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Topic: Krazy Kube - Encyclopedia Of Rope Magic
Message: Posted by: alexander_may (Dec 12, 2019 04:23AM)
I'm trying to find out info on this routine, as I'm working on a presentation for Cubio. I saw about Krazy Kube by Roy Shrimplin in Stewart James' Encyclopedia. Sadly my copy does not have this routine in :( Apparently its in the newer expanded edition, which I don't have.

Anybody have this that wouldn't mind sharing it with me?
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Dec 12, 2019 05:09PM)
Abbott's still makes this prop. It is a stand up effect for larger audiences. There is not much of a routine given. Very short, and it is said Roy Shrimplin got a lot out of it, I don't see it from what is given.
Message: Posted by: alexander_may (Dec 13, 2019 11:10AM)
Thank you for the info. I was hoping for a good explanation of his routine. For some reason there doesn't seem to be much material out there for the Cubio routine :(
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Dec 13, 2019 12:38PM)
No, there never has been, it is just the cube starting and stopping to fall on the cord. Did you look it up on Abbott's website?, you did not say.
Message: Posted by: FrankFindley (Dec 13, 2019 02:02PM)
To get most out of it requires some puppetry like interaction. This can be played from spooky to comedy. Here is a fantastic example by Jim Jayes: [youtube]y3j0kyMmTJs[/youtube]

The version he is using can be found here: [url]http://www.grandillusions.com/product/educated-block/[/url]. I don't own this particular one but reports have been very positive.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Dec 13, 2019 07:26PM)
Alexander, I checked and Abbott's currently do not list the trick. They do list the instrutions on sale for $4, but they require a minimum of 4 instruction sheets to be purchased.

It is Roy Shrimplin's routine.
Message: Posted by: alexander_may (Dec 13, 2019 11:08PM)
I just checked Abbotts website and saw the instruction sheet. What a pity they require a minimum of four to be bought, I would have bought the Roy Shrimplin one straight away.

FrankFindlay, thanks for that video! Great presentation. I agree that one would have to act as if the block is actually 'alive.'

I also think making the block climb up on the rope at the end is a really unexpected moment. I've only found two instances of this in print so far.
Message: Posted by: John Long (Dec 14, 2019 10:31PM)
Goes to show ya; a good presentation makes the trick. That was a children's presentation that seemed to play well for adults, because of the presentation.


Krazy Kube is in either vol 2 or volume 3 (but I would guess in Vol 2) of the originals by Abbot. If you have the Dover reprint, I think that is just vol 1 material.

My understanding is that The Stewart James Ency of Rope is essentially the combination of the original vol's 1, 2, & 3.

The combined version explains Krazy Kube as:

"Magician displays a three inch solid block with a rope running completely through it. A rod is passed through the block, proving conclusively that there is nothing inside the block except the free-running rope. The magician steps on one end of the rope, holding other end in his hand along with the Kube. Rod is placed against rope to prevent the Kube from falling all the way down the rope. Now the rod is removed but the Kube remains suspended. This is repeated. The Kube is given a spin on the rope and at the magician's command reverses it action"

Doesn't that just thrill you? What more could you ask for? :)

The book gives a diagram of the workings of the Kube (so you could potentially make your own if you are "handy" (you just need a drill press & a jig to hold the block in the right orientation).

The "reversing" (in the book's description) refers to the direction of the spin, not the the up/down movement. (this part isn't as impressive as it "reads".

I believe that book also has the penetration, that Jayes did, in a separate section (at least I've seen it someplace, and it looked good).


Alexander: Do you have a source for the block climbing back up the rope?

John
Message: Posted by: alexander_may (Dec 15, 2019 12:31AM)
Thank you so much for that info! I was just keen to know how that routine goes in that book. I do have the Dover edition so it's missing quite a bit from the expanded version it seems.

I've been thinking of this trick for a while and always feel like it could be more than just a clever puzzle. I just don't know exactly how yet :)

I do think though that if the block climbs back up the rope it adds a really nice layer- taking it beyond just falling thanks to gravity. Maybe I'm overthinking the whole thing, but I'm keen to try it.

The instances I've found so far is in Later Magic by professor Hoffmann, called the Obedient Ball. It's a rather complicated mechanism to construct (in tune with many effects from that era!). I've also found a routine from Wizards Journal at magicnook called Billy Blockhead, which seems a much easier construction, no slanted angles needed in the block either for the falling and stopping part.

I've also just read a way in Wolfgang Riebe's book Its A Stage I'm Going Through. That also seems like a simple task to set up.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Dec 15, 2019 10:14AM)
You might find the Obedient Orange more interesting.

https://www.vikingmagic.com/product/obedient-orange/


I outlined the original routine to you, not it did ot defy gravity. The block came with small stick, and the was used to bring the block back up the string.
Message: Posted by: FrankFindley (Dec 15, 2019 11:01AM)
[quote]On Dec 15, 2019, Bill Hegbli wrote:
You might find the Obedient Orange more interesting.

https://www.vikingmagic.com/product/obedient-orange/


I outlined the original routine to you, not it did ot defy gravity. The block came with small stick, and the was used to bring the block back up the string. [/quote]

I have been doing a lot of research into the obedient orange. One tidbit I found is that gimmick can also be used to create an obedient floating paper ball stage effect. The magician tears a sheet from the programme or other book and crumples it into a ball. The ball both rises to the hands and falls in the method. It is called [i]The Floating Ball of Paper[/i] in [b]Original creation for magicians hitherto kept "up his sleeve"[/b] by Charles Waller published in 1920. It is a very practical one person floating routine. It is typical of the type of act that would start the second half of a show in that era.
Message: Posted by: John Long (Dec 15, 2019 07:59PM)
Some very interesting resources:

Alexander: I found the Obedient Ball in "More Magic" by Hoffman. It looks like a complicated gizmo, I didn't read all of the description.

Bill: Thanks for the link to the Obedient Orange. If I read it correctly, it stops, or drops; it won't go up (let me know if I'm wrong), but it seems to work with ungimmicked pieces of fruit!

Frank: Interesting, but I'm not planning on purchasing it at this time.

Thanks to all
John
Message: Posted by: alexander_may (Dec 16, 2019 12:10AM)
I like the idea of an orange, it looks more organic and natural than a block of wood. The paper ball also sounds great, I'm going to see if I can track down a copy of that book.

At the moment it seems that the version by Magic Nook is the easiest and most practical. On paper at least, won't know till I make it up and try it!It also allows the ever important climbing up :)

It also seems that with a little bit of preparation one could use that method with an orange or other fruit as well.
Message: Posted by: FrankFindley (Dec 16, 2019 10:57PM)
[quote]On Dec 16, 2019, alexander_may wrote:
I like the idea of an orange, it looks more organic and natural than a block of wood. The paper ball also sounds great, I'm going to see if I can track down a copy of that book.[/quote]

When I get back to office in a couple days I will get the details of paperball for you.

But check this out. In the October 2013 [i]The Magic Circular[/i] Chris Wardle disclosed his "The Obedient Ball Updated". His concern was the obedient ball was losing effectiveness among youth because of all the electronic devices they will just assume it is robotic. So he developed a break apart version where there is nothing inside to see!

[img]http://libertyassociate.com/TheMagicCafe/Newobedientball.png[/img]

What inventive thinking. Reminds me of the Pom Pom stick. I am going to make a parlour size one this weekend.
Message: Posted by: alexander_may (Dec 17, 2019 12:34AM)
That is definitely some inventive thinking! One of the things I don't like about the wooden block is that it looks "magic-y" - and in the minds of the audience could easily be gimmicked.

I'm really excited to see it once you've made it up! I presume the Magic Circular is members-only, as I don't see it for sale anywhere.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Dec 20, 2019 03:29AM)
Alexander, don't get hung up on the object going up the string. I had this effect 50 years ago, and it did not travel up the string. That part is "I Believe" as it has been a long time, was a gag. The performer simply lifted the block with the stick, or turned the string end for end, and then said it was going up the string.

If you are more interested in the traveling up, then the block effect, then I suggest you look into rope magic by Ken Brooke at Stevens Magic.

"Ken's Krazy Rope" is a moving knot on a rope. The magician moves the knot down the rope at several positions while holding the knot, then the knot magically moves up the rope, and the magician can pluck the knot off, and throw into the audience.
Message: Posted by: FrankFindley (Dec 30, 2019 04:58PM)
[quote]On Dec 17, 2019, alexander_may wrote:
That is definitely some inventive thinking! One of the things I don't like about the wooden block is that it looks "magic-y" - and in the minds of the audience could easily be gimmicked.

I'm really excited to see it once you've made it up! I presume the Magic Circular is members-only, as I don't see it for sale anywhere. [/quote]

Yes, the Magic Circular is the membership magazine of The Magic Circle.

I made a prototype out of a five inch clear plastic ornament that comes apart in two pieces. The inside was painted white and black paracord was used for the cord. A clear tape hinge was added on outside to help with opening.

It looks great and the effect is very good. But it isn't reliable at this point. The paracord is wearing on the gimmick until it breaks. So, I need to experiment with other cord and gimmick materials.
Message: Posted by: alexander_may (Dec 31, 2019 12:24AM)
Might be great for Christmas time shows to use a Christmas tree decoration like that. Looking forward to seeing once you've managed to get it to work better. I experimented on fake fruit, but they are way too light to work smoothly.
Message: Posted by: jimgerrish (Jan 2, 2020 12:54PM)
It's in "Billy Blockhead" by Wiz Kid Marquise. It stops, drops, rises and, using the rest of the props with it, appears, disappears and talks (vent required).
Message: Posted by: jimgerrish (Jan 2, 2020 03:39PM)
Almost forgot! Billy Blockhead also penetrates the rope!
Message: Posted by: alexander_may (Jan 3, 2020 02:25AM)
The "Billy Blockhead" routine so far certainly seems the most straight-forward method of achieving the effect of both falling and climbing.