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Topic: Chrome vs. Nickel cup finish?
Message: Posted by: Chris.Z (Oct 10, 2018 02:31PM)
Am plotting a new set of RNT cups. (Foxy 3's) I like the silver look for this set, but I'm wondering what's the difference between the Chrome and the Nickel finish? Any preference one way or the other?
Message: Posted by: Mobius303 (Oct 11, 2018 07:27PM)
Ask Donnie
Message: Posted by: ringmaster (Oct 12, 2018 04:54PM)
Only pimps carry chrome.
Gen. George Patton
Message: Posted by: Chris.Z (Oct 14, 2018 01:19PM)
[quote]On Oct 12, 2018, ringmaster wrote:
Only pimps carry chrome.
Gen. George Patton [/quote]


I can't tell if that's meant to be an endorsement or not.
Message: Posted by: Mad Jake (Oct 16, 2018 05:49PM)
The difference is that a Nickel plated cup has a chromium plating over top of the Nickel. 2 factors play into the Chromium coating, 1 you won't need to polish the Nickel as it will patina black, 2. and this is the most important
a large percentage of the population is allergic to Nickel, the Chromium coat will make them safe to handle when applied right.

Jake Jr.
Message: Posted by: Grey (Oct 18, 2018 10:20AM)
[quote]On Oct 12, 2018, ringmaster wrote:
Only pimps carry chrome.
Gen. George Patton [/quote]

I was interested in this quote, and did a little looking for the context he used it in. He may have been answering a question about his own handguns.

Here is a different version of the quote:

Son, only a pimp in a Louisiana *** house carries pearl handled revolvers, these are ivory.

No reference to chrome though.

🍻
Message: Posted by: KeithP (Nov 7, 2018 06:14PM)
A mirror chrome finish on a cup may expose a palmed ball in its reflection during performance.
Message: Posted by: Mobius303 (Nov 8, 2018 08:35PM)
It could but I have never found that to be a problem. Others have in the past.
If you video a practice session then you can adjust your hand position to not expose at the wrong moment or at any moment.
The size of your working surface also allows for proper blocking of the hand position to not expose or reflect in the mirror surface.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Dec 20, 2018 11:47PM)
I know Pop Haydn recommends abound for chrome plated linking rings as they chrome will chip and flake off. Is that a concern with chrome plated cups?
Message: Posted by: Mad Jake (Dec 23, 2018 01:05AM)
[quote]On Dec 21, 2018, imgic wrote:
I know Pop Haydn recommends abound for chrome plated linking rings as they chrome will chip and flake off. Is that a concern with chrome plated cups? [/quote]

I'm using my fathers chromed cups that are 20 years old and look brand new. The life span of the nickel and chrome plating depends on the actual application
of the plating. An old method called the Cyanide Copper Strike is the key factor in longevity and life of the plating. There are not many platers in the US that still
use the Cyanide Strike due to EPA regulations.

Our plater still uses the Cyanide striking application and that is why all my father's chromed cups have lasted as long as they do, thanks to the plater. You can
have your cups plated for as little as 5.00 per cup or up to 70.00 per cup. You get what you pay for.
-MJJ
Message: Posted by: imgic (Dec 29, 2018 10:47PM)
[quote]On Dec 23, 2018, Mad Jake wrote:
[quote]On Dec 21, 2018, imgic wrote:
I know Pop Haydn recommends abound for chrome plated linking rings as they chrome will chip and flake off. Is that a concern with chrome plated cups? [/quote]

I'm using my fathers chromed cups that are 20 years old and look brand new. The life span of the nickel and chrome plating depends on the actual application
of the plating. An old method called the Cyanide Copper Strike is the key factor in longevity and life of the plating. There are not many platers in the US that still
use the Cyanide Strike due to EPA regulations.

Our plater still uses the Cyanide striking application and that is why all my father's chromed cups have lasted as long as they do, thanks to the plater. You can
have your cups plated for as little as 5.00 per cup or up to 70.00 per cup. You get what you pay for.
-MJJ [/quote]

I did not realize that. Thank you for explaining.
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Sep 25, 2019 10:33PM)
Rings take a lot more of a beating than a cup ever would. Most chrome rings will hold up fine. Some can chip for the reasons Mad Jake mentioned.
Message: Posted by: plungerman (Nov 14, 2019 05:07PM)
I would consider where you are performing as well. As attractive as cups can be with a patina they do not show up sell in a bar. It sounds as if you are leaning to chrome. I've found that most of the shiny things I've seen are not chrome but triple nickel plated. I've also seen the reflection spoil the loads of balls small and large, behind and below in cup routines. Having the insides darkened does not look attractive.

Will your routine be done on a platform or stage above the viewers or on a table below them? This will affect their ability to see inside as you move the cups. How visible will chrome be shining under strong stage lights? Nickel is a bit more adjustable I think. As for adjusting methods by inspecting with video, there are only so many ways to hide the ball. Al Schneider's is the best technique I've ever seen, but that's nothing new. Keep us posted.

Curious if stainless steel tubing rings will take a chrome plating. The ones I have are a bit dull.


P
Message: Posted by: magiccollector69 (Nov 15, 2019 12:54PM)
Both nickel and chrome can look great, if properly done. And properly means up to several intermediate platings depending on the final material. Modern environmental laws have driven many platers our of business, particularly in cities.

I have a set of "The New Rings n' Things" monti cups in chrome that look wonderful, though I admit I've never used them (I prefer Paul Fox style cups.)

One issue with nickel plating that I've read, and at the time I read it I recall trusting the source implicitly (it may have been James Riser), is that SOME nickel plating can oxidize away over time, unless protected by something like wax. I don't know if that's true; I just tried looking it up and could find no confirmation, but web searches nowadays for anything other than shopping are next to useless. Right now I'm looking at some very large nickel plated cups I got from Stevens Magic quite a few years ago. The exteriors are dull and oxidized. The exterior surfaces inside the nested cups are as bright as the day they were made. I should have waxed them...now I'll need to polish the dull areas and hope that it's only surface oxidation.

Note also there are different types of nickel plating, some tougher than others. Nickel plating has been done to firearms for decades, and that's a very hostile environment to surface finishes.

In terms of looks, polished aluminum can be about as shiny as chrome, but will not look as nice as a good chrome job. Good chrome is deep and beautiful. Nickel will look very much like chrome, but may possibly reflect a bit of more yellow light. Chrome, generally reflects more blue light. At least to me.

As noted, good chrome shouldn't chip. I had 70's Rings n' Things linking rings and despite the banging they took no chipping.
Message: Posted by: Mad Jake (Nov 20, 2019 03:09PM)
The nickel plating is only as good as the surface that it adheres too. That is why a lot of platers shut their doors when the EPA came down on them about the Copper Cyanide Strike process. Our plater has already said if they have to stop using the Cyanide strike the will close their doors for good.
Luckily they are Grandfathered and are still allowed to use it. But the EPA is constantly doing routine checks. Our father told us one time the EPA came in and told them them had to replace a tank. The foreman stopped all production on the dime and replaced ALL the tanks they have.

Once they Nickel the cups for us, they de-blue the cups, dip them again, de-blue the cups and do it a third time. With a triple nickel base, its then polished again and plated with Chromium which really give the cups their luster. With the cups done like this the finish does not deteriorate on the cups
at all. I have numerous sets from our father that were plated 15 years ago and they look like they just came from the plater. If you use the new process you will probably see flaking.

As far as I know from our dad's notes, Rings N Things did not chrome their effects or cups, they polished them and then used some type of Epoxy on them.

Polished aluminum doesn't hold a candle to Nickel plating and the luster you see in the Nickel is the chromium in the final stage. There should be no notice or barely any of a blue hue to them. Also Nickel plating with a Chromium finish, the Nickel will not deteriorate, if done with the old Cyanide Strike method.

As to Plungerman with stainless steel rings, Stainless can not be plated. Our plater turned dad down when he wanted his rings stripped and replated, stating it was too dangerous.