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Topic: False Shuffle for Stacked Deck
Message: Posted by: firewall (Feb 6, 2004 02:38PM)
Which kind of "in the hand" (no table, please) shuffle do you use to mantain your stack and why?
Message: Posted by: Photofnish (Feb 6, 2004 05:06PM)
I've recently started doing Dan Harlan's "Underhanded Overhand Shuffle," which I learned through his "Top Ten" lecture notes, purchased directly from Mr. Harlan through his website (I e-mailed him, and he e-mailed me back with a listing of his products).

It's basically a variation of the false overhand shuffle found in "Royal Road to Card Magic." Very easy to do and looks pretty darn deceptive, I think, especially when followed by a couple of false cuts.
Message: Posted by: John C (Feb 6, 2004 06:57PM)
[quote]
On 2004-02-06 15:38, firewall wrote:
Which kind of "in the hand" (no table, please) shuffle do you use to mantain your stack and why?
[/quote]

I use an in the hands false shuffle and I use it because it maintains the stack! ;))

Sorry, I couldn't resist. Basically, you use what you can and most of the "whys" on it would be because they work and you are proficient at it. I don't know of one false shuffle that does it better than another really...I mean, as long as it's false.

Now, not to change the subject rather to analogize, I don't do a pass (ohhhhh, I can hear it com'n) to get a card to the top because I think there is way too much movement and theatrics to it. Instead I just use a double undercut. I can do the double undercut while the spectators watch my hands, no big deal. A couple undercuts and an overhand shuffle should do the trick to make them think that nothing is amiss.

I know there are some performers who can do the pass while spectators watch but I can't. I don't do any type of a pass.

I did learn a few great handling tips to make an overhand false shuffle look REALLY good. A good friend showed them to me. Very convincing. I always thought when this guy was performing he was a little clumsy but actually that's what he wants you to think.

It's all psychological (sic) I mean, while he shuffles, the cards are sticking out all over the place and he's always poking and pushing them in like they are really stuck or something. Like they are really woven together. But, they're not. It's a great convincer and you don't have to say anything while it's happening cause the actions speak for themselves.

I see people's faces are thinking, "Man, this guy doesn't seem to know what he's doing." You're always on the edge of your seat. You're always in his corner hoping that he succeeds. But you have your doubts.

I think it's better to perform this way than to be flourishy because it always throws people off. If you come out doing flourishes than they will watch you closer thinking, "Man this guy knows what he's doing; of course he's going to find my card." So, at this point it's just a matter of "I'll just sit back and watch this performer do his thing" instead of "Man, I hope this clumsy dude doesn't embarrass himself," whereby lowering the spectator's expectations and eventually, when you do pull the card out of wherever, you've blown them away.

Anyway, I know that that wasn't the subject but my point is that an addition to doing a shuffle false would be to do it clumsy and awkward. Make it really look difficult, not smooth.

You've got to work these spectators. Make them curious. Don't work smooth letting them think that you have practiced this many many times. Then they think that that's what is allowing you to be so good - the fact that you've practiced many many times and that's the only advantage you have over them. When we know the real advantage we have over them is that we are magic!!

Gotta go practice my false shuffles.

John Cesta
Message: Posted by: Jeff (Feb 6, 2004 07:03PM)
[quote]
On 2004-02-06 18:06, Photofnish wrote:
I've recently started doing Dan Harlan's "Underhanded Overhand Shuffle," which I learned through his "Top Ten" lecture notes, purchased directly from Mr. Harlan through his website (I e-mailed him, and he e-mailed me back with a listing of his products).

[/quote]
Photofnish, that would be Dan Garrett's Top Ten Lecture Notes, not Dan Harlan and yes this is a great in the hands full deck shuffle.
I have used the Optical Shuffle for years but I can't tell you where I learned it from.

Jeff
Message: Posted by: Nir Dahan (Feb 6, 2004 08:17PM)
The problem with the Dan Garrett shuffle (I hope I am not confusing it for another shuffle) is the strange grip of the left hand.
There is a very similar shuffle that can be done with a normal grip and without holding any breaks. I think I first saw it on Peter Duffie's site - but don't take my word on it.
Message: Posted by: playzure (Feb 6, 2004 08:30PM)
I think there is a great in the hands false shuffle in Card College books, most likely vol 3 but I'm not sure.
Message: Posted by: Photofnish (Feb 6, 2004 08:33PM)
My bad. Dan GARRETT is indeed the "Underhanded Overhand Shuffle" expert. Thanks for catching this, Jeff.