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Topic: Who can earn money only with magic ?
Message: Posted by: emeline (Sep 8, 2004 11:11AM)
I would like to know if there are some people in this forum who earns their life just with magic ? in my opinion the most of people on this forum have a job in the same time. And I think magic is a hobby very expensive ( especially with all the books I have to buy! ) so it's necessary to earn very well our life! for me, magic is a hobby and I don't want it becomes my job because I want it stays a pleasure! :rotf:
Message: Posted by: Rob Johnston (Sep 8, 2004 11:27AM)
There are many people on this board that are full-time pros. I am sure they will speak up.

And think about Magic as a Job...it would be a Job you truly enjoy and love.
Message: Posted by: Adam Keisner (Sep 8, 2004 01:07PM)
I often felt that one of the real reasons magic is shrouded in secrecy, is not because of the sleights and methods but because of how much money pro magicians can make.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 8, 2004 03:18PM)
I currently earn a full time living performing family and children's magic shows. I tend to refer away shows for adult-only groups, as well as close-up / strolling.

- Donald
Message: Posted by: Paddy (Sep 8, 2004 04:30PM)
I have been a full time pro for 5 years and part time for 2 years before that. I do restaurant (6 restaurants a week,) corporate, and parties. Best move I ever made. BTW started when I was 54 yrs old am now 60 yrs old. This is my only income as I never was at a real job long enough to build up retirement benefits.

Peter
Message: Posted by: Andy Wonder (Sep 8, 2004 05:47PM)
I am also a full time pro. Since going full time I have not found performing any less of a pleasure. In fact the opposite is true. I am able to invest a lot more time and resources into developing my act & performing has become more enjoyable. When I was a hobbyist I used to get stage fright & be nervous about performing, but now it is just fun. It is the paperwork side of things that is not always so pleasurable.
Message: Posted by: Michael Messing (Sep 8, 2004 06:59PM)
I am a full-time professional but agree that, for many, performing full time can take the enjoyment away from your love of magic. It takes a person who is really driven to do magic as a living to enjoy the hard work and ups and downs of full time performing.

I was a photographer in college and thought that it would be more logical to become a photographer than a magician (at least my dad thought so!) Anyway, I tried it for a while and found that it ruined photography for me.

If you love magic and you want to do it as living because you think it will always be fun and exciting, you'll be disappointed. On the other hand, if it's in your blood and you're willing to put up with the bad times as well as the good times, with lots of determination you can make it happen.

Personally, I think I'm very lucky. I get to make people happy for a living. What could be better than that?
Message: Posted by: flourish dude (Sep 8, 2004 07:09PM)
I too am a full timer and I have learned that this to is a job just like any other. You have to do loads of paperwork, self promoting, bookkeeping and other things just like any other business. If you lack in any of these areas your incomes suffers for it. Even though this is a business it is one I love and that makes the difference but it is a lot of work. I often work more hours at this business than when I had a 9-5 job.
Message: Posted by: Jim Snack (Sep 8, 2004 07:22PM)
I have been a full-time professional since 1979, although for the past ten years I have been combining magic with a message in motivational programs for the bulk of my business.
Message: Posted by: hugmagic (Sep 8, 2004 09:08PM)
I am also a full time pro. Mainly in the manufacturing but also some performing.

I had worked 9 to 5 jobs and do miss the security, retirement, health benefits but do not miss the chest pains and headaches it cause.

I understand what Mikey means about making something a living to ruin it for you. I was also a full time photographer.

I have always said there are not perfect jobs but there are a lot of perfect hobbies. The minute you make the hobby your job, it does become less than perfect.
Message: Posted by: floridamagic (Sep 8, 2004 11:20PM)
Im Also a full time pro. I feel real lucky that I have a wife that understands the up and down times of being a magician.
Message: Posted by: Jim Snack (Sep 9, 2004 05:46AM)
Magicmikey says "If you love magic and you want to do it as living because you think it will always be fun and exciting, you'll be disappointed." If that is your only motivating desire, I believe he is right.

To succeed at magic professionally, you also need a strong desire to be self-employed and run your own business. If you don't want to deal with those responsibilities, it is probably better to keep magic as a hobby.

Richard also makes a good point about "the minute you make the hobby your job, it does become less than perfect."

I've always believed that this can happen because we full time pros accept that sometimes we have to make decisions for a business reason rather than an artistic reason.

For example, I may want to perform a certain illusion for artistic reasons, but I realize from a business standpoint that it doesn't make sense to invest the time and money because it can only be performed under very limited performing conditions. It would make more business sense to work on something I can perform more freqently.

Finally, as Floridamagic points out, having an understanding spouse is very important. I am blessed with one also, and I could never weather the ups and downs without her unwavering support and belief in my ability.
Message: Posted by: drhackenbush (Sep 9, 2004 12:17PM)
Been a full-time professional entertainer for 3 years, part time for about 10, and before that amateur since first grade. Spend a lot of time on the business side of things, but my workday is usually over by noon, and it is much better than any of the 9-5 jobs I had. One of my first steps was to get health insurance, wasn't gonna play with that one. It takes a lot of work, but if you don't mind putting in a lot towards getting the life you want, it's a feasible choice.
Message: Posted by: NJJ (Sep 9, 2004 05:31PM)
I'm full time but also earn extra dollars organising other performers for gigs.

Once you understand the marketing you can help other performers get work and make extra money.
Message: Posted by: The Village Idiots (Sep 9, 2004 07:05PM)
Performing is all I know how to do. I was fortunate enough to be raised by a stage mom. I grew up seeing artists do what they loved for a living.

There are amazing ups and downs in this business and to find a woman that will put up with it is a challenge in itself.

You also have no co-workers so a social life is tricky.

Money is hard to keep consistant. Sometimes checks take forever but they are in the mail.

It is a challenge and not for the meek. I don't point out the positives, not becuase I am that negative but if you are going to do it you'll go through with it anyway.

Oh, and I failed to mention burn out from living it 24/7.

Still, the worst day on stage has to be better than the best day in an office. I don't know but it is a guess.
Message: Posted by: tctahoe (Sep 9, 2004 09:51PM)
I am a full time pro..in fact as my wife puts it, “he’s never had a real job.”
I have been a full time magician since 1983…oh, my god how old am I ?!

Still love it and can’t image what it would be like to have to go to an office every day…
Message: Posted by: Nachtzehrer (Sep 9, 2004 10:30PM)
I've been living out of magic since I was 20. I'm 26 now. i'vee been doing stage magic, mainly dove magic, close up now and then (not a lot of market for that here in Portugal), Hipnotism and mentalism.
Alex
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Sep 10, 2004 12:45AM)
If the Village Idiots are Burned Out it's not from magic....It's Cruise Ship Cabin Fever!..... Although their current flight schedule seems pretty sweet. All in all... It's got to be better than an office gig.
Message: Posted by: London (Sep 10, 2004 05:49AM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-08 12:11, emeline wrote:
And I think magic is a hobby very expensive ( especially with all the books I have to buy! )
[/quote]
Why do you "HAVE TO" buy all those books. Just buy the right books and you will have a lifetime worth of magic in just a few volumes. Don't get me wrong. I myself have hundreds of books on magic. I collect. However noone ever said I HAD TO buy them.
Anyhow that just struck me as a funny comment. Good luck
Message: Posted by: wizardofsorts (Sep 10, 2004 04:56PM)
I'm a full time pro and have been for the last 3 years. I was a part time pro for 4 years before that. I had a slow month in April, got scared, and picked up a temp job. I HATED it! I lasted 9 days before I had to call the agency and tell them that I couldn't do it. Plus I had picked up the gigs I needed. I hope, pray, and beg, to never have to go back to an office again.
Edd
Message: Posted by: Tony S (Sep 11, 2004 12:27PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-10 17:56, wizardofsorts wrote:
I'm a full time pro and have been for the last 3 years. I was a part time pro for 4 years before that. I had a slow month in April, got scared, and picked up a temp job. I HATED it! I lasted 9 days before I had to call the agency and tell them that I couldn't do it. Plus I had picked up the gigs I needed. I hope, pray, and beg, to never have to go back to an office again.
Edd
[/quote]

Edd - I'm curious - did you work in an office prior to going pro full time? Or when you pray to not go back to an office again is it due to the 9 days as a temp? I ask because I work in an office now and I just have to get out! I am currently working on going pro full time. My office job pays well, but the stress is killing me. I know there will be other stress in doing magic, but at least the stress will be my own and I will be doing something I love to do.

Tony
Message: Posted by: wizardofsorts (Sep 11, 2004 02:27PM)
I never worked in an office before that temp job. I never want to go back. ::sobbing softly::
Edd
Message: Posted by: Paddy (Sep 11, 2004 03:25PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-11 13:27, Tony S wrote:

Edd - I'm curious - did you work in an office prior to going pro full time? Or when you pray to not go back to an office again is it due to the 9 days as a temp? I ask because I work in an office now and I just have to get out! I am currently working on going pro full time. My office job pays well, but the stress is killing me. I know there will be other stress in doing magic, but at least the stress will be my own and I will be doing something I love to do.

Tony
[/quote]

Tony, I have told my story before so I won't repeat it (you can email me or pm me and I will tell you the gory drtails) but I walked out on the corporate world, health insurance, benefits and all at age 54. (I am now 60 yrs old.) Told them all to kiss my (Democratic Party symbol) and started doing restaurant walk around magic. Got seen by enough people and asked about b'day parties, which I did. Got seen by a few more people and asked to do some corporate events. Which I do.

Then learned to market myself by taking Jim Snack's "Success In Magic" course and am makeing a heck of a lot mre money than I ever did in the corporate world.

Serious advice is get Jim's course ( http://www.success-in-magic.com ) and go for it. It is the best move I ever made in my life.

Peter
Message: Posted by: Tony S (Sep 11, 2004 04:34PM)
Peter,
Thanks for your story. It's inspiring for me. I'm doing quite a bit of work in my spare time right now to be ready to make the jump. Once I'm ready it's going to be goodbye to corporate America!

I do plan on purchasing Jim's course. I've heard nothing but good things about it here. Jim seems like a great guy too! I'll most likely purchase it next month on the next credit card cycle.

Thanks, again. I'm going to PM you for the rest of your story.


Tony
Message: Posted by: mormonyoyoman (Sep 11, 2004 04:59PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-11 17:34, Tony S wrote:
Peter,
Thanks for your story. It's inspiring for me. I'm doing quite a bit of work in my spare time right now to be ready to make the jump. Once I'm ready it's going to be goodbye to corporate America!

I do plan on purchasing Jim's course. I've heard nothing but good things about it here. Jim seems like a great guy too! I'll most likely purchase it next month on the next credit card cycle.

Thanks, again. I'm going to PM you for the rest of your story.


Tony
[/quote]

Paddy Peter told his story in wonderful detail here: http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=80397&forum=44&25

And you're absolutely right: he IS inspiring!
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Sep 11, 2004 08:22PM)
I was a full-time pro for 26 years. I retired from most of my performing, and am now in the publishing business. I stil perform from time to time, but not as my sole source of income. I enjoyed most of the work I did as a magician.
Message: Posted by: NJJ (Sep 11, 2004 09:18PM)
Are there any full timers who DON'T rely on kid's parties for a large part of their income?
Message: Posted by: Jim Snack (Sep 11, 2004 11:02PM)
I used to rely on children's shows for most of my business. Not birthday parties, but schools, scouts, church groups, fairs and festivals.

Now it is mostly corporate and association work for adults. I still do schools and family festivals when they call, but I don't actively seek them.
Message: Posted by: tctahoe (Sep 12, 2004 04:37AM)
I don't do Children' parties...and greatly admire those who are good at it.
I thought it was only the laymen who assumed all magicians do kid shows...
Message: Posted by: floridamagic (Sep 12, 2004 11:51AM)
I mostly perform for theme parks like Disney World ,Wonder Works and Weeki Watchee. But I will do a kids show for the right price.
Message: Posted by: MentaThought (Sep 12, 2004 12:34PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-08 20:09, flourish dude wrote:

I too am a full timer and I have learned that this to is a job just like any other. You have to do loads of paperwork, self promoting, bookkeeping and other things just like any other business. [/quote]

I'd be curious to know how many of the pros here take care of the above needs (paperwork, promotion, bookkeeping etc.) themselves vs. hiring other pros who specialize in these thinsg to do them.
I (who would like to work professionally part-time in mentalism), for example, am the kind of person who likes to have "experts" take care of things I know I'm not good/experienced/knowledgable at, such as handyman jobs around the house, and would prefer to have other pros do it for me.
Comments?
Message: Posted by: Paddy (Sep 12, 2004 04:53PM)
I bought Quickbook Pro for my accounting software, it is not cheap but invaluable to me. I do everything myself, booking, advertiseing, promotion, the whole works. Jim Snack's Success In Magic ( http://www.success-in-magic.com ) was also invauable for teaching me about promotion and sales of my entertainment package.
Peter
Message: Posted by: NJJ (Sep 12, 2004 05:24PM)
I use the 1992 version of microsoft money!

There is no need to over complicate things if you don't need too!

I do my own books but my account does my taxes.

:)
Message: Posted by: flourish dude (Sep 13, 2004 05:21AM)
Sure you'll need to hire an accountant but you still have to keep the day to day books. By that I mean keep track of what you spent and where. As far as paying someone to promote you, no one can do that better than you. I know a few people how have hired someone to get the phone and book shows for them but this only comes after you are booking a lot of shows and can justify the expense. Jim Snack's book is great for showing a good path to follow. I myself only work around 35 shows a month and it does not make sense to hire someone to awnser the phone for me. There is a great saying out there "Are you using your time to save money or make money?" Sometimes I need to follow that a bit more.When you are working for yourself in show business the business side is the bigger side and a lot of work. I don't know anyone who just pays to have it done for them and they just sit back and do shows. This is a big mis-understanding when people think they would like to be a full timer. They think they can just do shows, this is not true there is a lot of work to be done and the shows are a very small part of running an entertainment business for yourself.

The best thing I learned was to set in place systems. I have a system for everything, this helps keep things simple. I use MagicBase for my client information. It is cheaper and I think easier then ACT (I have that too)I can print everything with one click, the contract, the thank you letter, the envelope and the poster for the show. It fills in all the details for that show for me. As far as the bookkeeping I use QuickBooks this makes it easy for my accountant to do the taxes. I have a system for booking shows and have made a marketing calendar so I know when I need to promote. The hard part is putting it together but when it is together it should make your job a lot easier. There is a lot of good information out there about the business side of magic. The hard part is doing it.
Message: Posted by: Somecreative Stagename (Sep 14, 2004 03:34PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-13 06:21, flourish dude wrote:
I myself only work around [b]35 shows a month[/b]...[/quote] :fear:

Wow! Is that really true or a typo? 35 shows a month? Of course that would mean you're making some fairly big money, but no life outside of this... not even practice time...

Hoping you get some rest,
Paul
Message: Posted by: MarkTripp (Sep 14, 2004 07:12PM)
I have been a full time pro for over 40 years.

I have done every kind of show at any kind of venue you can name.

I do all my bookwork and tax stuff myself.

An average month of shows is about 80.

In my younger days I did even more than that.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 14, 2004 09:35PM)
Wow, Mark!

Now that's a lot of magic shows!

Are those mostly trade show performances, or preschool shows? Those are the only two types of performers I have heard doing that many full performances in a month.

- Donald

P.S. I'm assuming that when doing table hopping for restaurants, that performers aren't counting every table visit as a performance. Same for strolling. Not that I am implying this is what Mark is saying. :)
Message: Posted by: Jim Snack (Sep 14, 2004 09:35PM)
I book about 150 dates per year, averaging 12-15 dates per month. It's been that way for many years.

Sometimes I will book multiple shows on a date - school assemblies, for example - but not as much as in my early years.

My goal is the same one expressed by Tom Mullica several years ago in a Magic magazine interview: "More money, fewer shows, more free time."
Message: Posted by: TheDean (Sep 15, 2004 11:15AM)
Yep! Jim is right on the money with that one! (As always!)

A few years ago I too was a maniac when it came to booking gigs. To date, I have performed well over 25,000 shows. Lots of those in "multiple show" venues. Earlier it was theme parks, (One year alone over 3,000 shows!) and later it was and is Casinos... (3 to 6 shows a day at Harrah’s then across the street for 2 more review shows each night, 7 days a week!) so it was EASY to get past those numbers.

Yeah, I know… I was NUTS!

Anyway, my aim (successfully or not – Hehehehe!) is to keep my show, speaking and consulting commitments down to around 4 “well paying” gigs a month. It's not easy, because of my 'maniac' past, and the fact that I have developed quite a relational base and business and the demand is well greater than that to say the least!

Less shows, more money, better able to REALLY serve and support the re-elationships I work with.

Anton Zeller has it right: He has 3 clients that support him, ad thet he supports for literally millions of dollars in income annually.

Woo Hoo!

Just one more “Chime-In” on the subject.

I am at your service and In His Service,
Deano
<><
Message: Posted by: MarkTripp (Sep 15, 2004 02:08PM)
Well, depends on which part of my carrer.

I have done school assemblies for over 20 years. Two schools a day, 4 shows a day, five days a week.

When I did theme parks I did 6 to 8 shows a day. When I was realy pushing bvirthday parties I did at least 7 or 8 a week; along with day care.

Comedy clubs were one a night with doubles on weekends.

Of course there were college tours and malls over the years as well.

Right now I am just doing schools and summer camps with birthday parties when I am home.
Message: Posted by: Jim Snack (Sep 15, 2004 03:04PM)
Mark is right... the number of shows depends on where you are in your career.

Early in my career, I would take any and all bookings I could squeeze into my schedule. My strategy for accepting a booking was simple - if I could physically get to the venue, I would take the booking.

It didn't matter if that meant missing meals, sleep or other things. I just want as many shows as possible in order to get experience before as many audiences as possible. And that's a good thing. I wouldn't trade that experience for anything. It allowed me to polish my current routines, build my business, and move up the career ladder.

Now, I can sit back and be a little more selective about which ones to take. I don't need, or want, 30 shows a month, although I still occassionally take a few that I should probably pass on. I actually took a library show this summer for very little money. I hope my corporate clients don't hear about it!

But then again, it wasn't about the money, it was about repaying a favor to someone who gave me lots of work many years ago, and I had a blast doing the show. At some point it shouldn't matter if you do 4 or 40 shows a month, as long as you are still enjoying doing them and are making enough money to run your business.
Message: Posted by: TheDean (Sep 15, 2004 03:39PM)
[b]AMEN Brother Jim![/b]
Message: Posted by: MarkTripp (Sep 16, 2004 08:37AM)
Well, the way around the "price" is to use the Karrell Fox method of different "characters".

Karrell Fox got a lot more money than "Wow the Wizard".

Milky the Clown got more than both of them put together!

About the "number" of shows:

Introduction

It has been a great many years since I have put pen to paper (or more correctly, fingers to keyboard), to speak on the performance of Magic. I choose that term “performance” very carefully, as that is the only magic I know how to write about. There are other fields of magic to be sure. From the historical to the technical to the construction to the marketing, and much more. However, it is the performance of magic that has always interested me.

I never wanted to be anything but a performer, and my chosen performance field was magic. Yes, I have acted, done stand up comedy (with and with out my magic), musical and dramatic theater, and even belted out my share of show tunes and ballads in my day. Still, my drive and ambitions have always been to be a magical performer.

Now, I also made a direct decision not to make “magicians” my audience of choice. I was not interested in “fooling the boys” at the magic meetings, nor did I care to work any of the conventions. My chosen venue was what we in the field call “laymen”, although today the term “muggles” might be more correct, if not up to date!

I say, with all humility, that I have done more live shows in one year than most magicians will ever do in a lifetime. Lest you think that a casual boast, lets look at one year, 1988. In 1988 I was working for Paul Osborne as an Illusionist, Mobile Education as a School Assembly performer, and various Comedy Club agents as middle to headliner act in the mid-west. The Osborne show was at Dogpatch USA and was six shows a day, seven days a week, for 112 days (no days off). The School Shows ran the full school year and were at least 2 shows a day, five days a week, but 4 shows a day, (2 at each school) were not uncommon. I booked comedy clubs around my school tour and did 6 comedy club shows a week (4 on the weekends plus 2 during the week).

Now, I leave it to the math majors to work out, but from the above you should get three very important facts; One, over a 40 year career, I have done a LOT of shows. Two, I have done them over a WIDE range of places, people, age groups, and conditions. Three, I did them very well to keep that schedule up as long as I did. Age and health have slowed me down, or I’d still be keeping that pace.

How did I do it, and what did I do? Well, that’s what this book is all about! So come, let’s take a walk down the yellow brick road, and I shall tell you a tale…
Message: Posted by: Jim Snack (Sep 16, 2004 03:53PM)
Mark,

I'm sure you and I could share many stories...
Message: Posted by: Decomposed (Sep 16, 2004 04:15PM)
Mark,

I did a little math with just the school shows you did.

Now from my humble beginning in the school assembly programs in my city at a mere $450 for two shows back to back at the same school.

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm, who says magic doesn't pay:)

Candini
Message: Posted by: MarkTripp (Sep 16, 2004 04:39PM)
Well....

current price is $495 for one and 50% off for the second one.

Yes Jim, I am sure we could.

My goal, as there are many teaching marketing, is to teach people how to REALLY have a kick butt show, rather than just thinking they do.

There is great resistance to this, but it is where my interest lies....
Message: Posted by: Paddy (Sep 16, 2004 05:57PM)
[quote]
On 2004-09-16 17:39, MarkTripp wrote:
Well....My goal, as there are many teaching marketing, is to teach people how to REALLY have a kick butt show, rather than just thinking they do.

There is great resistance to this, but it is where my interest lies....
[/quote]

My feeling is if I'm so smart, why aren't I RICH! I'm not rich so I have to keep learning. So, no resistance here. Start teaching or getting the book out and you have a willing student HERE!!

Peter
Message: Posted by: paulajayne (Sep 16, 2004 06:17PM)
Hi
I am full time since 1994 - close-up cabaret and illusion design.


Paula
Message: Posted by: MarkTripp (Sep 16, 2004 07:04PM)
Well... its really not ready yet, but

http://www.marktripp.com

Go see what the teachers say, and then we can talk about why.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Sep 16, 2004 10:23PM)
Nice site, Mark. It's coming along nicely.

I know you didn't ask for feedback, but don't forget to add the trademark symbol after the "Safe and Smiling" show name (I assume this is the same licensed show title that I've seen in some of the Sammy Smith's "Promoting Your Act With... " books).

- Donald
Message: Posted by: MarkTripp (Sep 17, 2004 05:13AM)
Actually it is there because I am trying to learn how to format the page a different way. It is not a show I am doing, nor would I has there are about a zillion "magicians" trying to do that kind of thing in schools now.

Being a "Mac" guy I have a slow learning curve so I haven't "published the site". I am using an "idiot proof" web program (I qualify) yet it is still a slow process.

Thank you however for the input!
Message: Posted by: TheDean (Sep 17, 2004 09:54AM)
I AGREE with Mark 100%!

The fact of the matter is, no matter how good your marketing is, if your act sucks, your career will be short-lived!

"Good news travels FAST. Bad news travels even FASTER!"

As "professional performers and supports of the successes of others" we say in all our success support information that “You MUST have a great act or your marketing will eventually implode on itself”.

HAVE a GREAT ACT, then be successful at booking it!

As Stephen Covey would say: "First Things First!"

I am at your service and In His Service,
Deano
<><
Message: Posted by: MarkTripp (Sep 17, 2004 12:33PM)
Gentlemen;

It goes WAY beyond the obvious.

I would guess it was about 1970, I was watching the Mike Douglas show, and Milton Berle was on. I will NEVER forget this line:

"The problem is there are no places for the kids to go and be bad anymore. You have to be bad before you learn how to be good. In the old days there were thousands of dives all over the country where you learned your craft. Today, if you bomb, you are finished."

What do you think its like 30 years later?

Add to this the reality that MOST magic acts REALLY stink. I can't name the name here, but I was talking about this with a major magicial writer/speaker/performer and he told me of a convention that had an "open mic night" for the people there, and he was stunned at how bad the people were.

This is why the final goal of my carrer as I slide down the "twilight side of the hill" (bonus points if you know what that is from); or my 4th quarter as it were, is to give back to magic what Karrell Fox gave me at his Kitchen Table, the tools to be OUTSTANDING.

You know I have offered my lecture FOR FREE, to two magic shops in the New England area, and they are simply NOT interested.

So, we will have to see....
Message: Posted by: MagicalPirate (Sep 17, 2004 05:06PM)
Morning Side Of The Mountain by Donnie and Marie 1975

Martin :pirate:
Message: Posted by: MarkTripp (Sep 18, 2004 04:33AM)
WAY older than that, but I supose they did a version...

ding ding... you win!
Message: Posted by: magic4u02 (Sep 18, 2004 08:16AM)
Dean and Mark are so right. Most of my tips and suggestions are based upon the notion and idea that you have an established show that is good, proven and entertaining. If you do NOT have these qualities in your show, or are not sure, then you first must spend the time learning, studying and getting the show to that level.

The best marketing in the world will not work if the product your giving to them stinks. It may work for a little bit, but eventually it will collaspe on itself.

Kyle
Message: Posted by: Tim Hannig (Sep 18, 2004 11:09PM)
I've been a full time entertainer for 10 years.

About 1 1/2 years ago, I hired a secretary who works out of her home. She does, on average, about 25 hours a week for me.

I love not having to answer the calls or doing the paperwork anymore!
Message: Posted by: MarkTripp (Sep 19, 2004 03:47AM)
Just remember to keep an eye on things....

...that little boo-boo cost me about $17,000.00 years ago.