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Topic: History of magic
Message: Posted by: rarrarrar (Jun 14, 2004 09:12PM)
I would like to know of any sources that tell of all the great card men, biographies, what they contributed to card magic and the like.
Message: Posted by: balducci (Jun 14, 2004 10:06PM)
I'm about half way through "Phantoms of the Card Table" by Britland and Gazzo. Good book, focusing on Walter Scott's life, but it begins by talking about early card cheats from the 1800s, then talks about the cardsmen / magicians in New York in the 1920s / 1930s. Many interesting anecdotes.

For instance, given the events with Maxwell and Penguin over the past few days (people accusing them - rightly or wrongly - of cheating others and so on), it was interesting to read about some of the cheats Dai Vernon pulled on his contemporaries back in the early part of last century (e.g., passed a double lift off as the latest move, in order to acquire knowledge of a middle deal; sold his $20 manuscript to many more people than the limited run of 12 copies he initially promised, etc.).

Anyway, it's a well written and interesting book. It may or may not be exactly what you're looking for, but I'm enjoying it.
Message: Posted by: captainshirquin (Jun 14, 2004 10:09PM)
Any good online references?
Message: Posted by: T. Joseph O'Malley (Jun 14, 2004 10:12PM)
I heartily second Balducci's recommendation and not just because of our Italian id names.

In a similar vein is "The man who was Erdnase" but it's difficult to get a hold of. It contains speculations/proof of who Erdnase may have actually been. It is well written and an interesting read, with a section on sleights as well.

TJO'
Message: Posted by: rarrarrar (Jun 14, 2004 10:30PM)
[quote]
On 2004-06-14 23:06, balducci wrote:
I'm about half way through "Phantoms of the Card Table" by Britland and Gazzo. Good book, focusing on Walter Scott's life, but it begins by talking about early card cheats from the 1800s, then talks about the cardsmen / magicians in New York in the 1920s / 1930s. Many interesting anecdotes.

For instance, given the events with Maxwell and Penguin over the past few days (people accusing them - rightly or wrongly - of cheating others and so on), it was interesting to read about some of the cheats Dai Vernon pulled on his contemporaries back in the early part of last century (e.g., passed a double lift off as the latest move, in order to acquire knowledge of a middle deal; sold his $20 manuscript to many more people than the limited run of 12 copies he initially promised, etc.).

Anyway, it's a well written and interesting book. It may or may not be exactly what you're looking for, but I'm enjoying it.

[/quote]

I will look into this book. I should have been more specific with what I was looking for. I am after a book ( or any source, I just figured a book would probably be where this information is discussed in detail. ) that has information about all the major contributors to card magic, the people that made it what it is today so to speak.

I have looked around on amazon.com and other places and come up with basically nothing, stuff about magic the game and more unrelated material.
Message: Posted by: LeConte (Jun 15, 2004 12:42AM)
There has been no general history of close up card magic written to the best of my knowledge. I wish I had the talent to write this book!! It would have chapters on Vernon, LePaul, Marlo, Jennings, Dingle, Harris and on and on.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jul 14, 2004 07:54PM)
[quote]
On 2004-06-14 23:06, balducci wrote:
I'm about half way through "Phantoms of the Card Table" by Britland and Gazzo. Good book, focusing on Walter Scott's life, but it begins by talking about early card cheats from the 1800s, then talks about the cardsmen / magicians in New York in the 1920s / 1930s. Many interesting anecdotes.

For instance, given the events with Maxwell and Penguin over the past few days (people accusing them - rightly or wrongly - of cheating others and so on), it was interesting to read about some of the cheats Dai Vernon pulled on his contemporaries back in the early part of last century (e.g., passed a double lift off as the latest move, in order to acquire knowledge of a middle deal; sold his $20 manuscript to many more people than the limited run of 12 copies he initially promised, etc.).

Anyway, it's a well written and interesting book. It may or may not be exactly what you're looking for, but I'm enjoying it.

[/quote]

According to a well-read source, who owns some of the correspondence between Vernon and some other people in the book, some of the incidents in the book never happened, specifically some of the out-of-character confrontations between Scott and Vernon.
Message: Posted by: snap (Nov 20, 2004 10:11PM)
I don't know about card magic, but the first hint of magic was in hieroglyphics which shows two men playing with cups, but the absence of balls suggests it might not be magic. after that the first documented sign is written in westcar papyrus, and describes a scene were dedi, a magician of the time, was called to the courts of king cheops to entertain him. he performed an effect where he cut off an animals head and then brought it back to life unscathed. the king wanted him to repeat the effect with a slave. dedi declined, but did it again with an ox. I don't know if that answers your question, but that's what I know.