for a theater audience. Of course, if the card act is manipulation--productions of fans of cards, single cards, flourishes--then the act could go over well depending on the presentation and the personality/charisma of the performer.

Speaking of "Six Card Repeat"--Bill Spooner's version is a showstopper:
http://spoonermagic.com/products/six_card_repeat.html
As the ad copy says: "The gimmicked cards are not supplied, but are easy to make."

I've seen Bill perform this routine on several occasions and even among magic audiences it gets a very strong reaction.

Fred Kaps's "Homing Card" routine is a good example of a card trick where the cards are basically just counters:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2CNO_AL_vs

Here's Fred doing another version on "The Ed Sullivan Show":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYh_vPGApbo

----- Sonny
Message: Posted by: Eaden Marti (Jan 29, 2015 05:55PM)
[quote]On Jan 24, 2015, Anatole wrote:
It depends on what you mean by "card act." If most of the routines occur on the table top--like McDonald's $100 Ace Trick--then a theater audience would have a tough time enjoying it. On the other hand if the routines are like a good Six Card Repeat where the cards are counters where the values and suits don't matter, then it could play well for a theater audience. Of course, if the card act is manipulation--productions of fans of cards, single cards, flourishes--then the act could go over well depending on the presentation and the personality/charisma of the performer.

Speaking of "Six Card Repeat"--Bill Spooner's version is a showstopper:
http://spoonermagic.com/products/six_card_repeat.html
As the ad copy says: "The gimmicked cards are not supplied, but are easy to make."

I've seen Bill perform this routine on several occasions and even among magic audiences it gets a very strong reaction.

Fred Kaps's "Homing Card" routine is a good example of a card trick where the cards are basically just counters:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2CNO_AL_vs

Here's Fred doing another version on "The Ed Sullivan Show":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYh_vPGApbo

----- Sonny [/quote]



Thank you so much, my routine is a card effect that uses the cards like slates, as in a slate test.

~Zegel Magic
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Jun 5, 2015 01:28PM)
If this is for magic competition, then the act has to be at least 8 minutes long, maybe even 10 minutes. If just a talent show locally, then whatever they ask for. Usually 5 minutes.
Message: Posted by: Dick Oslund (Jun 8, 2015 03:22AM)
Zegel...

To answer your first question:

Yes. Nate Leipzig was a "standard" act in vaudeville. He presented several card tricks. He ENTERTAINED with them. Paul LePaul was a professional who traveled the world. His prop: a deck of cards. When he toured for the USO, he didn't even carry cards. The local "committee" provided the cards.

To answer your second question:

Use Jumbo cards! (or, learn how to present an act with TRICKS which have visual EFFECTS. There is a difference between VISIBLE and VISUAL.)

You need to understand basic terminology.

A TRICK is what you PERFORM. An EFFECT is what the spectator(s) SEES, or, THINKS THAT HE/SHE SEES.

Scroll up and read my friend Anatole's comments again.

Scroll up and read my friend Bill's comments again.

Now, read my comments again.
Message: Posted by: Anatole (Jul 6, 2017 09:23AM)
The 2017 I.B.M. / SAM 2017 Magic Championships rules state:
-----quote-----
A contestant must present a complete act (not a single trick) of at least five minutes and not more than ten minutes. Remember to consider audience reaction when timing your act.
-----unquote-----
https://www.ibmsam2017.com/contest

I've been a contestant at a few I.B.M. national conventons, and based on my experience I have found that the majority of the acts went beyond the time limit. I have most of the stage acts from the 1982 I.B.M. national convention in New Orleans on videotape* and I'd guess that 70% of the acts went over the time limit.

One can also quibble over what constitutes "a complete act." I think a single trick could qualify as a complete act. If David Berglas were to enter the Close-Up Contest with his eponymous card effect, I think it should be recognized as a complete act.

----- Amado "Sonny" Narvaez

*A New Orleans I.B.M. member had asked permission to videotape any of the stage contest acts that signed a release form. All but one act gave permission and signed a release form. I timed the acts as I watched the tape at home and a high percentage of them went beyond the time limit.