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Mya Angel
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Okay guys, I got this at work and somehow it seemed appropriate to bring it here.

See how much you really know.


Smile Houdini Trivia Quiz Smile

1. What is Harry Houdini's real name?

2. Where was Houdini born?

3. Which of the following was not one of Houdini's accomplishments:

a. Movie Producer
b. Actor
c. Magician
d. Had 3 children
e. Escape Artist
f. Exposer of fraudulent mediums
g. 1st person to pilot an airplane to Australia

4. How did Houdini die?

a. During his Water Torture Cell Illusion
b. A ruptured appendix
c. In his sleep
d. Driving

5. What was Houdini's wife's full name?

6. What president did Houdini meet while on a steamship headed to the USA?

7. What was Houdini's trick called that helped launch his career?

8. In what city did Houdini die?

9. How many sisters and brothers did Houdini have?

a. 5
b. 4
c. 3
d. 0

10. True or false: Houdini was double jointed?

11. What was Houdini's shoe size?

We work hard at my "place of Business" Smile

Have fun. Smile

Mya
Smile

:thehat: Smile Smile Smile Smile
There is nothing that remains so constant as change. Don't end up like concrete, all mixed up and permanently set. Smile



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Peter Marucci
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1: Erich Weiss
2: Budapest, Hungary
3: Had 3 children (he couldn't; he was sterile)
4: Ruptured appendix
5: Wilhemina Beatrice Rahner
6: Probably McKinley, I'm guessing; but it could be Teddy Roosevelt
7: Metamorphosis
8: Detroit
9: 5, I think.
10: False
11: Huh?

Peter's House of Useless Knowledge, open 24/7
Justin Flom
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Very good Peter! I don't know if all of it's right. I was in Appelton, WI and saw all the Houdini handcuffs and stuff there. I heard that every Halloween, some people get together to see if Houdini will come back from the dead. Wierd.

Justin
vinsmagic
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Justin, the Amazing Randi had a TV special several years ago on that very topic. Aaah, Peter, I really believe Houdini was Italian. Just kidding

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Peter Marucci
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Vinny,
Even though he wasn't -- HE SHOULD HAVE BEEN!
Seance
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Peter,
On question no. 6, Houdini met President Roosevelt on the steamer. Also presented a mentalism slate effect that showed the "secret" location of where Roosevelt had been earlier.
(From the book, "Making it Bizarre Vol. 2" by
Nigel Gordon)
Dennis Michael
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Double Jointed means: Having joints that will bend freely and at unusual angles.

Contortionist means: An acrobat who can twist his or her arms, legs, and body into unusual positions.

Houdini wrote, in his autobiography, "October 28, 1883 was the date of my first appearance before an audience. I appeared as a contortionist and trapeze performer..."

Therefore, based on the above definitions and Houdini's own word, I would say true to 10: Houdini was double jointed.

Seance is right about Teddy Roosevelt meeting with Houdini in 1914 and performing a slate trick.

There were 6 boys and a baby girl in the Weiss family. (7 total including Eric) but that choice is not one of the options. (The Great Houdini by Williams and Epstein, Copyright 1950, pg 16.)

As for his Number 11: Shoe size, you didn't ask at what age, so any number from 1-9 would be correct. He was a small person (5 foot 8 inces) so his shoe size would most likely not be much higher than a nine. However, you are most likely looking for 7-1/2 for shoe size!

From the Amazing WhoDENi...My younger days (1950's)...and from my library on Houdini.
Dennis Michael
AllThumbs
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4) More accurately, Houdini died of peritonitis (caused by a ruptured appendix).

While the answer to question 3 is D, he didn't fly TO Australia as far as I am aware (the plane was taken in a boat), but he was the first to fly IN Australia.

Regards,

Kris Sheglova
The above is all rubbish, except that which you chose to believe
Peter Marucci
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Actually, there is some dispute as to whether he was even the first person to fly a plane IN Australia.
x-treem
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Quote:
On 2002-10-29 10:54, AllThumbs wrote:
4) More accurately, Houdini died of peritonitis (caused by a ruptured appendix)


Alright, someone else is on board with me on this! Beyond myself and one other, no one ever mentions peritonitis.

Oddly enough, his appendix was on the wrong (opposite) side of his body as well. This little known fact appears in a letter from Walter B. Gibson to escape artist Norm Bigelow. kind of Smile
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AllThumbs
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The best biographical book I've ever come across is Ken Silverman's "Houdini!!!" which is an excellent read.

The quote given is:

His ruptured appendix was removed - "a great long affair," Dr Kennedy said, "which started in the right lower pelvis where it normally should, extended across the midline and lay in his left pelvis."

Which is not quite the same as having the appendix on the wrong side. Just abnormally long. Ken's biography gives the exact cause of death as: "Diffuse peritonitis (Streptococcic)"

Stating it was peritonitis is more precise. It's a bit like saying it was an axe that killed Charles I. Well that's true, but more precisely it was his head becoming detached from his body that caused his death. Maybe I'm just being petty on this one!

Peter is quite right in saying that Houdini's first flight in Australia is in dispute. Fred Custance is said to have flown the day before. However, his flight did not fit within the rules for officially recorded flights, and as such, in my opinion should be discounted (it's a bit like people who break world records today but don't do it within the rules).

Regards,

Kris Sheglova

Oh, I forgot to say:

If anyone is taking part in a 'Houdini Seance' tonight, please reconsider. I'm sure Houdini is fed up with being bugged with pleas to get through every year! Smile

Regards,

Kris Sheglova
The above is all rubbish, except that which you chose to believe
DavidEscapes
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Quote:
On 2002-10-30 02:33, x-treem wrote:
Quote:
On 2002-10-29 10:54, AllThumbs wrote:
4) More accurately, Houdini died of peritonis (caused by a ruptured appendix)


Alright someone else is on board with me on this! Beyond myself and one other, no one ever mentions peritonitis.

Oddly enough, his appendix was on the wrong (opposite) side of his body as well. This little known fact appears in a letter from Walter B. Gibson to escape artist Norm Bigelow. kind of Smile


Actually, Ruth Brandon's book, 'The Life and Many Deaths of Houdini,' blames his death on peritonitis, too.

Duncan
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Mya Angel
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Quote:
On 2002-10-31 13:53, AllThumbs wrote:
oh, I forgot to say:

If anyone is taking part in a 'Houdini Sceance' tonight, please reconsider, I'm sure Houdini is fed up with being bugged every year with pleas to get through every year! Smile

Regards,

Kris Sheglova


:hrmph: Well..... There goes my evening. Smile

Smile Smile Smile

Mya
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There is nothing that remains so constant as change. Don't end up like concrete, all mixed up and permanently set. Smile



He who slings mud will surely lose ground.
Grandillusionsmagic
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What is Houdini's birthday? I have eard/read several different dates. Does anybody know? I have just been wondering.

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Marvello
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Sorry folks- I realize this is an old post, but there is lots of misinformation here:

Houdini was not the first person to fly an airplane in Australia - he was the first person to take off and land a plane successfully in australia, and it was a plane that he had imported for the event. He did not fly the plane "over" Australia - he only flew briefly, not over the entire continent. His record is for the first controlled powered aeroplane flight in Australia (meaning takeoff and landing without crashing).

Quote:
Harry Houdini was to visit Australia on a theatrical tour, so the Aerial League undertook to invite him to bring his Viosin biplane with him, mindful of the publicity such a flight would generate in their attempts to promote aviation. By March 1910, Houdini had his aircraft at Diggers Rest, outside Melbourne, along with Ralph Banks, an American, who had brought a Wright Flyer down from Sydney. Banks was determined to beat Houdini into the air and attempted a flight on 1st March, only to have a sharp gust of wind cause his aircraft to dive into the ground after take off, smashing it completely; Banks escaped with minor injuries.

Houdini’s other competitor was a Bleriot monoplane, which had been purchased by an Adelaide businessman who had visited Europe and England in the hope of finding an aircraft capable of being demonstrated and sold in Australia. While he was in England, the French flier, Louis Bleriot had flown from France to Dover in England, creating a storm of controversy about the vulnerability of England to an Armada of flying machines and gained himself, and his aircraft, a great measure of excellent publicity. Mr. Jones, the Adelaide businessman concerned, recognised the achievement of Bleriot and his aircraft and paid ₤1,000 in advance, for a Bleriot type XI monoplane, powered by a 24hp Anzini rotary engine. This aircraft, an advanced type for the time, employed primary flight controls, which would be recognisable today. A control column was used with a series of levers and cranks to “warp” or alter the shape of the wing, in order that the amount of lift developed by the wing to be increased or decreased, a rudder bar operated by the pilot’s feet, allowed the aircraft to veer right or left, and a forward or rearward movement of control column would cause the nose rise or fall in flight.

The Bleriot arrived in South Australia and Mr. Jones engaged an engineer, Bill Wittber, to assemble and rig the aircraft. Bill’s ability as an engineer and his interest in aviation, wetted by such magazines as “Flight”, made him an excellent choice for the job. Assisted by Fred Custance, the machine was assembled and displayed in John Martin’s store in Rundle Street, Adelaide. From there it moved to Bolivar, a country town outside Adelaide, where the first attempts at flying it were to be made. At this point, none of those involved had ever flown an aircraft! The Bleriot manual was consulted carefully and on 13th March, the aircraft was run around the paddock with Wittber at the controls. The machine struck a tussock, lurched into the air and after about 15 metres, landed. Whilst it was only a short distance and Wittber never claimed it as a flight, it was landed without damage. On the morning of 17th March, 1910, Custance is believed to have taxied the aircraft around the same paddock several times. It is claimed that he later was able to make a successful take-off and achieved a short flight, however, another attempt resulted in the aircraft apparently stalling and crashing causing extensive damage to the propellor, undercarriage and wheels. Subsequently, it was returned to Adelaide for repairs and was later destroyed by fire while in storage that winter. (Unfortunately some confusion remains in respect of these claims but they may well represent the first flights to take place in Australia.)

While little publicity attended the efforts in South Australia, those of Harry Houdini at Diggers Rest received wide reporting. Houdini had a full understanding of the value of publicity and there were a number of would-be aviators, including Banks, present at Diggers Rest for his initial flights and his efforts were widely reported in the newspapers of the day.

Following the advice of his mechanic, a Mr. Brassac, Houdini waited until the 18th March, when weather conditions were perfect and taxied the aircraft to test the engine and controls. Then he opened the throttle, the engine roared and the aircraft surged toward a clump of trees and then soared skyward and stayed aloft for a minute. He landed safely and went on to fly on two or more occasions that day and on the 21st March flew for seven minutes. Undoubtedly, Houdini had mastered the ability to pilot an aircraft in controlled powered flight and would go on to give further demonstrations at Rose Hill in Sydney. Houdini’s Voisin aircraft resembled an enlarged powered version of the box kites, which Hargrave had experimented with some fifteen years earlier. Powered by a 60-hp ENV engine the Voisin was a type that amassed considerable flying hours in Europe, and while, perhaps, not as advanced as the Bleriot monoplane, was certainly capable of sustained flight in the hands of an experienced pilot.


He also did not die from "appendicitis which was caused by the blow to his stomach." In the aftermath of Houdini's death, the assumption was made that the blows to his stomach and his ruptured appendix were related. It seemed a logical conclusion at the time, even to his doctors, and so the legend began. With the advantage of several decades of hindsight, however, we now know this explanation to be impossible: no cases of acute appendicitis caused by physical trauma have since been documented. The blows to Houdini's stomach may indeed have hastened his death, but in a way different than commonly believed: he was likely already suffering from appendicitis at the time Whitehead struck him, and he may have written off his subsequent stomach pain as being caused by the punches he took rather than the appendicitis. Had the dressing room incident not occurred, Houdini might have realized the pain was an indicator that something was very wrong and not delayed so long in seeking medical treatment.

Here is some more interesting info about Houdini:

Houdini’s parents named him Ehrich Weiss, but Ehrich changed his name when he became a member of the magic team called the Houdini Brothers. He and his friend Jacob Hyman called themselves Harry and Jacob Houdini, respectively. The teenagers named themselves after their idol, the popular French magician Robert-Houdin. Jacob later dropped out of the act to perform on his own as Jacob Houdini. He eventually gave up magic to become a doctor. Ehrich Weiss made Harry Houdini his legal name in 1913. Houdini performed as a Houdini Brother with his real life brother Theodore for almost a year in 1894. Theodore went on to become an escape artist known as Hardeen.
Never criticize someone else until you have walked a mile in their shoes. Then, when you do criticize them, you will be a mile away from them and you will have their shoes.
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