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Topic: Aging photos
Message: Posted by: StreetWalkinCheeta (Jul 30, 2016 06:44PM)
First time posting so bear with me. I am wanting to do a routine that includes old photos that look really aged. You know to give that basic haunting effect. I am wanting to tell a story with particular historic figures from the 1800's. How would you go about printing and then aging these portraits say from a Google image search? Any help would be helpful.
Message: Posted by: Christopher Taylor (Jul 30, 2016 07:56PM)
Sepia tone your images; have them printed on heavy card stock by a printer (the guys who do business cards), NOT a regular photo printer; bend them to give some creases; experiment with strongly brewed tea to get the look you want. Cheers.

Christopher
Message: Posted by: Winks (Jul 30, 2016 11:46PM)
Do not age them too much. That mistake is made by too many. Most photos were stored in boxes or albums and not exposed to sunlight. The photos would age, but not like they had been left out in wind and rain. Sepia tone for photos before 1900, decreasing in intensity past 1880 when developers and fixers and emulsions improved. One of the best ways to age the photo card is J.E.Mosers Aniline Dye - the alcohol soluble one - Honey Amber Maple. Age with this more on the edges and lightly as you approach the photo. I would also not bend or crease the photos much at all. Photos were usually precious and well kept. And, while I respect Chris Taylor's props, I would not use tea or any water based stain - it warps the boards too much. Alcohol does not. Good luck.
Winks
Message: Posted by: Christopher Taylor (Jul 30, 2016 11:49PM)
Winks: Thanks for the the alcohol dye tip, excellent.

Christopher
Message: Posted by: friend2cptsolo (Jul 31, 2016 09:28AM)
Over aging becomes an issue when doing this.... Point made by Winks photos are generally kept in boxes or albums that keep the photo in good condition.
I have some old family photos
And yes glossy photos did not exist for that time period... also beveled edges were very popular. Also I noticed very different sizes....mostly squares like a 4x4
Message: Posted by: Christopher Taylor (Jul 31, 2016 12:54PM)
A note of clarification: the reason why I suggest using a printer rather than a photofinisher is the fact that these types of photos were generally printed on much heavier stock than is readily available from photo shops these days. Cheers.

Christopher
Message: Posted by: ProfessorMagicJMG (Jul 31, 2016 03:45PM)
There is a product line that is designed to age items for scrap booking and it is a spray ink, http://rangerink.com/?product=tim-holtz-distress-spray-stains
Look at Old Paper and Antique linen as good colors for aging paper.
Here are some other aging resources: http://www.favecrafts.com/Altered-Art/Aging-Antiquing-and-Distressing-Tools-Techniques-and-Tips
Also, Paul Pater has a book of bizarre routines using photographs, contact him at: http://www.paulprater.com
Message: Posted by: Pizpor (Jul 31, 2016 09:12PM)
If you have a Mac, the aged look for a photo can be done prior to printing with an app called Vintage Scene. If I recall correctly, it was about $5 or so and I have found it to be very useful. There are numerous effects you can apply such as wrinkling, creases, aged hues, antique borders and a lot more. Then its just a matter of printing on your home printer. Of course it all depends on what type of photo or document you're trying to make and how much scrutiny it will be under. The techniques already talked about are incredible.
Message: Posted by: Sir (Aug 3, 2016 11:29AM)
There is something to be said for how you store your aged photos after you have made them look old. If you were to search through my house, you would eventually come across aged photos in the strangest of places. They are in the attic and basement, yes, but also I have a few under an old leather couch, some more tucked away in really old books and national geographic magazines - I think there may even be one on top of a rarely-used celling fan blade.

What are they doing there?

Collecting dust, cobwebs and old smells. Spectators are using more than just their sight when interacting with our props. My philosophy is why not go the extra mile and give them the full sensory experience?
Message: Posted by: Silvertongue (Aug 23, 2017 12:15AM)
I have a 2 box stack of garage aged 70 yr old life magazines I use to add smell and grime to ephemera.
Message: Posted by: Wizard of Oz (Aug 23, 2017 07:58PM)
[quote]On Aug 3, 2016, Sir wrote:
There is something to be said for how you store your aged photos after you have made them look old. If you were to search through my house, you would eventually come across aged photos in the strangest of places. They are in the attic and basement, yes, but also I have a few under an old leather couch, some more tucked away in really old books and national geographic magazines - I think there may even be one on top of a rarely-used celling fan blade.

What are they doing there?

Collecting dust, cobwebs and old smells. Spectators are using more than just their sight when interacting with our props. My philosophy is why not go the extra mile and give them the full sensory experience? [/quote]

So awesome.