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Topic: Wooden suitcase
Message: Posted by: Raum (Apr 1, 2017 01:32PM)
Hi everyone.
I am an amateur and I'm thinking about getting a wooden old suitcase for my show.
I talked to the carpenter from my city, told him my wishes, and he gave me an approximate sketch with the sizes.But I'm not sure whether my desires are right and whether it will not create problems for me in the future. I will write my wishes here, and if you point out mistakes or give advice - I will be very grateful to you.
1) The bottom of the suitcase will be made of oak, compartments and the lid - from plywood.
2) The whole suitcase will be aged, leather straps will be attached to it, the handle will also be leather.
3) I would like to see a "Ouija board" painted on the lid of the suitcase. I think it will look nice, and I can use it in my show like single effect or like backup
4) The size of the suitcase is 45 cm by 55 cm. The depth is 7.5 cm. Big compartments is suitable to fit a notepad a3. I think the notepad is useful to me if I perform in front of a large audience.
5) The rest compartments serve to keep all small items there. Like Tarot Cards, crystal balls, pendulums, envelopes and etc.
The first image is a similar suitcase. The second is a sketch.
[url=https://ibb.co/nf8rTv][img]https://thumb.ibb.co/nf8rTv/Wooden_box.jpg[/img][/url] [url=https://ibb.co/eDNJ8v][img]https://thumb.ibb.co/eDNJ8v/f_C76_EMvq_Mzw.jpg[/img][/url]
Message: Posted by: MentalistCreationLab (Apr 1, 2017 03:05PM)
Putting the Ouija board on the outside may look fine for visual display but you may be better off to make the case big enough to hold the board in the lid of the case. Just a thought. Also if you building a case for a specific show then build it with the show in mind leaving a little space for add on items. If you building a case for general stuff then have a plan as to what will fit the most stuff. I am telling you this form experience over the years its best to build the case for specific reasons in most cases than to go about this haphazardly as in the end you have something you can use for years to come. Also do not use cheap materials.

I built many of these over the years and sold off some of them in the past when I realized I did not include something important. Just saying think long and hard about what you want then get exactly what you want and no lees.
Message: Posted by: Raum (Apr 1, 2017 04:21PM)
This suitcase is for general. I just do not like metal or plastic, they are some "soulless" and do not fit into my image of a person who reads thoughts.
Message: Posted by: bowers (Apr 2, 2017 09:29AM)
Hi Raum
I bought one that looks very close to your picture.
From Hobby Lobby and only paid about 25 bucks for it.
I love mind and it is also aged.It doesn't have any dividers
in it but they could be added easy enough.
Todd
Message: Posted by: Raum (Apr 2, 2017 05:06PM)
I would like a better quality, it's just remotely similar, nothing more. The main thing that excites me - maybe this suitcase is too big? If I perform in a room where the suitcase will have to be put on a chair, then the standard suitcase will lie perfectly on the chair. But this one will stick out at half and probably will not be stable.
Message: Posted by: George Hunter (Apr 2, 2017 08:32PM)
Raum:

I like your suitcase idea, and the photo, but some (or many) of us carry our stuff in a catalog case. Richard Osterlind gives the reasons for this in his Field Manual for mentalists. You should be able to get a good leatherette or corduroy nylon catalog case for less than $100.00. They have several convenient compartments and sections, and being able to access all of your props from the top is a plus compared to having to open a horizontal suitcase. You can see a range of useful catalog cases at a place like Staples or Office Depot, or do an internet search.

George
Message: Posted by: Magical Dimensions (Apr 3, 2017 08:06AM)
[quote]On Apr 2, 2017, George Hunter wrote:
Raum:

I like your suitcase idea, and the photo, but some (or many) of us carry our stuff in a catalog case. Richard Osterlind gives the reasons for this in his Field Manual for mentalists. You should be able to get a good leatherette or corduroy nylon catalog case for less than $100.00. They have several convenient compartments and sections, and being able to access all of your props from the top is a plus compared to having to open a horizontal suitcase. You can see a range of useful catalog cases at a place like Staples or Office Depot, or do an internet search.

George [/quote]


I think that maybe he has a different idea than to be like everyone else. I believe that he is going with what he sees his character to be. I have an Elephant bag (a term that was used in the Army in the last unit that I was in) and I have never used it for mentalism. An elephant bag is the same as an catalog case.

I like using a doctor bag that is 30 years old and a little beat up. Why? Because I want to be different for one thing.

The suitcase can be used to good results. I would also place pockets and areas inside of the lid to place things in. Think of a mixture of a suitcase and a brifecase.

Then dress with just a hint of being a little odd, different, interesting, so that he can stand out from the crowd in a good way so that it will enhance his character. But I can already hear people saying, "Mentalism is done wearing a suit and tie at paid gigs. After all that is what (fill in the name) does"... Now, I didn't say dress like a weirdo. I said dress with a hint of being interesting.


R
Message: Posted by: TEB3 (Apr 3, 2017 09:26AM)
Think about Dr. Jaks and his book.

TEB3
Message: Posted by: Magical Dimensions (Apr 3, 2017 12:16PM)
[quote]On Apr 3, 2017, TEB3 wrote:
Think about Dr. Jaks and his book.

TEB3 [/quote]

Oh Yes, I forget about his book that he called, "The Book of Mystery". Thanks for bringing that up...



Ray
Message: Posted by: Maxyedid (Apr 4, 2017 03:25PM)
I'm a HUGE fan of Dr Jaks... I bought once a wooden box that looks like a book on the outside. I don't know the name for this but it's a fairly common home-decoration home thing were I live (I don't know if someone actually uses this in his house, but it's fairly common to see it in stores...)

Dear Raum: your case looks very beautiful. Is it not too heavy?
Message: Posted by: Maxyedid (Apr 4, 2017 03:32PM)
I just did a search in amazon for "wooden old suitcase" and there are some very cool things indeed... have you tried that yet?
Message: Posted by: Raum (Apr 4, 2017 04:15PM)
Not, no so much. It will not be entirely of oak.
I would say that he is 80% similar to Spiritus Magnus Case.
I was looking there, but Amazon does not sell unique items, only mass-produced items. But I found on ebay two stores that sell unique old things, including wooden suitcases or trunks.If you interested:
http://stores.ebay.co.uk/Vintage-Interior-Products?_trksid=p2047675.l2563
http://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/nick1974selling?_trksid=p2047675.l2559
Message: Posted by: Tony Thomas (Apr 6, 2017 08:19PM)
One thing I would think about is access to the case during a performance. I like a case that opens typically, like yours, and also has an alternative opening method. Picture a piano hinge down the middle of the case top, allowing the flat part of the case to open by folding over on itself, which creates a small performing area, or place to set things during a routine. Also, this allows access into the box in the middle of a routine, to ditch things, or pick something up (with a hold out), etc. Half of the case top is a performing area, and half is open access into the box.

Another thing to think about is the depth of the box. I started with a box that looked like a suitcase. But then progressed to a similar design, but the case was deeper and more the size of a small trunk. This allows tall things to fit in the box, like a crystal silk cylinder or stratosphere.

Finally, I would never perform by putting a case on a chair. I would make the case set on a stand of some sort, either a TV tray type stand (busker style), or a music / cymbal stand. There are lots of typical options.

One last comment... I would keep the outer design something that appeals to all audiences. Many parents would not let their children play or interact with ouji boards. Might create distance to some in your audience for little gain. There are design options that are equally cool and not offensive to anyone. Good luck.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Apr 6, 2017 09:07PM)
Forget using oak, that is a waste of money, and oak will make it to heavy. Just use good birch plywood. Get a restaurant waiters stand, and the have a cloth sewn so it goes over the opened lid, with your name in big letters on it.
Message: Posted by: Dick Oslund (Apr 11, 2017 06:19PM)
The young man whom I am mentoring, asked about buying or making a prop case that he could work out of. (Ha! another Charlie Miller! (I finished the sentence with a preposition.)

He had studied my DVD, which in one show, shows me working out of a small case. All the props for the entire 45 minute program, except the mutilated parasol, which travels in a zipper nylon "tube", are in the small case.

The case is never unpacked. Props are in "pigeon holes", and, are picked up, the trick is performed, and the prop(s)are replaced.

There is NO DITCH BAG! IMHO, ditch bags are for those who don't PLAN! Some props "double" in different routines. One of the silks used in the color change, is also used in the ball routine. The long rope for Professor's Nightmare, is used for the Ovette knot, several rope/knot bits, and the YOYO. There is a second long rope for the Lazy Magician routine, which is used to pad out the 45 minute school assembly program, to the 60 minute evening family show.

I told Colton that he should first assemble all the props needed for his act, and draw up a plan showing where each prop would be. Then, walk through the act, MENTALLY, to see if the various props go in and out without any problems. Then, make a cardboard case of the appropriate dimensions, and, make cheap simple paste board pigeon holes. Install the props, and, rehearse the act. If there are no problems. build or buy a case of appropriate size. Install good pigeon holes, for the props. When he had done all the planning and rehearsing, he needed a case about the size of mine. I had a spare case of those dimensions. I'm retired. I gave him my spare!

Now, use the case for a few shows. Make notes after each show, and, make minor adjustments as needed. If after a half dozen shows, EVERYTHING "works". you are ready to hit the road.

To build a roof for your new home, BEFORE you build the foundation, and framework of the house, would seem rather foolish to me. The OP seems to be overly concerned with the prop case. He hasn't even mentioned the props! I think he is making the roof before the foundation and the walls.

Karrell Fox was "framing" his "W.C. Fields" act for the college circuit. To add "character" to the act, after, he had the props "set". He bought a small trunk. He decorated the exterior with HOTEL STICKERS to suggest an old vaudevilian's trunk. During the show, the trunk "sat" on a luggage rack that looked like a short waiters' tray stand. I know, 'cuz I provided the hotel labels which I had picked up on a European vacation tour.

(I had decorated the doves' road case with similar labels. When the kids asked about the labels, I explained that the doves went on their own vacation, without me!)

Karrell worked out of the trunk. When the show was over, He could close the lid, and haul it to the car.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Apr 12, 2017 01:27PM)
Clearly, Raum, has not given any thought to why he even needs a case. The show material he mentions are all down on the table materials, and mostly close-up props. The fact that he wants to have a Ouija board on the top of the lid, is proof, this is a close up case. All the items mentioned should be carried in his pockets, not in a box, as that only draws suspicion to everything he will use in his mentalism Occult performance.

Being he has not been back to clarify anything, I think it would be good for him to learn from experience. I don't know where he thinks he is going to put a huge suitcase while people are eating, but I am sure he will figure it out.

For someone that lives in Europe, why he refuses to visit all the vintage stores, is really a mystery. I am sure he could find a suitable case in a place that prides themselves on history and vintage items that were part of everyday life.
Message: Posted by: Chatterbox41 (Apr 27, 2017 06:03AM)
[quote]On Apr 11, 2017, Dick Oslund wrote:

I told Colton that he should first assemble all the props needed for his act, and draw up a plan showing where each prop would be. Then, walk through the act, MENTALLY, to see if the various props go in and out without any problems. Then, make a cardboard case of the appropriate dimensions, and, make cheap simple paste board pigeon holes. Install the props, and, rehearse the act. If there are no problems. build or buy a case of appropriate size. Install good pigeon holes, for the props.

Now, use the case for a few shows. Make notes after each show, and, make minor adjustments as needed. If after a half dozen shows, EVERYTHING "works". you are ready to hit the road.

To build a roof for your new home, BEFORE you build the foundation, and framework of the house, would seem rather foolish to me. The OP seems to be overly concerned with the prop case. He hasn't even mentioned the props! I think he is making the roof before the foundation and the walls.

Karrell Fox was "framing" his "W.C. Fields" act for the college circuit. To add "character" to the act, after, he had the props "set". He bought a small trunk. He decorated the exterior with HOTEL STICKERS to suggest an old vaudevilian's trunk. During the show, the trunk "sat" on a luggage rack that looked like a short waiters' tray stand. I know, 'cuz I provided the hotel labels which I had picked up on a European vacation tour.

(I had decorated the doves' road case with similar labels. When the kids asked about the labels, I explained that the doves went on their own vacation, without me!)

Karrell worked out of the trunk. When the show was over, He could close the lid, and haul it to the car. [/quote]


Wonderful information from a Pro! Thanks Dick!

I remember when I first read Ganson's books on close up magic and saw the section on using a brief case for a close up case. I bought a cheap brief case at Wal-Mart and actually fit 2 45 minute close up shows in that little case including a place for an old cassette player, a couple cassettes for each show, a set of cups and a chop cup, etc. Good planning can make performing a simple pleasure!

Later, that same case served to hold my complete stand up show with room to spare.

Gary
Message: Posted by: Dick Oslund (Apr 27, 2017 08:43AM)
Thank you, Gary, for your most kind words!

Yup! PLANNING is the KEY! To have a smooth running act, having no awkward stalls is critical to one's success. EVERY prop, must be instantly accessible! (Time, timing, and TEMPO!). --When doing 3-4 shows per day, the need to sort out the stuff in a ditch bag, before the next show, is a WASTE OF TIME! ("Time is $$$$!)

I vividly remember, about 40 years ago, when I experimented with a "suitcase table". It was a Merv Taylor case, somewhat like a "Lefler" case. I had taken a two week vacation to go deer hunting in Upper Michigan. I didn't manage to get a deer! --I sat on a stump in the woods, and, MENTALLY "walked" through the 45 minute act, planning the storage, handling, and restoring of EACH prop!

When I hit the road, later, I had not a single problem. I did go back to my little case and waiter's tray stand, though. That @#$% suitcase table weighed more than the props!!! (Chiropractors charge $$ for "adjustments"!)
Message: Posted by: Chatterbox41 (May 2, 2017 05:56AM)
Dick, I know what you mean! I have a suitcase table in the attic... hasn't been used in probably 35 years.

I bought a waiters tray stand and made a wooden top that fits it exactly. Looks great on stage. If I want to do close up, a pad fits nicely too. And also have used the stand when doing my vent act to hold the suitcase. Much more portable (and cheaper) than a suitcase table!

Gary
Message: Posted by: Dick Oslund (May 2, 2017 08:47AM)
Yeah!

In a thrift shop in Illinois, about 20 years ago, I found a waiter's tray stand TYPE of table for about $5.00. It's about 27" tall. With my "fat attache" prop case (13" x 20" x 8") it's 35" tall. I'm about 5" 10 and a 1/2" tall. (I was 6', but, as I've aged, I've "shrunk". (Maybe I stand in the shower too long! hee hee!) 35" is just fine, as, no props "work" on a table top. The lid is opened when I start, and stays open throughout the act.

The "table" from the thrift shop had a metal tray which sat on the top, and must have "had a use" for someone! I red lighted the tray! A few years later at one of the "flea markets" at Abbott's Get Together, I found another to match. IIRC, I paid $10.00 for it. It was useful when I did the 60 minute evening show in schools, and, wanted a few "flash props" like the tambourine silk production. The case which carried the silks AND, the tambourine rings, and a small table top, added FLASH to the show, and were well worth the extra two pieces to load in and out!

About two years before I retired from the road, I found an old "waiter tray stand" TYPE of table. It had been used for a 35mm slide projector (remember those?). I stripped all the electrical stuff, and had big casters installed.

When I got inside the school, I could "open" the table, set the prop case on top, and push it down the hall to the auditorium or gymnasium. I was 76 on that last tour in 2008, and appreciated not having to carry that 22 lb prop case!!!
Message: Posted by: Magical Dimensions (May 18, 2017 07:32AM)
This is all common sense. Planning is what I call blocking.... Anyone that has walked the boards long enough, just knowns about creating an act where you can set up in ten minutes and once a prop has been used, it goes right back in the same spot in the case or in a pocket to keep the flow of the act moving. You leave out routines where you have to make or construct things the night before.. This way your act is set and ready to rock and roll. Do your program, close the lid (after you empty a pocket or two) and you are now ready to do another program. No fuss at all.


Many entertainers set a trunk type of box on a table with a chair in front. And work that way.

As far as the guy in an earlier post stating that he would never place his case/bag on a chair, he is thinking like a magician. So it would be out of place for him to do so. I guess this thinking comes from working with a magic table all the time. But for a mentalist, this is common practice to place their bag/case on a chair. Using everyday items is an element that a mentalist wants.

Someone also hit on the idea of placing things on their person. This is common sense again but worth talking about. Run through your act to block it. Stop at the end of each routine and noticed where you are. Are you now up front and commanding the stage/platform? Do you really have to return to your case/box/trunk? Can you place items that you are holding in a pocket and work from another pocket to create an on going balance to your act? Or if you return to your case and replace your item, can you just walk forward as you go into your transition and simply start your next routine by removing an item from your pocket or secertly get to it? I like to work from the base of getting props (lack for a better word) and going south with the idea of it being almost invisible. I have a friend who would move so naturally from one routine to another, that it seem like some of his props simply appeared from thin air. I admired the thinking.

I like the idea of not having to go to your case/box for every routine. To me it becomes, the (in this case) magician and his case/box. You need to block or as others have said, plan, your program so that everything has a flow to it.

Ever after all these years I still use what I call a dummy sheet. There have been times where I only had minutes to set up and do a sound check.. Here is what I mean, and once again it is just common sense..... When I did magic, I would open my table or case and remove two pieces of paper. On one there would be a drawing of my case or table with all the props and where they go. I would look at the paper and then quickly check to see if the prop was in fact in that location in my case or table. I could check my act in seconds without the fear of missing something. Once that was done, I looked at the other paper. Their I had a drawing of my trousers, short, vest and jacket. Off to the side I have listed props with lines and arrows pointing to where they go on my person. With a quick pat down, I knew that I had everything in place and could now concentrate on something else if I needed to. Was this Overkill? I don't think so. It just a few moments, I was 100% sure that my act was set and ready to go. Might sound goofy, but it is what it is.


Ray
Message: Posted by: Rook (May 22, 2017 05:15PM)
I recall looking all over for the 'perfect' carrying for my character, and a wooden suitcase seemed to work wonderfully. Alas, the cost to have something made to my specs was a bit more than I was willing to lay out. Decorative suitcases seemed to be a bit flimsy and actual antique cases were generally in poor enough condition to where I wasn't confident in entrusting my show. In the end, I found that a newer catalog case with travel stickers (purchased cheaply enough on Amazon) aged with teabags worked quite well.

I suppose where I'm going is where many of you already were. Rather than reinventing the wheel, modify what already works.
Message: Posted by: Raum (May 22, 2017 07:10PM)
I bought an old looking leather suitcase from ebay. I discover two shops that specialise on restoring and selling old leather things. I decided to cancel my order of wooden suitcase because leather suitcase looked much better. Thank you all for your suggestions.
Message: Posted by: daav0 (Jun 21, 2017 07:15AM)
I found a 1941 Doctor's bag at a local swap meet for $20. I then had a local leather guy refurb it for $160 and it is in great great condition. The top swivels open to two closed compartments on each side and the bottom is deep and holds a lot of stuff. I normally put a tech caddy inside of that and larger apparatus. For bigger parlor shows I carry an old (1940's) striped tweed suitcase and wrap all the apparatus in black bags made out of dishtowels.I will put some photos up soon.
Message: Posted by: Rook (Jun 21, 2017 10:10AM)
[quote]On Jun 21, 2017, daav0 wrote:
I found a 1941 Doctor's bag at a local swap meet for $20. I then had a local leather guy refurb it for $160 and it is in great great condition. The top swivels open to two closed compartments on each side and the bottom is deep and holds a lot of stuff. I normally put a tech caddy inside of that and larger apparatus. For bigger parlor shows I carry an old (1940's) striped tweed suitcase and wrap all the apparatus in black bags made out of dishtowels.I will put some photos up soon. [/quote]


I must confess to turning a bit green with envy! Looking forward to the photos!
Message: Posted by: MentalMik (Jul 31, 2017 11:41PM)
[quote]On Jun 21, 2017, daav0 wrote:
I found a 1941 Doctor's bag at a local swap meet for $20. I then had a local leather guy refurb it for $160 and it is in great great condition. The top swivels open to two closed compartments on each side and the bottom is deep and holds a lot of stuff. I normally put a tech caddy inside of that and larger apparatus. For bigger parlor shows I carry an old (1940's) striped tweed suitcase and wrap all the apparatus in black bags made out of dishtowels.I will put some photos up soon. [/quote]

I'd like to see the photos too. I once had a vintage Gladstone doctors bag, wish I had kept it.
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Aug 27, 2017 04:30PM)
My small props for my walk around shows can all fit into pockets while I perform and a good part of my shows require that I wear a tuxedo or a performance jacket.

Walking in carring a catalog case or a suitcase in my opinion kills the fascinating aura of mystery, awe, and power of a mentalist.

I have decided to carry my props to a show in a violin case, it's classy and perfectly fits the wearing of formal clothing; everyone thinks I'm part of the orchestra when I walk in and are presently surprised when I persent myself as the evenings entertainment
Message: Posted by: paul180 (Sep 14, 2017 02:49AM)
At one time I used and a wooden artist case similar to this one http://www.thebrokentoken.com/unfinished-wooden-artist-case-and-organizer-set/ It was unfinished so I could do what I want with it. All the dividers made storing things a breeze.
Message: Posted by: Dick Oslund (Sep 14, 2017 07:14AM)
[quote]On Jun 21, 2017, daav0 wrote:
I found a 1941 Doctor's bag at a local swap meet for $20. I then had a local leather guy refurb it for $160 and it is in great great condition. The top swivels open to two closed compartments on each side and the bottom is deep and holds a lot of stuff. I normally put a tech caddy inside of that and larger apparatus. For bigger parlor shows I carry an old (1940's) striped tweed suitcase and wrap all the apparatus in black bags made out of dishtowels.I will put some photos up soon. [/quote]

Aha! You must be at least 200 years old!!!

In the beginning of the 'age of science', most of the magicians had been working in the streets, or village square. It was time for a change! The buskers had their suit cleaned and pressed, put on a clean shirt, and, became 'doctors' and 'professors'!

Instead of performing a 'show', they demonstrated 'experiments in high class prestidigitation and illusionary science'. In the parlor of their host, a table was set, 'upstage center'. The table could be borrowed, covered with an elaborately decorated velvet cloth, or a beautifully made and decorated table (complete with 'trap doors', as needed). Two tripod 'plant stands' were placed 'down left, and down right". Crystal glass and beautifully decorated tubes and boxes, cans and pans, had now become 'PARAPHERNALIA, AND APPARATUS which were used to demonstrate the experiments, and the APPARATUS for each 'experiment' could be moved to the plant stands, for the 'experiment' and returned to the center 'laboratory' table, when the experiment was completed. The pace of living was much slower 'in those days', so relatively few 'experiments' could provide an evening's entertainment.

TIMES HAVE CHANGED! In the 'theater', PROPS are used in the PERFORMANCE of TRICKS! We aren't 'professors' or 'doctors' anymore!

In those ancient days, transportation was a horse drawn wagon over primitive roads. In the vaudeville era, baggage cars on a train was the common means of moving the show, 'down the road'. It was necessary to pack the PROPS, carefully in little cloth bags, to insure that they wouldn't arrive at the next town, in pieces!

When I began performing, in the mid '40s, many magicians carried a center table, and two side tables (tripods) and, packed the PROPS in little cloth bags. C.Thomas Magrum, at one point in the late '40s and early '50s schlepped into the school, (Clem was a school show magician) ten cases of props, for a Lyceum program. Set up time was at least 30 minutes, and pack up time, the same, for a 50 minute program. When I was 18 (1950) I visited for a day or two on the show. "We" did as many as FOUR SHOWS IN ONE DAY, IN DIFFERENT SCHOOLS (not always in the same town!)!!!

When I 'turned full time pro. in the mid '60s, I had been trouping the 'apparatus' (!!!!!) in little cloth bags, in several cases, with several tables onstage. That, was changed, before I hit the road!

I wrote up my prop case "situation" above in this thread. I averaged at least 13 programs a week. I often did 16 and 17! $show bu$ine$$ is a bit different than it was in the 1700s!

At cardician Jon Racherbaumer's insistence, I wrote a book about my life on the road, playing the 'knowledge boxes' on the 'kerosene lamp circuit'. (Yes, it's still in print, and I've mailed copies to four different CONTINENTS.
Message: Posted by: Dick Oslund (Sep 14, 2017 03:33PM)
[quote]On Apr 6, 2017, Bill Hegbli wrote:
Forget using oak, that is a waste of money, and oak will make it to heavy. Just use good birch plywood. Get a restaurant waiters stand, and the have a cloth sewn so it goes over the opened lid, with your name in big letters on it. [/quote]

Right Bill! I was using an attache case way back in the '60s. Then I picked up somewhere and old Ireland "1944 "YEARBOOK". Frances Marshall suggested a "slip cover", somewhat like a pillow case, to flash the lid of the case when opened up. I have used that sort of "flash cover" ever since. Abbott's usta sell gold plastic letters (made of "drum shell material) that were easy to glue on the cloth.
Message: Posted by: Dick Oslund (Sep 14, 2017 03:43PM)
Someone noted above that he wouldn't put his case on a chair. JAY MARSHALL, for about the last half of his life, never carried, or borrowed, a table. He borrowed a chair, for club dates when he needed to do 30 minutes. If he was doing 10 - 15 minutes, he had everything on his person (including his 5 rings--in a cloth bag that hung on his back.)E He could access the rings with one hand.

Everything else was in his pockets.
Message: Posted by: Cleverpaws (Sep 18, 2017 11:14AM)
Here's a small close-up case I made for a magician. He had a larger case but wanted this to be small enough that he could put inside a suitcase when traveling. It keeps the items secure, and organized.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/it6pmmj9m24z5bv/Closeupcasefilled.png?dl=0

This photo shows the color of the case much better.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/w4ctsme17iv243d/Closeupinteriorempty.png?dl=0
Message: Posted by: Rook (Sep 20, 2017 01:14AM)
Lovely work!
Message: Posted by: Cleverpaws (Sep 20, 2017 01:42PM)
Thanks!
Message: Posted by: equivoque (Aug 22, 2018 11:47AM)
The real answer, which no one wants to hear, is get a table for each type of show that you do. I have a Hank Moorehouse cube and ultimate table base for small shows and strolling, a 10 Second Table for medium size shows and a Lefler Suitcase table that can be used in combination with the other two for larger shows.

For the Life of me, I cannot understand why anyone carries a table that does not hold props. (unless you have a large stage show.) The cube table can be adjusted to table height at restaurants for strolling. I consider putting your props next to someone's food to be bad form. (This is just an opinion.) Once I had my mind power deck ruined by a spectator who was so excited, she split her water and I learned a valuable lesson.

I live in a COOP in Brooklyn and next week, any props that do not fit into these tables is going into my basement storage unit!