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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » New to magic? » » Necessary stuff to get and learn to become a decent cardician (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Steven Leung
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Dear all,

I have been into the magic world for about 18 months. The following are videos and gimmicks I have collected and am learning so far.

MacDonald Aces, Scotch & Soda, Ultra Card Rise, Eye Exam, Disappearing Card Case, Appearing Card Wallet, Hot Rod, Color Rod, The Raven, Color Book, Ben Harris Alida, Hollow, Chinese Linking Rings, Svengali deck, Mike Powers Dimishing Returns...these are major ones, not to mention Tenyo stuff.

For videos, I have Dante King's Pratical Methods, Ellusionist's How to do Street Magic & Ninja 2, Paul Green's Classic Force, Michael Ammar's The Amazing Secrets of Card Magic, Icebreaker, Easy to Master Card Miracles Volume 5, Lee Asher's Well Done & 5 Card Stud, Richard Kaufman's Basic Card Technique and On the Pass. I have Ray Kosby's Impossible Card Magic and Guy Hollingworth's The London Collection currently, but the skill required is just too darn difficult.

However, I strongly sense that my basic skills need to be polished badly in order to become a decent cardician. Your input on which books, DVDs and methods I should pratice is highly welcome. Please reply or PM me. Thanks.
Most memorable moment - with Maestro Juan Tamariz & Consuelo Lorgia in FISM Busan 2018.

"Being fooled by a trick doesn't always mean they are having a good time" - Homer Liwag

https://hhpresents.com/
https://www.glitchstudiohk.com/
Alex W.
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This site has some good advice on it: Here
secondbaseman
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Hey there,

Is it easy to learn out of a book? I think it's easier to learn when you see things on a video. All those book are in English and sometimes I don't understand it. So my question again, is the learning part of Royal Road to Card Magic easy to follow?

Thanks in advance,

Niels
stevehw
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It was highly recommended to me that I obtain at least the first volume of Card College, but I purchased all four and have found it to be a great resource for both basic and advanced card technique.
As for other books and videos, I can only pass on what recommendations have been made to me.
Royal Road to Card Magic (Book)
Expert Card Technique (Book)
Close-up Card Magic (Book)
Daryl's Encyclopedia of Card Sleights (Video)

Steve
Rod Lages
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Royal Road to Card Magic and Card College are the best one to begin with. Daryl´s Encyclopedia of Card Sleights (all volumes) are great too. You didn´t mentioned what kind of problems you have. Is it the double lift or maybe you can´t do the pass invisibly? There are good videos and books just about double lift or passes, for instance, Gregory Wilson's Double Take Video
is a great resource of double lift.

Best Regards,
Rod Lages
"Confusion isn't Magic" - Dai Vernon
Steve Friedberg
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Freak:
Your post indicates you want to be a decent *cardician.* That's an admirable goal; I'd remind you that the phrase is most often used in connection with Ed Marlo, who must be considered to be among the top card handlers of all time. (Randy Wakeman, feel free to chime in here.)

My goals are more modest; I tend to focus on those effects I can repeatedly and convincingly pull off, through the use of an ungaffed deck. (I do, however, carry Phil Goldstein's B'wave with me in my b'wallet. Smile )

My advice is to stick with one or two of the books or tapes you have already purchased (I'd recommend the Ammar tape up top, since his methods of instructions are superb), and just practice, practice, practice. It's not going to happen in a day or week...but it *will* happen. Then perform for a friend who's trusted...and will give you honest feedback. And then, learn some more.

And depending where you live, join a local magic club, or go to a magic shop...once people there see your interest is genuine, many will work with you to help you hone your skills.

Good luck.
Cheers,
Steve

"A trick does not fool the eyes, but fools the brain." -- John Mulholland
AndrewG
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Freak,

I'm in a similar position to you. I started card magic about 6 months ago. I've checked out the basic books quite extensively. It seems to me the traditional way to go was Royal Road To Card Magic then Expert Card Technique by the same authors.

My impression though is that Card College, the full series, will supercede the older books. It is a complete course from basics to advanced and modern in its layout.

I've found that when performing what I thought were quite impressive effects such as "Gathering of the Clan" from RRTCM that the reaction wasn't always, WOW! I wasn't busted, but I didn't present the effect properly. Hence my second bit of advice. Have a look at Stong Magic by Darwin Ortiz. It's a book on presentation technique for close up magic. I'm reading it right now and I think it will go some way to help solve my lack-of WOW response problem.

If you need further inspiration, people speak very well of Smoke and Mirrors by John Bannon and Close Up Card Magic by Lorayne.

Best wishes
Andrew
Jim Davis
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Quote:
On 2002-11-03 10:17, stevepr104 wrote:
(I do, however, carry Phil Goldstein's B'wave with me in my b'wallet. Smile )


I gotta get a b'wallet!

The books that I have really enjoyed over the years are John Bannon's Smoke and Mirrors and Harry Lorayne's Close Up Card Magic. You can't go wrong with either.

I do agree with the above posts regarding Ammar's videos and Daryl's videos. I like Ammar's style of teaching better.

The real seceret is to practice, not just the mechanics, but the patter or presentation as well. Every time I practice, whether it is in front of mirror, camcorder or spouse, I always say my lines and practice as if I was in front of my audience.

If you can do that, the mechanics just won't matter as much.
Diamond Jim Davis "The Cardslinger" ~~~ Magic from the '80's....................the 1880's!
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<BR><BR>Don't just be a magician, be a human interest!
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tla
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Ambitious,
Before you spend more money on books, videos or effects, pick two or three (effects) that you currently own and work on them. I see you have one of Ammar's videos. Perhaps start there. And, if you could find a friend interested in magic, you could work together, discussing and practicing the sleights and effects.
Peter Marucci
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Ambitious,
I notice that you only mention gimmicks and visuals (tapes, DVDs, etc.).
But almost everything that you mention in the "gimmick" area can be done without gimmicks, meaning that you are never stuck because you "don't have something with you."
And, good as visuals may be, they cannot give you the depth and thought of books.
Visuals will give you the handling by one person and you run the risk of becoming a clone of that person.
Books, on the other hand, actually force you to think! (Unheard of today!) You will be much, much further ahead in the long run if you go with books:
Bobo's Modern Coin Magic (a "must-have" but not just for coin workers)
Harry Lorayne's The Magic Book (a personal favorite; if you want to polish your basic skills, this is the book)
Plus the others, mentioned above by those who are more skilled in cards than I am.


Smile
Steven Leung
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Dear fellow magicians,

I am glad to hear different points of view. All of you gave me priceless information and the direction I need to go.

I would like to summarize your points of view as follows:

1) Practice some tricks that I familiar with and master them. As I accomplish them, then I will have several tricks to perform!

2) Watch videos that I own and learn more tricks.

3) Join magic club (n/a in my place) or visit magic shop frequently to polish my skill with shopkeepers.

4) Get books recommended by fellow magicians and use my imagination to develop my magic world.

I got it! I hope that my skill will be better in future!
Most memorable moment - with Maestro Juan Tamariz & Consuelo Lorgia in FISM Busan 2018.

"Being fooled by a trick doesn't always mean they are having a good time" - Homer Liwag

https://hhpresents.com/
https://www.glitchstudiohk.com/
Jim Morton
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Quote:
On 2002-11-02 22:36, secondbaseman wrote:
Hey there, is it easy to learn out of a book? I think its easier to learn when you see things on a video, all those book are in english and sometimes I dont understand it. So my question again is the learning part of royal road to card magic easy to follow?

Thanks in advance

Niels


Niels,

As others have noted, the Card College books are one of the best places to learn card magic. I don't know what your native tongue is, but if it's German, you're in luck. The Card College series was originally printed in German as Grosse Kartenschule. I do not know if it is translated into any other languages besides English.

Jim
John Clarkson
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Quote:
On 2002-11-02 22:06, Ambitious Card Freak wrote:
...

However, I strongly sense that my basic skills need to polish badly in order to become a decent cardician. Your input on which books, DVD and method on which I should pratice is highly welcome, please reply or PM me. Thanks.


Freak:

Ed Marlo's "The Cardician" is a good way to start on the path to quality card magic. You can do no better than Ed Marlo, and "The Cardician" is a great entry point.

Smile
John D. Clarkson, S.O.B. (Sacred Omphaloskeptic Brotherhood)
Cozener

"There is nothing more important to a magician than keeping secrets. Probably because so many of them are Gay."
—Peggy, from King of the Hill (Sleight of Hank)
Brad Burt
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Hello:

However you attack gaining superior skill with cards you will want to attack gaining that skill by an emphasis upon the basics. Magic is much like learning to play a musical instrument. You will ALWAYS go back to those basic skill sets that allow the widest range of use and lead to and allow the acquisition of other moves with the least amount of trial.

Card College books on the book end are the finest, bar none, books for this. They are systematic and lead forward in a logical manner as the material gets more difficult.

The Daryl Encyclopedia tapes are NOT a good starting point as they are exactly what they say: A huge compendium of moves taught expertly, but with dispatch. If you had the first Card College book under your belt the Daryl videos would be PERFECT for watching and selecting items that you wish to add to your collection of moves, etc.

On the video side of things you might want to take a look at my Basic Card Course consisting of my videos numbers 4, 6, 10 and 11. I ran, designed the classes, taught the material in four different magic schools for over 20 years. I then put that experience into videos designed NOT for those who know magic, but for those just getting into it. I DO repeat in a manner designed to help a student learn the material as quickly as possible. The material is also selected to be virtually 100% useful and without filler. In every single case the effects taught to illustrate the sleights are from my professional repertoire.

Best,
Brad Burt
Brad Burt
David Fletcher
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First, you need cards. Costco (formerly Price Club) is the professionals' source for Bicycle cards.

Then - slow down, easy does it. One sleight at a time. One trick at a time. Karl Fulves' books (Dover Publications) are a great place to learn self-working tricks so you can work on presentation. Your audience doesn't give a hoot how you do it - they want to be ENTERTAINED!
You have to give it away to keep it.
Dave Egleston
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I'm not a video guy normally - I do own way too many - but I have to agree with Mr. Burt, his video courses are the best TEACHING videos available. There are enough Ammar clones in circulation. Brad Burt videos are all about the teaching (wish he would write some books), very verbose/descriptive, but the sleights are shown about a zillion times and he does it each time, not a replay of one sleight over and over but a sleight performed over and over.
By the way - I'm getting a new computer that will transfer VHS into DVD format. What is the thought on this as far as the producers of videos are concerned?

Back to the thread: Brad Burt videos - check'em out. Ammar tapes: lots of folks like them. If you've got some, you might as well use them. He's a great magician.
But if you can read and comprehend what you've read, try the books mentioned above

Dave
Peter Marucci
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Niels writes: "I think it's easier to learn when you see things on a video. All those book are in English and sometimes I don't understand it."

A very good point!

If English is not your first language, then videos are probably the way to go.

This stuff is difficult enough without making it even harder for yourself.

Niels, go with whatever you are comfortable with; there's no sense doing this if it's not fun!
The Londoner
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I suggest that you learn three tricks at a time, not one. I'm not alone in this as I've taken the advice from others. The reason for this is if you are asked to "show us some tricks," then you're stuck if you only know one trick and your spectator(s) will look at you as the guy who does a trick and not a magical entertainer. However, if you have three tricks at your fingertips then that's a nice little routine. If you show them one trick, you can bet they will want to see another (if they don't, then you've done it badly) and even another and there're your three tricks. They will probably want another after that if you've done them well, but you can leave it at this as you should always leave them wanting more.

Hope this helps,

John Fitzgerald.
Geoff Ray
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Dear Freak,
I have been doing card magic for a couple years now, and would personally recommend Royal Road To Card Magic (Book). It teaches all the basic sleights and is really useful. After this I would go to Jeff McBride's Art of Card Manipulation as this is another brilliant work - though it is more advanced.
Smile
Gerald
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secondbaseman,
Contact Richard Hatch at: http://www.magicbookshop.com/
(richard@magicbookshop.com)
He is the translator (German to English) of the "Card College" series and will know if Vol. 1 is still available in German. Besides, Richard is a great guy and knows his books inside & out - literally.

Regards,
Gerald
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