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Topic: Best places for reviews
Message: Posted by: MichaelDouglas (Oct 30, 2015 10:37AM)
For the SEO brains out there I need your thoughts.

It is commonly held that getting a review on Google + is the best place since Google indexes themselves very well.

However, not all of my clients use G+ and I don't want them to have to create a G+ account to leave me a review.

I know that Facebook has reviews now but Google doesn't index those.

Yelp is popular in certain regions but they won't share a review of you unless the reviewer is active on Yelp. If the only time Yelp has heard of the reviewer, they will not display the review but will list it in in obscure page called "Reviews not currently recommended".

So what are the best practices for getting reviews online?
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Oct 30, 2015 08:24PM)
What sort of show do you do?

I still think actual media coverage carries a lot more credibility than any other reviews.
Message: Posted by: MichaelDouglas (Oct 31, 2015 09:22AM)
Hi Danny.

I do kids shows, restaurant walk-around, and after dinner stand-up comedy magic. I use a separate site for the kids shows.

I 100% agree that media reviews are the best.
Message: Posted by: Close.Up.Dave (Nov 4, 2015 10:50PM)
Media coverages carries some great credibility, but it is simply used as credibility for the sake of the "show" part of show business (typically).

I would argue that you need a review on every major plaform; Yelp, Google, Gigmasters, Gigsalad, etc.

I have reviews on each of those platforms, some shows were large corporate, and other was a free show for my friend's charity. And yet, when people google my name now they see 5 star reviews on multiple platforms. Just the other day I had a prospect tell me that they kept seeing my name, so they googled it, and were happy to see 5 stars in the google feed.

You should aim to get at least one review on as many platforms as you can. People who are booking you for a show will want to see that many people trust you with their event.
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Nov 6, 2015 09:19AM)
Yelp reviews are #1 and by far the best source of reviews and high ranking. It's also off the radar for most performers.

Is it perfect? No.

But choosing to ignore it just because some reviews get hidden would be a huge mistake. Some hidden reviews become un-hidden over time. So what? Just keep piling up the reviews and watch your visibility and ranking in search pop through the roof. It's a numbers game.

Performer Frederic Da Silva in Vegas is a great example of a performer zigging while others zag. He's killing it with floods of Yelp and travel advisor reviews.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Nov 6, 2015 10:43AM)
[quote]On Nov 6, 2015, saysold1 wrote:
Yelp reviews are #1 and by far the best source of reviews and high ranking. It's also off the radar for most performers.

Is it perfect? No.

But choosing to ignore it just because some reviews get hidden would be a huge mistake. Some hidden reviews become un-hidden over time. So what? Just keep piling up the reviews and watch your visibility and ranking in search pop through the roof. It's a numbers game.

Performer Frederic Da Silva in Vegas is a great example of a performer zigging while others zag. He's killing it with floods of Yelp and travel advisor reviews. [/quote]

Aren't reviews of a running show in a theatre somewhat different that reviews of a performer for hire? I could understand the public seeking out reviews of a running show on Yelp or Trip Advisor if they are heading into a destination (Las Vegas, Orlando, Branson, etc.)

- Donald
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Nov 6, 2015 10:55AM)
Yeah, I too am not convinced that these types of reviews are helpful or carry any merit if the performer serves private markets or specific markets not geared to the public. For example, schools. These reviews would have little impact to the education market, whereas there are other places (industry) that you would be much better served.

Also I would rather have reviews from people in a booking or hiring position for the markets I serve, rather than just from an attendee or audience member.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Nov 6, 2015 01:41PM)
I tend to thing destination performance reviews are different animal than one night shows.
Message: Posted by: Tim Zager (Nov 6, 2015 03:10PM)
For SEO purposes, reviews account for about 10% of Google's overall ranking factors. In that 10%, these carry the most weight...
Google+ Local
Yelp
Foursquare
CitySearch
YP.com
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Nov 6, 2015 06:06PM)
Yelp keeps my phone ringing. So I like it - and it's free. Bookers may snoop at Yelp reviews as they pop up high in search.

I agree it's a different market than the DMC's and bookers but it actually generates as much or more leads as the paid sites - for me.

Frederic da Silva's secret sauce (having seen him at mindvention) was asking the entire audience multiple times for 5 star reviews on Yelp and trip advisor. Tacky? Sure. But very effective as you will see if you look him up on the site.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Nov 6, 2015 06:52PM)
TripAdvisor now has rules. Hotels are not allowed to mention reviews or they are removed from the site.

To me, and this is just me but having to basically beg during a show for a review is far more than tacky. It is fake and will bounce back and hurt you eventually. Especially if in your show you mention it so much people say to themselves "oh THAT is why he has so many reviews!" It will absolutely kill your word of mouth. It happens to hotels all the time.

Blowing yourself up with artificial reviews may help short term but as a business model I don't think it is smart.
Message: Posted by: saysold1 (Nov 8, 2015 06:37PM)
Totally agree Danny.

I saw Fredric's show with a group of performers and the multiple mentions during and at the end of the show were too much. But unquestionably effective apparently - at least for now.
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Nov 8, 2015 06:53PM)
How much of it is truly effective for him and how much is for personal gratification and ego? Does it translate to bookings in his target market?
Message: Posted by: inhumaninferno (Nov 8, 2015 07:23PM)
Obviously, there are right ways and wrong ways to improve your rankings in organic search. The right ways really have nothing to do with what many consider common sense. Conjecture will get you nowhere. Give Google what it wants and you will be rewarded. Hope that is vague enough for everyone!
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Nov 8, 2015 09:53PM)
By vage I hope you do not mean to imply incorrect. You are dead on.
Message: Posted by: inhumaninferno (Nov 9, 2015 05:10AM)
By vague, Danny, I mean imprecise.

Some of the most accurate info on this thread is from the OP.

An important question you should ask yourself is: Do you want to put your time, effort and $$$'s toward another company's site or would you rather invest in your own internet real estate?
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Nov 9, 2015 08:34AM)
Yea the whole hope someone searches for a magician and stumbles upon me thing is a complete mystery to me.
I have just never been a fan of that sort of business model.

I knew what you meant, I was complimenting your insight.
Message: Posted by: inhumaninferno (Nov 9, 2015 10:37AM)
Thanks Danny, I was just kind of erring on the side of caution.

I would not rely ONLY on that biz model. For those with the patience/$$$/etc to onboard it, it can be a solid part of the puzzle (so to speak).
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Jun 19, 2016 06:58PM)
[quote]On Nov 8, 2015, inhumaninferno wrote:
Obviously, there are right ways and wrong ways to improve your rankings in organic search. The right ways really have nothing to do with what many consider common sense. Conjecture will get you nowhere. Give Google what it wants and you will be rewarded. Hope that is vague enough for everyone! [/quote]

What does google want Inferno?
:sun:
Message: Posted by: 55Hudson (Jun 19, 2016 10:58PM)
Focusing on reviews for SEO purposes is only half of the story. I recently saw a study (within the past year - can't recall exactly) reporting that people in their 20's and 30's trust online reviews almost as much as recommendations from friends.

So if people are recommending you, then great! If not enough are recommending you, then online reviews are a good substitute. (Not as good, but close)

Hudson
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 19, 2016 11:33PM)
I don't get booked much by that demographic.
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Jun 19, 2016 11:56PM)
As always Danny, and thanks Hudson. I agree, word of mouth is optimal. But most of the locals where I am are booked via internet. And it appears the on line booking event planners are the go to for people. Heck, use to be event planners would often call me and get a quote. Seems they are dropping like flies these days.
Message: Posted by: Tim Friday (Jun 21, 2016 12:21PM)
I believe the online reviews are critical. I am surprised some here are stating that online reviews don't matter or they are not convinced they make a difference. I couldn't tell you how many times people have called me and said they read a review and wanted to get a quote.

Reviews are a great way to make you stand out from everyone else. If someone uses the internet when making a buying decision, they have access to online reviews and for many people the reviews are an important part of the decision process. This is the world we live in, I agree with everyone stating online reviews are important.
Message: Posted by: Tim Friday (Jun 21, 2016 12:22PM)
Does anyone have any tips about how to get set up on tripadvisor?
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 21, 2016 03:19PM)
Do a good show?

And if EVERYONE gets reviews online how exactly does this make you stand out?
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Jun 21, 2016 05:06PM)
I think they are referring to Gig Masters and Salad Danny. They continually change their system for pushing performers to the top....before, GM showed number of reviews, now they don't going by how much booking dollars you have. Making a buck, that is all that counts today, no matter if you work a gig for beans and build up your ratings. :hmmm:

Decomposing Talent But Will Work For Free
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Jun 21, 2016 05:08PM)
[quote]On Jun 21, 2016, Tim Friday wrote:
Does anyone have any tips about how to get set up on tripadvisor? [/quote]

You mean for a regular public stage show Tim?
Message: Posted by: Tim Friday (Jun 21, 2016 05:14PM)
[quote]On Jun 21, 2016, Decomposed wrote:
[quote]On Jun 21, 2016, Tim Friday wrote:
Does anyone have any tips about how to get set up on tripadvisor? [/quote]

You mean for a regular public stage show Tim? [/quote]

Just how do you get set up on there? Is it intended for regular public stage show? Tripadvisor only works for brick and mortar destinations?
Message: Posted by: MichaelDouglas (Jun 21, 2016 05:30PM)
Thanks for the insights everyone. I've had lots of gigs come because people read my reviews online. They see my name pop up on multiple sites and they then contact me. They do matter.

I do request an honest review from the booker after the show. I send them an email the following day with a link to where they create their review. Some don't bother, they just reply to the email and share their comments that way. Others just express their appreciation after the show verbally and they never provide anything written. I'd estimate that I get a review on one platform or another about 5% of the time.
Message: Posted by: 55Hudson (Jun 21, 2016 06:59PM)
Besides GigMasters and GigSalad, there are other sites where reviews can be hosted: Wedding Wire, Event Wire, The Knot, as well as local sites. You can also put testimonials on your website. All of these help. Certainly word of mouth is better, first hand experience is best.

I tell everyone I meet I'm a magician and am always happy to demonstrate. It's not often that this leads to a booking, but t has happened. One more gig I wouldn't otherwise have by mentioning magic instead of the weather.

Hudson
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Jun 21, 2016 08:20PM)
Great info gang. Yes Tim, I see Trip Advisor for those set up at a venue. I cant see how it would work for someone that goes to the client but hey, if you can make it work, I am all ears. Michael good insight, yeah sometimes it is difficult to get those reviews, even when they are very well pleased with your work. I tell them it is important to me and helps me...especially if it supplements my family income.

Hudson I use to put my website all over the place locally but then never did see it in searches. Those other places worth a look though! :yippee:
Message: Posted by: Ken Northridge (Jun 22, 2016 07:12AM)
I share the opinion that online reviews are important and I know Iíve been booked because of my reviews. Thereís something about someone else talking about your act instead of you talking about your act that resonates with a potential client. In fact, in some of my on line sites instead of listing a description of my act Iíll just post a recent testimonial!

It is true its becoming harder to stand out with online reviews because everyone is catching on. However, not everyone can consistently get 5 star reviews, if you know what I mean.

To answer the OP Iíve been focusing on google and facebook because I try to make it as easy for the customer as possible. For example, if the customer has a gmail email then I provide a google review link. They probably donít even have to sign in. Similarly, if they have a yahoo email Iíll provide my yahoo review link. Most people have facebook accounts, so thatís pretty easy too.

I just googled Ďreviews for Ken Northridge magicianí and here is the ranking:

#1 My web site
#2 My web site
#3 Gigmasters
#4 Yelp (even though I do not have one review on Yelp!)
#5 Google
#6 Facebook
#7 Facebook
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Jun 22, 2016 09:52AM)
[quote]On Jun 22, 2016, Ken Northridge wrote:
I share the opinion that online reviews are important and I know Iíve been booked because of my reviews. Thereís something about someone else talking about your act instead of you talking about your act that resonates with a potential client.[/quote]

That because their still is nothing better than direct word of mouth advertising. These online reviews as Ken points out are the online version of word of mouth recommendations.

That said, they risk they fact of being less effective as more performers start to use them and of course how some have even found ways to create their own online reviews under the guise of a satisfied customer. This can easily become just like testimonials have over the years, less effective and impactive, and often staged or created by the performer.

Social proof can be great, until everyone is socially proving the same things with the same messages. Then it becomes mass received and less effective.
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Jun 22, 2016 04:30PM)
Talent Agencies?
Message: Posted by: Tim Friday (Jun 22, 2016 04:39PM)
[quote]On Jun 22, 2016, Mindpro wrote:

That said, they risk they fact of being less effective as more performers start to use them and of course how some have even found ways to create their own online reviews under the guise of a satisfied customer. This can easily become just like testimonials have over the years, less effective and impactive, and often staged or created by the performer.

[/quote]

Yes, but the performer who does not get reviews will be left behind. The way I feel about reviews is almost the same way I feel when I deposit a check from a performance in the bank. Also during the decision making process I believe potential buyers pay attention to the total number or reviews, as well as are the reviews continually coming in? What are the recent dates of the last reviews and how frequently is this performer reviewed? This data is readily available to potential clients.
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Jun 22, 2016 06:15PM)
While I understand and can agree with your point to a certain degree, there are many performers who's business model and market have no basis on reviews one way or another. Again, as I said before, it depends on the performer, their markets they are targeting and who and where they are within this.

I don't feel performers without reviews have any less of an edge than those with raving reviews on a daily basis. I've read studies before that have indicated that people only read 1-4 reviews anyhow and that while it can provide support to their decision making, rarely is it solely the basis. I would rather see a performer with a very pin-pointed, effective and targeted website with the right components in the right layout, with absolutely no video or reviews, than the performer that had great reviews with only mediocre or wishy-washy content.

Also I also remember reading that people read reviews looking for certain information. For example in consumer markets one of the things it said they often look for is words like discount, low-priced, best price, free and extras. I would not want that to be the basis or deciding factors in their interest to book me. Also they look for same or similar content in reviews as their own interest. So if you do schools and one of your 15 reviews is from a school, the performer often thinks "I have 15 great reviews", when in reality perhaps only one is speaking to the prospect. Most just go for reviews with little or no regard for the psychological or emotional aspects of them, which is where the emphasis might really want to be.

Volume is not better.

The point or reviews like a website is to be effective and provide the predetermined, desired results. Also if it is the type of review where you have no control over the reviews, you can have 200 great reviews and three negative, poor or dissatisified reviews, studies have shown those three unfavorable ones leave a greater impression than all of the other ones. My point is reviews can be a double edged sword. In your promo, online image and representation, you should want as much control and input as possible. Some of these review vehicles do not allow that.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 22, 2016 06:28PM)
If you have zero bad reviews do you think any person doesn't have their bs detector go off?

People book me because they see me work. The only review is the show they are watching. I do not and have never done the one night show deal so I have no clue of their value to that market.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 22, 2016 06:31PM)
Also personally if would never blatantly ask for reviews. The entire "it helps me" thing seems more desperate than I am comfortable looking. I prefer to let the show speak for itself. If they review great, if not no biggie.
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Jun 22, 2016 10:01PM)
Yeah Danny but I think most are talking about the window low bid shopping like Gig Masters. Well, I should not say low bid but it seems most of the seekers seem to be wanting the best cost no matter the talent.

On the review side, what do you think they want. All firewall 5 star reviews? Or some mixed 4 star? You go on Gig Masters and 9 out of 10 it appears is all 5 stars. So what happens to a performer who gets a 4? Does he get ditched?
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 22, 2016 10:06PM)
I would never use the services so I don't know how it matters. Like I said people see me at a club or a resort or a theatre and they don't have to find reviews.
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Jun 22, 2016 10:24PM)
Again while everyone seems to be concerned with these types of reviews, it is what the pack is doing. I always said, there are other specific types of reviews that are valued far more than these types of reviews (that may be real or may be manufactured) that offers instant credibility and carries far more weight and can lend much more to your business and positioning. So while everyone is is following the leader to what likely is or will become less effective, the ones who seek other methods and resources will likely standout and find greater results.
Message: Posted by: Tim Friday (Jun 22, 2016 10:41PM)
Here's how I look at it - there have been many times when I have been considering making a purchase and when I researched online reviews they helped me in my decision making process. Some have been significant purchases for several hundreds of dollars and others might have been just a few dollars. Sometimes when researching the reviews I learned more info and I decided not to purchase an item. This could have been from a positive review. I often look at reviews when making purchases from Amazon or Audible.

The point is in our present day and time reviews are part of the process people use when making a purchase, whether it is to hire an entertainer or joining a gym or picking a dentist.

In my opinion, one of the fundamentals of marketing is seeing things from the point of view of a potential client. When you consider the deciding factor for a potential client could be the process of researching reviews, I believe they are critical and could be the deciding factor on whether I get contacted and/or hired. Online reviews have a direct impact on the results of my business.
Message: Posted by: Tim Friday (Jun 22, 2016 10:46PM)
I'm just curious, for anyone who out there who feels reviews are NOT very important, how would positive reviews hurt your business?
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 22, 2016 10:55PM)
I never said any such thing.

But you have a tendency to think your experience is universal. Not nearly everyone uses reviews to inform a purchase. I can name several other situations in which they never come into play. Online reviews have a direct impact on YOUR business. Not everyone is or has ru be set up that way.

Out of curiosity how long Jane you been in business?
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 22, 2016 10:56PM)
[quote]On Jun 22, 2016, Tim Friday wrote:
I'm just curious, for anyone who out there who feels reviews are NOT very important, how would positive reviews hurt your business? [/quote]

I am also curious as to how having a professionally shot and edited video can hurt your business?

Everyone can play that silly game so lets just not.
Message: Posted by: Tim Friday (Jun 22, 2016 11:27PM)
I also really appreciated the interview with Bill Gladwell posted here: http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=616534&forum=44

From Bill Gladwell Interview by William Rader
"You have a ton of 5 star reviews on TripAdvisor. What role does that play in getting people to attend your shows?

In the Gatlinburg area, it played a 90% role; on Hilton Head Island, it only plays a 60% role. In other words, 90% of my Gatlinburg ticket sales came from TripAdvisor; on Hilton Head Island, 60% of my ticket sales come from TripAdvisor. Depending on how prominent TripAdvisor is in your area, it may play a very large role in getting people to attend your shows."

What impressed me about this is that Bill knows his business so well that he has crunched the numbers and knows specifically the percentage that the reviews impact his business. And they make up a major percentage!

Maybe it's because I come from a background in sales, because to me knowing where your numbers come from and what impacts your numbers is a key factor to success.

For some reason I also have a certain respect for Bill for not posting here on Magic Cafť. In my opinion his is a professional approach and further shows he has nothing to prove and his results speak for themselves. In my opinion that makes all of us posting here on the Cafť nothing more than keyboard jockeys, haha, myself included.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 22, 2016 11:44PM)
Wow. Talk about disrespectful. Talk about negative tone. Wow I hope the hurt feelings crowd comes down on you for that.

Do you read your posts prior to hitting submit?

Sales background huh? How long have you been in the business of doing magic?
Message: Posted by: Tim Friday (Jun 22, 2016 11:55PM)
[quote]On Jun 22, 2016, Dannydoyle wrote:
Wow. Talk about disrespectful. Talk about negative tone. Wow I hope the hurt feelings crowd comes down on you for that.

Do you read your posts prior to hitting submit?

Sales background huh? How long have you been in the business of doing magic? [/quote]
Danny, my apologies, please allow me to clarify. It was not my intent to be disrespectful or post in a negative tone. My main point was to share a specific example of how reviews have made an impact on another performer's business. The quote was from a published interview. I will send you a PM in hope that I can make amends.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 23, 2016 12:01AM)
Don't.

Couple of things. First of all ANYONE in a theater can tell yoy EXACTLY where every ticket sold came from. It is the business. In Branson that is how you know where to target marketing dollars. It is a basic idea.

Good for Bill for knowing. Seems like he has success and that is admirable. But every successful theater show I have been involved with can and does do the same. Most ticketing software for the theater does that for you. You would have to try to not have that information.

Again I ask how long you have been in the business of performing magic for pay?
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Jun 23, 2016 01:17AM)
This is getting crazy. Shades of BB are coming trhough.

Tim you tend to take things greatly out of context to suit your needs. Bill works a very specific tourist market where reviews matter more than in most other typical markets, especially consumer markets. In that context, yes he knows his business. But he says things in that interview as they pertain to him in his specific market. The very same things would not necessarily work for him if he were to apply them in other markets. You seem to only focus on the parts you want to hear not the entire or greater context.

Bill will be lecturing soon in Las Vegas and I'm sure he'd be the first to tell you what he is discussing does not work across the board.

Also using something regarding reviews that should hit close to home for all of us here, how many times has there been a new magic trick, product or marketing book or course here that gets great rave reviews, then you decide to purchase it based on such reviews only to find out it is terrible, not as believed or simply doesn't apply or offer any value to you and your specific interests. It happens every singe day. Online people who have little or no place offering advice or reviews do so, only to find they have no idea what they're taking about or that it may only apply to them and their specific use.

There was also a study a couple of years ago by I think it was USA Today that went back to like 300 people who left online reviews to ask them if after having time to reflect on their review sentiments and experience if they would still say and claim the same thing the stated in their reviews. Only 30-some percent said they would. Reviews offered in the heat of the moment or just off of their experience can often be different from their actual reflections given time to think about it.

If you are basing your purchasing decisions on that of others, I have a bridge to sell you in Brooklyn. Purchasing decisions should be based on how they apply to you, your needs and interest and due diligence. You seem to be of the generation that thinks the online world (is gospel) with no personal interaction, youtube and the like are the way to operate. As stated elsewhere, it shows.

I listened to the Gladwell interview and thought it was greatly lacking and could have been much better. I have no problem with Bill at all and stating this in no ways discredits him or what he's doing. Also understand it hasn't been all roses for him as you might believe from this very limited interview.

Reviews can be terrible misleading and damaging and often can do more harm than good. Also all reviews are not created equal. I also think you are confusing what you THINK consumer do and use to make their decisions rather that what actually may be the reality.

Again you are passing your limited beliefs, experience and opinions off as sound advice and facts:

- the performer who does not get reviews will be left behind
- during the decision making process I believe potential buyers pay attention to the total number or reviews
- the point is in our present day and time reviews are part of the process people use when making a purchase, whether it is to
hire an entertainer or joining a gym or picking a dentist (this is not all the same as different processes and mentalities apply for
different things. It is not one size fits all as you seem to imply)
- online reviews have a direct impact on the results of my business (good for you but this is not universal across the board for every
performer in every performance market)
- It was not my intent to be disrespectful or post in a negative tone (it has come across exactly this way in each of your posts. Hey I got
scolded for this but I guess its acceptable from you with limited experience, knowledge and opinions. Double standards I guess.)

You "opinions" are quite welcome, it's when you offer them as sound advice in all applications to all performers, in all performance markets that it becomes something more than just an offered opinion. Especially based on such a brief amount of experience as a performer.

I hope you can understand the concern and issue here.
Message: Posted by: Ken Northridge (Jun 23, 2016 06:08AM)
For the record, Iím impressed with any working performing who can disregard online reviews, Gigmaster type site and online videoís. Thereís no question youíre doing something right. I have a similar respect for the guy who is successful but uses very few props in their show. But for us guys that need to cover all the bases hereís another thought:

I must admit, when Iím trying to reach a decision on purchase I will look for the 1 star and 2 star reviews (the dirt). When someone is that dissatisfied with their purchase thatís a red flag for me. And as I said earlier, its not EVERY performer who can CONSISTENTLY get glowing 5 star reviews.

I like the idea of online reviews. Its like competition, it makes us all better and the consumer is the winner.
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Jun 23, 2016 06:56AM)
I must admit I have dome this as well. It to me is usually more telling than the rave reviews. Telling in that you can more easily decide if it is a skewed or scorn customer with a vendetta (which it often can be), someone who doesn't truly get it themselves, or someone who was genuinely disappointed or who felt it lacked on the expectation meter.
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Jun 23, 2016 11:03PM)
I am sorry Danny. I didn't mean to offend if I did. You helped me a great deal way back in the AGT days. Anyway, I see firewall 5 star reviews from almost all performers on Gig Masters. Is this not a red flag? I certainly have 5 stars on there as well but if you use the drop down arrow, I have some 4s in there as well. I know when someone ask me to hold on the line for a review, I sometimes say okay. I don't always leave all 5s. Even when they are excellent. I think sometimes that all 5s shows a fix. I may be the odd ball but that is how I sees it.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jun 23, 2016 11:42PM)
That is the point.
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Jun 24, 2016 04:20PM)
But to performers looking at GigMasters they will see their firewall 5s as being better.....
Message: Posted by: Max Krause (Oct 21, 2016 11:34PM)
I have a 24 seat theatre right down the hall from my magic shop that I present live shows in up to 8 times a week depending on the season, my availability, or the availability of other performers. Almost all of my audience members have found me on Trip Advisor and it has had a tremendous impact on my business. I am adding a link here so you can see the real numbers.

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60933-d5995994-Reviews-Max_s_Magic_Theatre-Albuquerque_New_Mexico.html

I have never asked any of my friends or family to "pad" my reviews. Each and every review that you will read is from real people who have attended the show. I have my hostess tell the audience to add us on Facebook or review us on Trip Advisor or Yelp. I will also show you links for those as well for full transparency.

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/MaxsMagicTheatre/

Yelp:

https://www.yelp.com/biz/maxs-magic-theatre-albuquerque

Facebook has been great as well and I have reviews there too. Yelp would be the least beneficial at least in my personal experiences. Both Yelp and Trip Advisor were started by random audience members who then alerted me to both of them and then I went in and added more information and pictures once I claimed both pages as mine.

I also have a screen up when they sit down that has not only that information, but also has them download my Menta-List app for free for them to enjoy and when they finish having the effect performed for them my contact information is found at the end along with a link to my website. If you want to check that out you can download the app in the app store on your apple device and the app can be modified for your performances as well by contacting me for details.

Hope this helps a bit. Feel free to ask any questions you like either here or via PM if you prefer to keep things private.

Kind regards,
Max
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Oct 25, 2016 03:03AM)
Nice, I didn't even know FB had reviews, thanks Max.
Message: Posted by: Max Krause (Dec 27, 2016 05:08PM)
[quote]On Oct 25, 2016, Decomposed wrote:
Nice, I didn't even know FB had reviews, thanks Max. [/quote]

Happy I could help, sir!
Message: Posted by: CurtWaltermire (Jan 8, 2017 12:37PM)
I realize this thread is a bit old, but I was skimming it just now and thought perhaps I might add a bit of a different angle that I haven't seen mentioned here.

All arguments about the effectiveness and importance of online reviews aside...

Michael, since your original question is about collecting reviews (ostensibly for the sake of improving SEO if I'm correct), one thing I've found interesting about Google+ (though I'm not a big fan of it really) is that regular G+ posts show up in organic Google search results just like webpages do. Like it has already been shared, "Google likes Google" so it is good practice to give them what they want (i.e. use their services). I've experimented with this over the last several months and it does seem to generate some traffic for me that helps SEO. Nothing groundbreaking, necessarily, but noticeable even though temporarily.

What I mean is that by creating a Google + POST that is targeted to a search result (or term that is commonly used in your market in your area) you can achieve high first page results temporarily by doing so. Even hastagging it properly helps a little. I.e. a post that says "Best Kid's Show Magician in Atlanta" and then a link to your site or specific landing page with a few relevant hashtags (and a catchy picture) made as a simple POST will soon show up high in the results of searches for "kids show magicians atlanta" or whatever. Base the post on a hot, relevant search term and link to it. Think of it as creating a customized Google search result for people who are looking for the services you offer. Just make sure to provide a easy way (1 or 2 clicks) for them to find or contact you.

Unlike Facebook where people who are constantly plugging their services are soon ignored among their "friends" (and rightfully so, sheesh), your popularity on G+ among connections doesn't really seem to matter from what I've seen so you can post like this as frequently or infrequently as you want. Even posts that contain current or previous reviews made by clients works (even if you are adding them in yourself), or you can just start the review and link to your website's "Reviews" or "Testimonials" page for them to see more. Especially if your teaser sentence gets the fast attention of your targeted client such as "Bill Schmill's show was the best birthday party we've ever had for our kids..." or whatever.

Not a golden egg by any means, but I think useful to some degree when applied periodically, strategically, and regularly. Especially since it's free and only take a moment to do, and you can get as creative with it as you want.