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Topic: Cups and Ball? Are there better cups than mine?
Message: Posted by: JeffHall (Aug 29, 2002 05:30PM)
I am a real beginner in cups and balls...I have aluminum cups which cost less than $20.00. Are cups cost many times more than mine really easier to work with? I am doing fine with mine and would $60.00+ make my moves that much easier?
thanks, Jeff
Message: Posted by: TOBIAS (Aug 29, 2002 06:00PM)
I have aluminum cups which I got for free. I use mine all the time and kill with them. I do a version of Mark Wilson's straight from his book. It is the easest and most basic thing I do. Now think of the patter you would have to have to clean up that version. I love doing it because of all the time I've put into it, with all the puns,jokes,mistakes. It looks like I start off with no idea how to do this kinda trick, and when I'm done thier ears are smoking.
The patter is what make this tricks not the cups, or how much they cost. When you get it down then just start kicking them in the head...
:dance:
Message: Posted by: KingStardog (Aug 30, 2002 10:50AM)
Jeff,
Cost doesn't seem to matter much. It's the feel, shape, and weight that counts. My buddy Tom uses some heavy pewter cups he got in an antique shop.

Tobias,

I just started doing the wilson one as well.
The other one was very long, and the specs lost a little interest in the middle. I picked wilsons and cut, I think the third phase, where two show under one cup on each side. This is where it starts dragging and wearing thin. By shortening it the timing comes out perfect, and the moves hit em like a machine gun. One thing that I do that goes over big and gets em laughing is at the point that the balls are in front and cups are empty I make a pass through from right to left, I pick up each cup and spin it mid air about shoulder height and put it back down. as the center cup comes back down and second before it touches the table I say in a loud voice "Tom Cruise....Cocktail" By the time I say this the third cup is in the air spinning and most everybody starts laughing.

Feel free to use it. It can be very funny if timed right.
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Message: Posted by: JeffHall (Aug 30, 2002 10:55AM)
Thanks for the information regarding the Cups and Balls...I am also working on the routine from Mark Wilson's book..His book is really amazing. Such good illustrations. I have one more question...What kind and size of balls do you use?
Thanks again for the information..regards, Jeff

On 2002-08-29 19:00, TOBIAS wrote:
I have aluminum cups which I got for free. I use mine all the time and kill with them. I do a version of Mark Wilson's straight from his book. It is the easest and most basic thing I do. Now think of the patter you would have to have to clean up that version. I love doing it because of all the time I've put into it, with all the puns,jokes,mistakes. It looks like I start off with no idea how to do this kinda trick, and when I'm done thier ears are smoking.
The patter is what make this tricks not the cups, or how much they cost. When you get it down then just start kicking them in the head...
:dance:
[/quote]
Message: Posted by: KingStardog (Aug 30, 2002 12:45PM)
One thing to consider, the smaller the cup, the easier to palm and handle and conceal the loads. This will take a lot of the pressure off. I use small pom poms for the balls and Walnuts for finals. I also use pumpkin shaped super balls at times.
Message: Posted by: Ron Giesecke (Aug 31, 2002 10:59AM)
It's funny how a lot of us start out with light, aluminum cups, and then start carping for heavier ones (I am at the front of that line).

Take a look at either David Regal's "Constant Fooling" Vol.1, or, I think it's volume three of his video series, and you'll see that he performs his very unique cups and balls using the $20.00 Morrissey cups--and he kills with them.

Granted, I personally use heavier cups with a lower center of gravity, but perhaps that testifies more to my outlandish performance as opposed to a problem with the cups themselves.

My routine borrows from many others, a sort of boiled-down isotope of Vernon, Wilson, Ammar, Gertner, and a few independently-arrived-at things as well. The cups and balls are so old, that I doubt I've originated anything. But I do have an original feel to mine, and that's what matters.

The Mark Wilson routine is indeed a good one. And I like the "I'm not sure what I'm doing" premise, and this trick is arguably one of the best scenarios for that angle--in my opinion.

As Tommy Wonder says, "I cannot wait to see you perform it!"

--Ron :hotcoffee:
Message: Posted by: mike4dice (Aug 31, 2002 12:02PM)
I too use aluminium cups that I've had for years and years. Little dented etc, but they still are cups. The best things about heavier cups are the weight (duh!) and the sound. They just plain sound better. The bad thing is the cost!

mike :nerdy:
Message: Posted by: cfrye (Aug 31, 2002 04:59PM)
Cups are like pool cues...you don't have to have the most expensive model, you need to have a consistent set. If they bend or change handling characteristics over time, you may need to replace them.
Message: Posted by: thatcheria (Sep 17, 2002 03:36PM)
The Cups and Balls is the only prop I use other than a deck of cards. I use the Owen Cups, a Thomas Wayne wand, the Cellini monkey fist balls, and a small Tabriz carpet as a close up pad. An expensive solution, but it all looks great. People are impressed before the routine even starts.

One thing I've never seen mentioned about the Owen cups is that it's very difficult to do the Colombini moves with the Owen design. Aldo's routine is very nice, so you should definitely consider this if you want to do Aldo's routine.

I use the Vernon routine, so it doesn't matter to me. I also feel that no one ever remembers anything about the routine but the final loads, so just choose a routine that feels good in your hands. Vernon's sequencing of the final loads can't be beat.

It's been said here before, but must reiterate that Thomas Wayne makes the absolute best magic wand you'll ever use, and he'll make you anything you can dream up.
Message: Posted by: Ronnie Ramin (Sep 19, 2002 02:33PM)
I have a very cheap set of brass cups I bought in high school (20 years ago) and I still use them today. They are beat up big time, I dented them myself so that they would have flat sides on them. that way when I lay them on there side they won't roll around. My routine started as the Tommy Wonder routine and slowly evolved into what it is presently. :cups:
Message: Posted by: CardConjurer (Sep 21, 2002 10:46AM)
I just use 1 inch sponge balls.. I got my set of cups for free from a guyt at my ibm ring.. One of them is a chop cup... but when he gave them to me he didnt give me any balls.. so i dont even use the chop cup feature
Message: Posted by: Browndini (Sep 21, 2002 05:05PM)
I have never ever used cups and balls before. I am interested in the cups and balls but where should i start? I usually use cards and i like movability. What are some places to start?..
Message: Posted by: mambra (Sep 23, 2002 11:06AM)
Hi.

I think cost is important in order to have "nice" props to use in front of people. Yes, I have heard about weight, but I am not sure it really counts...if you have your training with a set, it does not matter which set is.

That is my opinion, for what it worts.

Instead, BALLS are VERY important. There have been a thread in this forum about balls. Anyhow, in my opinion, there are not "the best" but it depends on the routine, on what you do. For instance, I found basball-like balls good (and expensive) but with them I find difficult to perform the elevation move. And so on.

Cheers

Stefano




Stefano Mambretti
Message: Posted by: AllThumbs (Sep 24, 2002 08:03PM)
It depends on how you want to present the cups and balls. Don't skimp on the balls though. There is always a danger with magical looking props that the spectators will think they are gaffed, but I think it probably more of an advantage with the cups and balls as its desirable for the spectators to keep their eyes on the shiny cups rather than your hands. That said a nice looking set of cups is great. I personally prefer heavier cups as I think it makes handling easier. I doubt though I'd ever get my credit card out for these "collector" cups and balls sets you see sometimes e.g. Johnson Products cups. Nice cups, sure. $200 - you've got to be kidding. :rotf:
Message: Posted by: Ron Giesecke (Sep 29, 2002 09:58AM)
The Johnson cups are routinely offered for $150.00 as a "buy it now" option on Ebay--in case anybody wants to know.
Message: Posted by: JamesinLA (Oct 14, 2002 05:08AM)
Does anyone know if there is a small wine glass that I could use as a suprize final production under a single cup? Thanks. I have been lusting after doing this for a while.
Jim in Los Angeles
Message: Posted by: Geoff Weber (Oct 14, 2002 08:20AM)
[quote]
On 2002-08-29 18:30, JeffHall wrote:
I am a real beginner in cups and balls...I have aluminum cups which cost less than $20.00. Are cups cost many times more than mine really easier to work with? I am doing fine with mine and would $60.00+ [/quote]

There are certian moves that can't be done with the alluminum cups, such as rolling the cup end over end... this is a nessicary move to accomplish sleights in certain routines.. if your routine doesn't use this move, then your only other considerations need to be how well your cups nest, and if they are big enough for your final loads, and if they look presentable.