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magicdano
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Could any one direct me to the book or DVD that has Aldo 10 card Poker Deal? And, what is the name of his effect?
Thanks
Lawrence O
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Here is about the effect. Never complete as usual, but not far from it as usual. Aldo's work is in there and even if he sells his effect with jumbo cards on his site, you can very easily perform it with regular poker size cards.

Aronson, Simon: A Stack to Remember 1979 manuscript: Ten Card Poker Deal; the cards at the 29th to 38th of his stack allow to perform the Ten Card Poker Deal effect. & Bound To Please 1994; p. 122 Ten Card Poker Deal allows to hand the deck over to the spectator for dealing the cards himself but still being sure to win.

Ackerman, Alan: Ten Card Poker Deal: first phase is the classic with shuffling half way through, the second phase is dealt face up; the third phase is done with the flop face down but only one card is dealt face down and all the others are dealt face up.

Allerton, Bert: The Phoenix # 170 February 11th 1949 page 681 Ten Card Deal P.S. Bert Allerton suggests that once the two first cards have been dealt to announce that the game will be Stud Poker and to show the spectator the eight remaining cards leaving him a free choice of four of them. He also suggests to use the Biddle move to count the ten cards from the deck before giving them to the spectator for shuffling.

Anonymous : The Phoenix #168 January 14th 1949; p 672: Ten Card Deal

Bannon, John Dear Mr. Fantasy The Power of Poker: unlike some routines, this one only works once; you can't do multiple hands and win every time

Becker, Larry: Apocalypse, Vol. 11, # 11 November 1988 ; p. 1566 : Ten Card Poker Stand-up Presentation, offers a stage adaptation for the 10 Card Poker Deal using Jumbo Cards and a board with one side showing the rules and the other side a final prediction &Stunner's Plus 1992 p 115: Hypnotic is a parlor or stage really nice 10 card poker routine

Bernstein, Bruce: Bruce Berstein's "Lecture Compendium". Psych Out. This routine has been acclaimed by many top performers Max Maven, Rick Johnsson, Charles Cameron, Eugene Burger… (some of them having their own version of the routine) as the best one of the time both in method and presentation & Psych-Out (Marketed effect) 1985

Binarelli, Tony: My Way to Mentalism; Camirand Academy: 10 Card Poker Deal & Class Act - The Magic of Tony Binarelli by Gary Ouellet; The Cincinnati Kid Poker Deal & The Linking Ring # 3 March 2005 p. 111: Can’t Win for Losing

Buckley, Arthur H. Card Control second 1947 edition (the effect was not in the original 1946 edition) p. 103 The Ten Card Poker Deal.

Chelman, Christian. Lolapalooza Poker 1999. Underground booklet offered to the subscribers of his book “Légendes urbaines” & Christian Chelman Séminaire DVD. Éd. Joker Deluxe A congame with cards where the sucker always thinks that he is going to win but always loses and insists in losing to his last cent. The routine is designed to entrap the ones who know the Jonah card principle. & Compendium Sortilegionis p. 230 Variation sur la Donne de 10 Cartes 2003. This variant results from a David Solomon’s idea but is different from his : no Jonah car dis used but a little smart and automatic con.

Clive, Paul: Card Tricks without Skill 1946: Tops Four Aces offers a principle which will be used and combined with another one by Lewis Ganson for his own routine

Colombini, Aldo: Tested Ten-Card Poker Deal 2006. For close-up or parlor. A variant on the most entertaining poker deal demonstration ever, using only ten cards. The routine using jumbo cards covers five phases (with an incredible final phase by Max Maven in which you predict the winning hands). Complete with the jumbo cards.

Curry, Paul. Paul Curry Presents. 1974 p. 28 Cider & Very Best Of Paul Curry 1986 French translation by Richard Vollmer Éd. Magix Unlimited p. 47 Le Pari & Paul Curry’s Worlds Beyond 2001 by Stephen Minch. p 59: Paul Curry uses two Jonah cards. Set : three 2, three 9 and three 10 with two indifferent cards placed in ninth and tenth position from the top of the deck.

Duffie, Peter: Deck Direct 1998 Free Will From a packet of eight cards, a spectator freely selects any four. These turn out to be random ones. The four he left you with are the four aces & Onyx [Ken Simmons' magazine]. In “Free Will” the magician and the spectator received only four cards each. It too used an extra card plus several spelling sequences. Peter cites his inspiration as Alex Elmsley’s “It’s a Small World”, which was first published in “The New Pentagram” in 1974. Then reprinted in “The Complete Works of Alex Elmsley”, Vol.2 (Minch, 1994). This used a very bold ‘behind the back’ ruse where the spectator chose five cards from a packet of ten face down cards. His turned out to be all red cards, leaving you with five black cards. Elmsley said that the plot related to Dr. Daley’s “Rouge et Noir” (Phoenix: No. 287, August 14th 1953, pages 1146 to 1149), and Hans Trixer’s “Noir et Rouge” (Abracadabra: Vol. 17, No. 419, February 6th 1954, pages 35 to 37), which were two of the earliest packet versions of Paul Curry’s “Out of This World” & Card School 1995 Backfire Poker: This is a variation of Jim Steinmeyer's 'The Ten Boys Poker Deal' which appeared in the December issue of Magic. There is some added entertainment value, and a twist at the end.

Earick, Ernest. By Forces Unseen : The Innovative Card Magic of Ernest Earick 1993 by Stephen Minch, p. 141 Double ***ed uses the idea behind Paul Curry’s Cider but involving a larger number of cards.

Ellis, Tim: The Tim Card Poker Deal. A poker-style effect where the magician plays three hands of poker against a spectator and always loses the first two hands but wins the last. The spectator seemingly makes the choices. The effect is based on the “Jonah” concept however ends up with a certain card and wins or loses. The trick comes with ten red Bicycle cards, one of which is gimmicked for the effect.

Farmer, Bob: Magic [the magazine] 1994 issues 1, 2 and 5: Flim-Flam reviews many variants of the 10 Card Poker Deal.

Frame, Tom: Scary Hotels lecture notes: Well Appointed Stud & The Trap Door November 1996 issue: Well Appointed Stud & April 2001 issue of The Linking Ring third One-Man Parade: Well Appointed Stud

Fulves, Karl. Self-working Card Tricks 1976 p. 26 Automatic Poker allows to make a prediction and to get a winning hand whatever cards the spectator chooses.

Gardner, Martin: Let’s See the Deck 1942 This is the first time the effect gets in print more as a puzzle than a trick. Gardner-Marlo Poker Routine with Ed Marlo’s idea to mark the Jonah card for shuffling freedom in the presentation & The Phoenix # 170 February 11th 1949; p 186 Ten Card Deal P.S. Martin Gardner suggests, instead of dealing, to leave a choice of five cards to the spectator in offering the ten cards fanned & Martin Gardner Presents 1993 p 186 same suggestion as in The Phoenix # 170 February 11th 1949 page 681 Ten Card Deal P.S.

Glover, Brian: Royal Flush Guaranteed. The routine is a variant of Stephen Tucker routine guaranteeing a Royal Flush. The stack is very slightly different and the end result is the same but there is no need for a slip cut half way through.

Goldstein, Phil. Apocalypse, Vol. 7, # 2, February 1984, p. 886 Pretense is a prediction variant. A spectator shuffles 10 cards and lines them up horizontally on to the table. The mentalist takes out a prediction from an envelope stating « I shall take the cards in position 1, 2, 5, 7 and 8th position and this will give me the winning hand. » which naturally happens.

Griffith Tony. Griff on Cards 1964 p. 21 A Demonstration on How to Win at Poker combines the Lewis Ganson principle with the Jonah card.

Ganson Lewis. The Gen, vol. 5, no 7 November 1949, p. 203: Gambler’s Luck. Lewis Ganson indicates that his effect combines two principles published by Paul Clive and by Walter Gibson.

Gibson Walter B. Professional Magic for Amateurs 1947The Honest Gambler.

Guinn, Scott: Magic to Stand By Lecture Notes 2002. The World's Worst Card Player offers a very smart presentation where the performer always loose despite the spectator’s attempt to help him. The Jonah card’s back is very simply but invisibly dotted. Scott, in a very smart way, regains his bets for the climax but still sustaining the fact that when he gets the cards he still cannot win on the money.& http://www.scottfguinn.com/cardmagic.asp The World's WORST Card Player.

Hallas Paul. Small but Deadly 2005 p. 26 offers considerations on the Jonah card principle by Paul who is one of the best world’s specialist of small packet tricks.

Hamman, Brother John: Kabbala , Vol. 3, # 1. 1976 p. 11 Magician vs. Gambler. After a few winning phases the routine allows to change hands which become better and better during this confrontation between a gambler and a magician.

Hartman, J. K.: Onyx [Ken Simmons' magazine] 1999 Mexicali Ruse. A follow up to David Solomon’s Mexican Poker & Card Dupery 2007 p. 181 Mexicali Ruse revised and modified

Horwitz, Basil: Mental Magick of Basil Horwitz Vol. 2 Poker Deal

Jay, Ricky. 1985 Non marketed TV Show 10 Card Poker Deal. The classic multi phases effect but with an outstanding presentation.

Jamison, R.M. Genii, vol. 23, # 12 August 1959. p. 432 A Poker Jolt, using the marking principle, suggests to have the cards dealt by the spectator and to indicate thanks to mental brainwave, which hand is the winner. R. M. Jamison was a regular contributor to The Sphinx where he offered a very nice C&Bs routine including the use of the Shuttle Pass before the name was coined by David Roth.

Jermay, Luke: 10 Card Poker Deal first round is won by the magician chosing first; second round follows the same principle but after a slop shuffle (spectator indicates whether the performer should take a face up or face down card); does the same and when the spectator gets the Jonah card, the other cards are turned face up and the spectator chooses where the cards are going to as the performer bets his sun glasses and then his watch.

Johnson, Nicholas J.: http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......forum=37 SET UP
Take a full deck and remove the spades. Group the remaining cards into values. (e.g. three queens, three aces, three fours etc.) Order each trio of cards hearts - clubs - diamonds.
Place half the spades on top and half on bottom. Write on the back of a $10 note, "two pairs are better than one!"
ROUTINE
Bet the spectator $10 you'll beat him. Put ten dollars on table with writing hidden
Take out the deck and give a false shuffle.
Ask the spectator to cut the deck and complete.
Glimpse the bottom card:
If the bottom card is a diamond, have the spectator deal two hands of poker.
If the bottom card is a club, deal two hands of poker yourself.
If the bottom card is a heart, burn the top card and deal two hands of poker.
If the bottom card is a spade, have the deck cut again
Show that you won the game with two pair over one pair!
Not only that, you also had the extra card that the spectator needed to make three of a kind
Reveal that the money predicted the outcome!

Judah, Stewart: Pallbearers Review, folio 10, Winter special. 1975 p 855 : Draw Poker Demonstration this is not exactly the Jonah card principle but it’s pretty close and allows winning three times in a row.

Kawamoto, Wayne: Easy Magic Tricks: 10 Card Poker is a three phases where twice the performer deals and then, for the third phase, checking the cards face up, notes the position of the Jonah card before secretly deciding whether the performer or the spectator will deal.

King, Bob: http://www.bobkingmagic.com/ Power Poker involves four spectators and a good idea for increasing the money at stake in each phase. There is also a very devious idea for the last phase, using an instruction sheet in an envelope which allows the spectator to handle the cards totally the way he wants and yet for the Jonah card to end up with him no matter what.

Lorayne, Harry: Deck-Sterity; 1967 p 67: Ten Card Poker Deal & The Classic Collection Vol 1 p 300: Ten Card Poker Deal & Lorayne on cards, tome 1 1979 French translation p. 50: La Donne des dix cartes & "Best Ever" collection DVD 2 Ten Card Poker Deal

Lovell, Simon: Billion Dollar Bunko © 2003 L & L Publishing; 1st Edition; p 240 Ten Card Poker

Magix Unlimited: CD Poker the performer shows a CD. On one side are featured about ten cards face up and on the other side about ten cards face down. Invite a spectator to choose your winning hand. To this effect, the spectator will place paper clips on the back of the cards supposed to form the performer’s hand. The remaining cards (non selected) will form the hand of the spectator. Turn the CD over: you hold the winning hand. The spectator lost. He can do whatever pleases him, he will always loose. Thanks to a little subtlety, the performer’s hand will always be the winning one.

Marlo, Edward : The Phoenix # 170 © Feb 11th 1949, page 681 Ten Card Deal: Marlo suggests marking the Jonah card to allow the spectator to shuffle and then according to the position of the Jonah card, to deal or allow the spectator to deal

Maxwell, Michael: Incredible Self-Working Card Tricks Vol 5 DVD series offers the “10-Hand Poker Deal”

Mendoza, John. John : Verse Two 1980 p. 61: The Ten Card Poker Killer, is a four phases routine with a finale which justifies the word “killer” climax using the Louisiana Switch (an actual cheat’s move both very simple and very deceptive).

Murray, John. The Phoenix # 180 du 24 janvier 1949; p. 719 Take Ten adapts the gambling demonstration into a mentalism effect using envelopes and the marking of the Jonah card principle suggested by Ed Marlo. & The Best in Magic p. 194 Take Ten & French translation in Les Merveilles de la prestidigitation moderne p. 204 Prenez dix.

Neale, Robert. Tricks of the Imagination. 1991, p. 125: The Idiot Poker Plot, where the performer is only the mediator in a Poker game where two spectator play against one another.

Ortiz, Darwin: Darwin Ortiz at the Card Table. 1988 p. 29 Mexican Poker is a five phases Routine. Darwin marks the Jonah card with a « wave » (a crimp variant). & At The Card Table DVD 3: Mexican Poker. As usual with Darwin, the classic effect is fine tuned with a lot of little subtleties and doesn’t follow a repetitive pattern.

Ouellet, Gary: Greater Magic Video Library: Magic from Canada Vol 2: Cincinnati Kid. The routine includes a Stud Poker phase and a very entertaining management of the bets.

Porstmann, Mike: The Big Edge (lecture notes). 10-Card Poker. Mike is one of the gambling and cheating-at-gambling authorities in Germany. His 10 card poker deal for the stage has a very strong entertaining value and served as a basis to Bob King’s routine.

Riser, Harry: The Feints and Temps of Harry Riser. 1996 p. 62 Semi-automatic Gambler is a four phases without Jonah card and ending with a Royal Flush. It requires some sleight of hand abilities that is worth knowing anyways.

Scarne, John. Scarne on Card Trick 1950 by John Scarne p. 45 The Dean’s Poker Deal is presented as having been created by « The Dean, a very colorful gambling man from New Jersey »…!?! John Scarne proposes to set up the entire deck to achieve the effect with four different series.

Solomon, David: Onyx N° 3 April 1998 [Ken Simmons' magazine] p. 1 Mexican Poker is a variant of Alex Elmsley’s Power Poker & Magic, Vol. 8, # 12 August 1999 p. 77 Revised Mexican Poker & Arcane n° 128 October 2007, Poker Mexicain, Fred Masschelein’s French translation of the routine’s revised version published in Onyx. This solution deals away with the need to use an additional card and the initial equivoque. At th end, the sucker gets a Full when the performer has a Royal Flush. Set Up: 9P, AP, AT, 9C, AK, 9T, RP, DP, VP, 10P & The Wisdom of Solomon ©2007, Pro-Print, Highland Park IL; p 21 Revised Mexican Poker - 10-card poker deal, originally published in Magic Magazine Aug. 1999. His original "Mexican Poker" was in Onyx Magazine, Apr 1999. John Bannon has a similar(?) version in his “Dear Mr. Fantasy”.

Steinmeyer, Jim. Magic, Vol. 3, # 4 December 1993 p. 56: The Ten Boys Poker Deal, & Impuzzibilities 2002. p. 18 The Ten Boys Poker Deal. Thanks to an orginal set up, the value of the performer’s hand constantly increases when the spectateur never gets anything.

Swain, James. Genii, Vol. 69, # 5 May 2006 p. 26 Showdown Flash version of Showdown using Derek Dingle’s NoLap Switch from The complete Works of Derek Dingle p 85.

Trost, Nick. Cardman’s Secrets Easy to Perform – Hard to Detect. World’s Best Card Miracles. 1964 by H. P. Wisehart (and 1971 Micky Hades Enterprises reprint) p. 5 Great Poker Demonstration. Set up: three Aces, three kings, three queens and a Jack. The routine combines four simple and entertaining phases. & New Tops vol. 14, # 10 October 1974, p. 20 : 10 Card Poker Routine is a three phase routine. & The Card Magic of Nick Trost 1997 p. 109: 10 Card Poker Routine; p. 245 Twenty Deck Poker Deal uses more than 10 cards & Showdown (marketed item) https://loomismagic.com/item16005.htm "Showdown" was marketed as a stand-alone effect and also is explained in his book. The performer shuffles the deck and deals 5 hands of poker. He wins with a full house. This is repeated but this time the performer allows the spectators to trade hands with him at any time. The performer still wins. The performer now plays one on one with one of the spectators with only ten cards. The performer turns over two cards at a time face up allowing the spectator to pick either card for his hand. The performer takes the one remaining. Still the performer wins. Finally he plays a hand of stud poker with he and the spectator each getting a hole card face down. As the remaining four cards are dealt face up, the spectator is allowed to exchange any of his face up cards for any of the performers face up cards. Then he even allows the spectator to exchange hole cards! Finally he allows the spectator to exchange the entire hand if he wishes! Still, the performer wins: after the hands have been dealt, and just before they are turned up to reveal the winner, the performer gives the spectator the opportunity to exchange his hand for yours. If he does... he loses. If he doesn't... he loses. This is Nick Trost's great improvement on the ten card poker deal with a specially printed card that allows the "Jonah" card to change at the performer's will. It’s an eighteen card Poker Deal, excellent routine and the 'Jonah card' changes in each round. An absolute killer routine involving no sleight of hand. The final phase of this routine is just incredible.

Tucker, Stephen: Red Hot Poker aims at guaranteeing to always get a Royal Flush. http://homepages.tesco.net/stephen.tucker1/index.htm The following routines are not variations of the old “Ten Card Poker Deal”, where you only had to ensure that the spectator received one specific card of ten to guarantee that you would win. With that routine you had no idea what kind of hand you would both end up with. The inspiration for the routines in this e-book came after Andrew Hawkes drew my attention to Dave Solomon’s routine mentioned below. Andrew later drew my attention to Andrew Murray’s routine, also mentioned below. However, the basic plot is Alex Elmsley’s from his “Power Poker” on his first videotape “The Magic Of Alex Elmsley, Volume One” (L&L Publishing 1997). It used an extra card (or an equivoque) and several bottom deals. After working on my routines, I emailed Peter Duffie, to see if he had published anything on this plot. He kindly emailed me his “Free Will” routine from his “Deck Direct” book (1998), with permission to include it in this e-book. “Free Will” was also published in Ken Simmons' magazine “Onyx”. In “Free Will” the magician and the spectator received only four cards each. It too used an extra card plus several spelling sequences. Peter cites his inspiration as Alex Elmsley’s “It’s a Small World”, which was first published in “The New Pentagram” in 1974. Then reprinted in “The Complete Works of Alex Elmsley”, Vol.2 (Minch, 1994). This used a very bold ‘behind the back’ ruse where the spectator chose five cards from a packet of ten face down cards. His turned out to be all red cards, leaving you with five black cards. Elmsley said that the plot related to Dr. Daley’s “Rouge et Noir” (Phoenix: No. 287, August 14th 1953, pages 1146 to 1149), and Hans Trixer’s “Noir et Rouge” (Abracadabra: Vol. 17, No. 419, February 6th 1954, pages 35 to 37), which were two of the earliest packet versions of Paul Curry’s “Out of This World”. Several of my own routines use the idea of the magician receiving four aces rather than a Royal Flush, which is more recognizable as a “good” hand to non-card players. However, Peter Duffie beat me to this idea (but only by seven years!) in “Free Will”. Dave Solomon published “Revised Mexican Poker” in MAGIC August 1999, page 76, with credits to John Bannon and Tomas Blomburg for help with the development. Solomon also published “The Power Of Poker” in John Bannon's book "Dear Mr. Fantasy” (2005). To get rid of the bottom deals, Solomon used a selection procedure of Bill Simon’s from “The Four Queens” – “Mathematical Magic” (first published in1944). It’s on p. 178 of the 1993 Dover edition. Andrew Murray (The Magic Circle’s Close-Up Magician of the Year 2004) also published “YOUR CHOICE” in his book “JOKERS NOT INCLUDED” (pages 8 to 10. Produced by ‘NOW YOU SEE IT’ – March 2005), where the spectator received the Straight Flush or Royal Straight Flush – a nice touch. All of these versions have the first two cards kept by you and the spectator (as regular or ‘hole’ cards) then, with the rest of the pairs, the spectator’s chosen card is kept by either you or him, and the other card is put to the bottom of the packet. This change of procedure did not appeal to me. In the Solomon version, the spectator always gets a Full House whilst you get a Straight Flush or a Royal Flush." Stephen Tucker (August 25th 2005). & Royal Flush Guaranteed & Red Faced Poker: spectators choose five cards from the top ten on the deck. They spread their hand and have a pretty good hand like a full house or a four of a kind. You then look at the cards they didn’t select: it’s a Royal Flush (two methods are offered: one with deck return-over and one with lapping). & Alternative & Royal Flush Guaranteed 2: Ten cards are dealt: the spectator chooses his first cards between the two top ones (duck the left one), the second the same, then three are spread to check which one completes his hand the best and duck the other two, then have him choose one between the next two, have him cutting the deck between your two hands and choose the top card that he wants. Confirm that you’ll keep his discards but if he wants, he can change two of his cards anywhere in the deck. Let him show what he has and then turn the cards he rejected: a royal flush (very clean)*** & Palm Power Poker & No Palm Poker & Repositional Poker Deal

Vernon, Dai. Dai Vernon’s Inner Secrets of Card Magic 1959 by Lewis Ganson p. 69 Sure Fire Showdown, Two hands of poker are dealt from a shuffled deck. Set up: three 9, three 5 and three Jacks and a Jonah card.

Vollmer, Richard: "242 Deal" is a variation of the Bannon/Solomon "Power of Poker" effect & Magic October 2006 Two for Two ou la donne des dix cartes & Arcane n° 131 July 2008 [French magazine] p. 4.

Waters, T.A. Deckalogue 1982: Decideal. & Mind, Myth and Magick 1993 p. 206: with Decideal, T.A. Waters offers a prediction effect based on Paul Curry’s Cider, where the performer can announce exactly what the spectator’s hand and his own are made of, when only he chose, two cards by two cards, which ones he would keep and which ones he would leave to the performer.& Mind, Myth and Magick 2005 French Translation by Richard Vollmer.

Weber, Michael:

Wilson, R. Paul: Refried Poker http://www.rpaulwilson.com/circleofconfidence2.htm Download. & Progressive Poker http://www.rpaulwilson.com/circleofconfidence2.htm Download. This version of the Ten Card Poker Deal has taken many years to iron out. It started when Tom Frame fooled me with his version of the trick - a single phase routine that was almost impossible to reconstruct. Since then I have toyed with hundreds of ways to build a three phase routine that ended with the effect Tom showed me. Once I had the first two phases ironed out I decided to try and find a way to remove the need for a complete stack during the last phase. I finally found a way that worked - reconstructed the whole routine and ended with the following effect: From a shuffled deck, two five-card hands are removed and placed face down in front of the spectator. Despite a complete freedom of choice they always pick the losing hand! More cards are added and two hands of "blind seven card stud" are played out. The spectator has all the best cards AND complete freedom of choice but STILL loses! Finally, after the cards are genuinely shuffled, more cards are added and a game of five-card stud is played where the spectator chooses every card for BOTH players and can then switch cards between hands but loses again! In each case the spectator can clearly see where they could have won, had they done things differently. It is this element that makes this routine special. Everything appears fair. There is a palm in the first phase though a no-palm method is also described. This effect is being offered to magicians as an opportunity to be "in the know" before everyone else. The price reflects how highly I consider this routine.

Paul Zenon's Street Magic
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Lawrence O
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Good News: Bob Farmer is preparing a book on the Ten Card Poker deal which will make this list totally obsolete. No need to spend the type of time that I spent in research. Just wait a bit for his book to come out. I've been made aware of part of the additions: we're in for a treat!

I'm looking forward to it impatiently.
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BrainMagos
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What is the Michael Weber reference Lawrence?
Lawrence O
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I've heard that he did a version but I don't know where and when. It's there so that you or some other friends here can check and hopefully share it with the other Café members. Mike is brilliant in strategies so it should definitely be interesting. Now there is a possibility that it wasn't published.

Your help or any member's search is welcome.
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Bob Farmer
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I've asked Michael for permission to include his version in my forthcoming book, THE BAMMO TEN CARD DEAL DOSSIER.

If you want to be on the notice list for this and my new TZU-NAMii Reloaded book, send me an email to bammomagic@cogeco.ca -- I'll send you a couple of free tricks in return, including a TCD.
ryesteve
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Bumping for two reasons:

How's the book coming?

And I was thinking about the variations that guarantee that the winning hand is a Royal Flush, and while it seems appealing at first, after thinking about it, I'm not sure. If the winning hand is a Royal Flush, this suggests to the spectator that the distribution of the 10 cards was precisely forced. Without the Royal Flush, the spectator can more easily believe that there was some randomness to the distribution, and yet somehow the outcome always works out. Thoughts?
Magicmike1949
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Has Farmer's work ever come out?
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It's not an unreasonable point that one weakness could be repetition without a distinctive "payoff" at the end - like, as one example, using a the but card or WOW gimmick to conclude the effect visually and perhaps negate all solutions. Of course as Darwin Ortiz and others have designed their 10-card routines, there is apparently greater, seemingly total, freedom in the spectator's selections, which is directly analogous to the referenced ambitious card endings. That suffices to rescue it from dreary repetition. By contrast, even though a MacDonald Aces routine has the more distinctly separate "payoff" of the four aces coming together, often under the spectator's hand, the effect suffers, a lot, if the three ace vanish/transformations all look exactly the same, and don't operate to introduce variety and disprove possible solutions.And a more "theatrical" payoff or "kicker" - the cards all turn blank or whatever - is likely to be thematically incongruous. Within a well-structured routine not every component need rigidly conform to a prescribed sequence.
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Dear Cameron, thanks for ruining such a great topic!
Yours,

Ivan
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I just fell in love with this great plot! I am surprised no one mentioned the Bruce Cervon version with 25 hands. I think it looks great and has an improvised feel to it at the end. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mh62gQiappU
Yours,

Ivan
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Quote:
On 2013-01-19 14:20, niva wrote:
Dear Cameron, thanks for ruining such a great topic!

DUDE! That was THREE YEARS AGO! I was even IN THE ARGUMENT and I've gotten over it.
Sheesh!
JH5magic
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Ivan - do you know where Cervon's routine is published? I took a quick look in my Ultra Cervon & Cervon Files books and didn't notice anything with a poker title in it. Thanks! John
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Quote:
On 2013-01-19 22:38, JH5magic wrote:
Ivan - do you know where Cervon's routine is published? I took a quick look in my Ultra Cervon & Cervon Files books and didn't notice anything with a poker title in it. Thanks! John


To Pay the Price in Ultra Cervon.
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Quote:
On 2013-01-19 16:35, Steven Youell wrote:
Quote:
On 2013-01-19 14:20, niva wrote:
Dear Cameron, thanks for ruining such a great topic!

DUDE! That was THREE YEARS AGO! I was even IN THE ARGUMENT and I've gotten over it.
Sheesh!


I guess some guys don't always check the date. Necro-posting, I believe it is called.
JH5magic
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Bandaloop - thanks! reading through it now.
niva
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Profile of niva
Well on the web time does not exist. Things you do on the Internet are forever and for everyone to see, sometimes even after you remove them. Some people don't seem to understand this. I just found this great and resourceful topic and these useless posts where still here two and a half years later.

Anyway enough of that!

Yes the YouTube trailer is for his DVDs. It's on one of the volumes.
Yours,

Ivan
Steven Youell
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V.I.P.
3866 Posts

Profile of Steven Youell
Quote:
On 2013-01-20 02:47, niva wrote:
Well on the web time does not exist. Things you do on the Internet are forever and for everyone to see, sometimes even after you remove them. Some people don't seem to understand this.

Perhaps you should look up the term "netiquette".

You were calling someone out on a post they made three years ago.
He could be a completely different person.
He could have changed his mind by now.
He could even be dead.

So what I'm suggesting is:

1) Just check the dates before you post.
2) Try and not dedicate a post to calling someone out. (I've done this and paid dearly for it.)
3) Learn to admit a mistake when you make one-- like not checking the dats of a thread.
tomsk192
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Inner circle
3894 Posts

Profile of tomsk192
Quote:
On 2013-01-20 02:47, niva wrote:
Well on the web time does not exist.


What utter nonsense.
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