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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Pasteboard Frolics » » Double jointedness... (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

jessicashurtz
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As I was reading through some of the 80 replies (and over 2000 views) on the TCC thread (to which I can really contribute nothing) I was (like normal) dribbling and springing some cards to sort of occupy my hands when I noticed that my fingers were really hurting.

although I'm not double jointed in the sense that I can touch my thumb to my wrist, my fingers are double jointed so that I can bend just the top knuckle; whenever I do dribble/springs, the knuckle sort of locks in like that, and after a while, it really, really hurts my fingers to have the single knuckle bent like that and putting pressure in on the cards (so I stop...)

I was just curious whether anyone had anything to say about double-jointedness and whether it has any effect at all on flourishing (or magic) or related problems like that?

and maybe this is a bit of a stretch for a topic but it seemed better than arguing about de'vo or motions and whatnot again...
-j
4Jacks
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That's a really good question. I guess I'm the opposite, I can touch my thumb to my wrist, but I can not bend only the top joint in any of my fingers. Sometimes I get some pains in the same joints though, when I'm messing with the deck for over an hour or something. It's pretty easy to put a warm pack on the hand and ease the pain. But what about the long term effects, are we going to get major arthritis when we’re older? What about people who play guitar and piano all there lives, do they have similar problems?? I guess we need an orthopedic doctor on this forum.
Brickster
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There are flourishers and artists that have handled cards all of their life. They don't get arthritis or joint problems on a regular basis. They would be getting it just like everyone else gets it, old age or a predisposition.
jessicashurtz
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I was really more curious whether it was an advantage or disadvantage for flourishes to anyone Smile apparently not a good thread at all... oh well Smile
-j
4Jacks
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Quote:
On 2005-02-25 15:09, Brickster wrote:
There are flourishers and artists that have handled cards all of their life. They don't get arthritis or joint problems on a regular basis. They would be getting it just like everyone else gets it, old age or a predisposition.


I think without a doubt, Jerry has to have the most hours under his belt as far as handling the cards. But unfortunately, (for this conversation) Jerry isn’t Old. He’s older than me, and probably most everyone on this board, but he’s not old old… I don’t know how old he is, but he’s not old enough to be worrying about arthritis just yet.

I’m sure there are millions of older card sharps and magicians that know their way around the deck. But they don’t have the hours upon hours of hard core finger flipping that people nowadays are putting on. Let’s face it, doing a Double Lift, Palming a Card, Second and Bottom Dealing, There all like taking a leisure stroll instead of running the mile in 5 minutes. And now we have all these kids 10-16 years old spending 4 hours minimum doing some serious card manipulation. If they continue that up their whole lives, it has got to effect them either for the good or worse. I’m comparing it to people who have played the Piano there whole lives, I can’t really think of anything else people would spend hours upon hours EVERY day that serious challenges the hands.

Well I guess I’m showing my age… I’m getting up there, past that teenage “I’m invisible” feeling… Now I’m think.. darn I better stop this I might get complications.

I guess we’ll see when Jerry gets older!!

Quote:
On 2005-02-26 00:59, jessicashurtz wrote:
I was really more curious whether it was an advantage or disadvantage for flourishes to anyone Smile apparently not a good thread at all... oh well Smile


Sorry, I took it off topic

As far as Flourishes that only double jointed people could do….. Hmmmmm… I’d say don’t invent any that you can only do with that bending the finger at the last joint… Mainly because I can’t do that. Also I think it looks weird kinda freaks me out.
Tysmagic
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On making flourishes easier (I get to bring up a move from De’vo, yay) my thumb is double jointed and I can balance a birdie fan on it much easier having it be that way. There is one problem I have with it though, I find myself constantly pushing my thumbs in and out of the joint. This soon becomes painful and, since it is out of habit, it's hard to stop. I also think I pop it in and out when I do drum stick flourishes, but since I am concentrating on the flourish I don't realize it. So I'm not quite positive on it.

As for getting older and having arthritis I don't see how being double jointed would cause it, along with card handling all/most of your life. I know popping your knuckles is bad if you do it a lot. Being double jointed doesn't seem to have an obvious effect on it, well my teenaged opinion says this, and flourishing would also appear to make the hands more nibble.


:dance:
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liltut
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I Play Guitar, Drums, Bass, And multiple Brass Instruments, on top of card fourishes, magic, and writing 3 page esays. My Hands Do occosaonaly hurt, especialy right where carple tunnel thing is.... my dad had the same problem(he plays drumms and guitar)and had surgury for carple tunnel. My brother(guitar, bass) has a similar problem. I think Im in some deep crap.
4Jacks
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Dude you have to start sretching you wrist like everyday.
Carpel tunnel is avoidable..
I'm sure the doctor gave your dad some stretches to do, when he had surgery
Start doing those.
My father in law had the same thing.
brokin6
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Jessica, I have been able to lock the first joint of my middle and ring fingers on both hands since I was a kid (long time ago) and I also play guitar and am a computer tech. I have never had any problems with the joints locking while springing or dribbling and I think it's mainly because it only happens voluntarily. By that I mean I make them lock when I want but have never had problems with them locking on their own. Have you ever had an injury to your hand? Maybe this will go away but if it hurts you might want to see someone about it. Hope everything works out. Nice card throwing by the way. Oz
Why does coin magic make my head hurt!?!
jessicashurtz
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No, I can't NOT make them lock when I do dribble or a spring (i cheat, use my ring finger... pinky's not strong enough). unless I hold it further up the finger, but then I can't execute the move. it's ok though, it only starts hurting after I've been doing it repeatedly if I'm doing something boring where I'm just sitting around and there happens to be a deck around. and, I play tennis, so my hands/wrists/arms get a lot of wear and tear, but I've never had an injury involving those areas. really not necessary to have it checked out though, if it hurts, I just stop doing it.

I wasn't even aware I was double jointed in my fingers until someone showed me the weird finger thing a few years ago and I realised I could do it. pre-card days...

thx about the card throwing. it makes my muscles really sore since I'm not used to the movement. very fun though.
-j
joeytsai
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Supposedly, people with hypermobile fingers ("double jointed" is medically inaccurate) are less likely to have arthritis. But it's sort of hard to tell from your description whether your fingers are just getting sore from playing with cards too much or whether the action itself is causing you pain. I'm guessing it's the former, and if so I'm sure you're all right.

And using a Dvorak keyboard helps your fingers out as well. ;o) If you're a serious computer user like me, I'd recommend a Kinesis keyboard.
kxxcheng
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Could it be? A fellow dvorak user?

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Karen
joeytsai
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I've been a Dvorak user for about 7 years now. But even with a classic Dvorak layout your thumbs (which are quite strong) are under-utilized, and your weak pinky has to push the regularly-used Enter and Backspace keys. That's where the Kinesis keyboard I mentioned makes your typing even better.
jessicashurtz
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Quote:
On 2005-04-04 15:16, joeytsai wrote:
Supposedly, people with hypermobile fingers ("double jointed" is medically inaccurate) are less likely to have arthritis. But it's sort of hard to tell from your description whether your fingers are just getting sore from playing with cards too much or whether the action itself is causing you pain. I'm guessing it's the former, and if so I'm sure you're all right.

And using a Dvorak keyboard helps your fingers out as well. ;o) If you're a serious computer user like me, I'd recommend a Kinesis keyboard.


I'm sure it's a combination of both that contributes to pain. it's paniful to just sit there and try to lock them in position.

but honestly, if something hurts, I just stop doing it, and it only hurts after I've been dribbling for a long time. NOT a serious problem...

I did switch to dvorak last summer though (aoeusnth) it's better; I even got a dvortyboard but I mean, I'm not a comp programmer or something, and cards probably gives my fingers a nice enough workout. I'm not really concerned about it or anything and I doubt I'd spend the money on a keyboard that I won't be able to use for several years anyway.
-j
sharpie
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I have all double jointed fingers.
It looks weird when I apply pressure like flexing.
but nothin else is wrong with them
Magicman8
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One thing to say about double jointed-ness... Eww It freaks me out.
I would definitely see a doctor about this problem, though. If it caauses you pain don't do it,but if your fingers hurt NOT donig it, you should get that looked at in case it is some thing serious.

Matthias
We go through life backwards. The past is visible and the future is cloudy, it seems we are walking backwards.-- Terry Pratchet
themaji
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I have double jointed thumbs. It helps when I do stuff like CTG and stuff like that. It looks freaky though...
jessicashurtz
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Quote:
On 2005-04-06 08:10, Magicman8 wrote:
One thing to say about double jointed-ness... Eww It freaks me out.
I would definitely see a doctor about this problem, though. If it caauses you pain don't do it,but if your fingers hurt NOT donig it, you should get that looked at in case it is some thing serious.

Matthias


no, really, there isn't anything wrong with them... it only hurts after I've been doing it for like more than 10 min or something, or just really obsessively. but really, not a serious problem... thanks for all of your concern though.
-j
Mad Mat
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Is daryl double jointed?
JJDrew
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Okay, replying to your original question about whether these double-jointed digits could be made useful somehow, the answer is probably, but you'll have to find a method yourself. Because it isn't that common an ability, few people have played with the idea of using it for anything.

I have double jointed shoulders (I can twist my arms around so that they look like they've been stuck on backwards). I do my own variation on the Reality Twister, in which after the pen is shown to be twisted, I warn them that a variation in the motion would have twisted their fingers rather than the pen. This gets a laugh at which I respond, "No really. In fact, I was doing a stage size version of this trick once, they moved the lens incorrectly, and my arms (I twist them around at this point) haven't been the same since."

It's great because the audience invariably thinks that the arm twisting is also some kind of illusion and tries to do it themselves.

Lock your fingers in their funky positions and play with the cards. Everything has the potential to be useful, all you have to do is figure out how. If you do, you'll have a move or routine that no-one else can do, even if they want to (unless, of course, they share your double-jointedness).
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