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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Polly wants a cracker... » » Rabbit teeth problem (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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p.b.jones
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Inner circle
Milford Haven. Pembrokeshire wales U.K.
2642 Posts

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Hi,
Ask a vet to check the back teeth, often overgrowth of the back teeth causes problems in the front ones this is particularly prevelant in rabbits who develop the problems later in life, have you noticed any watering/weeping around the eyes?
actualy the teeth problem is common last tuesday I had the front teeth on one of my bunnies removed because of this very problem. they had to trim the back teeth and they have to put the bunny out for this so I had the front ones removed at the same time as they badly overgrow and once they have been trimed they tend to get miss-alighned and that makes it more difficult for knawing to maintain their length
phillip
Decomposed
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Eternal Order
High Desert
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Phillip,

I haven't noticed any watering etc....how much they charge you to remove the teeth?

Thanks

C
Posted: Feb 10, 2005 9:38pm
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Trimmed them again today, a little bit easier:)
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Bob Johnston
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Inner circle
Philadelphia, PA
1251 Posts

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Malocclusion in the domestic rabbits is very common due to eating conditions. This is why the owner of rabbits should pay attention to what is fed to the rabbit. The rabbit is “designed” to eat grass and straw type things much like a horse. In fact they share the horses digestive system. This is the shortcoming of the pellet type foods. Your rabbit should always have Timothy and a little Alfalfa in the cage. Green veggies are also important is small amounts. Regular Iceberg lettuce is useless to your rabbit. Romaine and other green leafy things are very good. I always give my rabbit the outside leaf or two of romaine, the dark green ones.

Rabbits teeth are not constructed like ours. They grow constantly as it is assumes (by nature) that they will be chewing all day long on things and be wearing them down. When this does not happen, the teeth can grow up from the bottom, out of the mouth and into the nose and face. The top teeth tend to grow “painfully” into the back of the mouth.

Interestingly enough, this condition is almost never found in the wild rabbit, unless other dental conditions make it painful for the rabbit to chew. My wife volunteers at an animal rescue center and has never seen malocclusion in a wild rabbit. Rabbits teeth are made from the same thing your fingernails are made from (Keratin I think.)

The toys I have in my rabbits cage are all wood and she has rounded them all by gnawing on them and throwing them around. If she did not have this and the straw to chew on, she would run a big risk of malocclusion. It is very important to have hay available all the time in the cage or hutch, along with plenty of water. If you are feeding your rabbit once or twice a day but with no straw or hay in the cage at all times, you will likely have a malocclusion problem eventually.

Also, if you are forcing your rabbit to live on wire flooring, check the hocks (hind legs) for wear. The fur should be thick on bottoms of these weight bearing legs to give them some protection from the un-naturalness of the wire flooring of some hutches.

A breeder is not the best place to go to for Malocclusion advice. Their priorities are to breed and fatten up rabbits as soon as possible. For them, the pellet type foods are a logical answer to the fattening procedure.

Bob
glodmagic
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Special user
USA
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Excellent post Wellington. I have had experience in this area as well.
Your advice is an excellent summary to this thread.
Remember ANY of your posts here can be Googled by your customers and Clients. Just entering your name in Google can bring up your negative comments that stay for years!
Decomposed
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Eternal Order
High Desert
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Dittos, Bob has been a tremendous and generous help to me on the Café. I always have hay availble, grass and occasionally Timothy. My dwarfs just don't chew on wood:( I have put toilet paper rolls, commercial toys, round untreated and square wood.
Regan
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Inner circle
U.S.A.
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Try some apple tree branches Candini. My rabbits love them.

Regan
Mister Mystery
Decomposed
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Eternal Order
High Desert
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Thanks Regan.....I will keep an eye out, not many out here in my neck of the woods......
Dayle
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Canada
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You might want to be careful with those toilet paper/paper towel rolls! My sister had a gerbil years ago that loved to chew on those things and over time we noticed that he would get "high" on the glue that was still on the roll! Needless to say, she stopped giving him those rolls to chew on Smile

Cheers
Dayle
World's Most Accomplished Female Escape Artist
http://www.sherryandkrallmagic.com
Bob Johnston
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Inner circle
Philadelphia, PA
1251 Posts

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Dayle:
How does one conclude that their Gerbil is high?

Bob
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