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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Barbecue Sauce Anyone? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

geemack
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Greg McNeil Peoria,Illinois
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Okay, the caption outside this category says, "A place to discuss things which have nothing to do with magic." So here's something not magic related, unless the magician in question happens to like a tasty, general purpose barbecue sauce. It's my own creation which I developed over many years. Try it. I hope you like it.

Quote:
Greg's Award Seeking Barbecue Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 medium clove garlic, minced
  • 1 small onion, finely diced
  • 1-1/2 cups ketchup
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 3 tablespoons vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon molasses
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon tobasco sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon liquid smoke flavoring
Heat a small sauce pan over medium heat then add the butter to the pan. Slightly brown the garlic in the butter. Add the onions and cook until they just become transparent. Reduce heat to very low and add the remaining ingredients. Stir well. Cover and simmer for an hour stirring occasionally. Makes one pint. Store in a clean jar in the refrigerator. Use as needed when cooking beef, pork, chicken, and other meats. About 1/3 cup of this sauce mixed into a pound of browned and drained ground beef makes great Sloppy Joes. Enjoy!
Partizan
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The only thing that makes it not your creation is the liquid smoke flavoring.

What is this item? Can it be recreated by constituant ingredients?
What is the taste of this smoke like?

Is the soy light or dark? I prefer Japanese soy!
"You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus."
- Mark Twain
geemack
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Greg McNeil Peoria,Illinois
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Quote:
On 2005-10-15 17:01, Partizan wrote...

The only thing that makes it not your creation is the liquid smoke flavoring.

What is this item? Can it be recreated by constituant ingredients?
What is the taste of this smoke like?

Is the soy light or dark? I prefer Japanese soy!

For all practical purposes liquid smoke is just a concentrate of the same smoke flavor that accumulates on a piece of meat when hung in a smoker or smoke house. The way I understand it, liquid smoke is produced by spraying a mist of water through the smoke exhaust that comes from burning hickory wood to create charcoal. The water is then collected, filtered, and bottled. Some brands of liquid smoke also contain small amounts of vinegar and/or molasses.

The concept is quite simple, and it might be a little tricky, but with a bit of inventiveness it could probably be made at home by cycling a drip or spray of water through the smoke coming from any standard meat smoker.

As for soy sauce, I usually use a dark when I make this recipe, but most any should work well. The whole recipe is sort of a foundation, and allows for a lot of flexibility. The proportions of the sugars, honey, brown sugar, and molasses, could be adjusted, or some amount substituted for white sugar. And of course there are many types of vinegars that could be used to create subtle differences from one batch to another. I use the term "tobasco" rather generically, but genuine Tobasco, Frank's, Louisiana, or anyone's favorite tangy hot sauce could be used instead. Even the ketchup for this sauce could be made from scratch, being mostly tomatoes, more vinegar, and more sugar.

Greg
Partizan
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I think I have some hickory in my shed, I will set up a smoker and smoke some charcoal (it absorbs well) and then use the charcoal as a subsitute.

What do you suggest I use it on and what is a good cooking method?

i.e. barbecue for sure and under the grill. Is it good for frying/stirfry or how about cold dip, how does it taste with potato chips?
"You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus."
- Mark Twain
Eric Rose
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Franklin, IN
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Geemack,

This one sounds pretty good. And heck, I'm not going to make my own Soy Sauce or churn my own butter, so I'll just use the store bought smoke, too.

Since you're in Peoria, have you ever snuck any of this stuff into Alexander's Steakhouse - if'n its even still open? Might be a great way to build an underground following among the grillers.

I'll report back when I've made the sauce.

Thanks!

By the way - great name on this stuff.
geemack
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Greg McNeil Peoria,Illinois
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Quote:
On 2005-10-15 18:15, Partizan wrote...

I think I have some hickory in my shed, I will set up a smoker and smoke some charcoal (it absorbs well) and then use the charcoal as a subsitute.

What do you suggest I use it on and what is a good cooking method?

i.e. barbecue for sure and under the grill. Is it good for frying/stirfry or how about cold dip, how does it taste with potato chips?
Usually I'll swab a thin coating of the sauce on some chicken breasts or a couple pork chops then cook them outdoors on the charcoal grill. When I turn the meat I'll swab some more sauce on the top side and finish cooking. If I'm baking a piece of meat in the oven, chicken or maybe ribs, I'll smear a good layer on the meat then bake it at 325° for around 35 minutes. Then I put the meat under the broiler for another 5 or 10 minutes until that sauce starts to get just a little bit caramelized and burnt on the surface.

It sure can be used as a cold sauce for dipping, or you could put some on a burger same as you might use ketchup. Sometimes I'll cook up a half pound or more of ground beef, break it up well while cooking, then drain off the fat and mix in about 1/3 cup of the barbecue sauce. Let it cook another few minutes and put some between the halves of a bun for Sloppy Joes, sometimes known as a loose meat sandwich.

Quote:
On 2005-10-15 18:48, Eric Rose wrote...

This one sounds pretty good. And heck, I'm not going to make my own Soy Sauce or churn my own butter, so I'll just use the store bought smoke, too.

Since you're in Peoria, have you ever snuck any of this stuff into Alexander's Steakhouse - if'n its even still open? Might be a great way to build an underground following among the grillers.
I haven't been to Alexander's for a few years now, but it's still there, and it's still the place in town to get a great steak dinner, especially if you're a fan of the cook-it-yourself type of steak restaurant. Can't say as I've ever snuck any home made barbecue sauce in there with me, but it's a thought for next time. Smile

Greg
rossmacrae
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You left out a good squirt of Sriracha Hot Sauce from the Asian aisle in most markets.
S2000magician
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Why would you need a squirt of Srirachi when the recipe already includes a teaspoon of Tabasco?

(This from someone who loves both Srirachi and Tabasco, and grows his own habaneros.)

The recipe sounds great, by the way.
Partizan
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Quote:
This one sounds pretty good. And heck, I'm not going to make my own Soy Sauce or churn my own butter, so I'll just use the store bought smoke, too.


In the UK we don't have some of the condiments that you have so we would have to try and make them.
"You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus."
- Mark Twain
Eric Rose
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Franklin, IN
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Partizan,

I'll send you a PM suggestion on this one...
daffydoug
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Yum!
The difficult must become easy, the easy beautiful and the beautiful magical.
Michael Baker
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Alexander's was alive and kickin' last March when I was up there (my old stomping grounds). The company that first started that steakhouse also operated a seafood restaurant across the river (PJ's). Behind their bar is where I first cut my eye teeth in professional magic.

Greg's quest for a great BBQ sauce goes back many years to a time when we were willing to take a shot at eating anything from Witch's Butter to roadkill deer. Ha! This is a sauce recipe that would rival some of the best Southern BBQ I have found around these parts! Two thumbs in it!!
~michael baker
The Magic Company
Partizan
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Greg, can you get Guinness?

If so then reduce some with the garlic, onion and butter. I would say about 250ml.
Then go on with your instructions using the guinnes mix as your base.
"You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus."
- Mark Twain
geemack
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Greg McNeil Peoria,Illinois
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Quote:
On 2005-10-18 01:54, Michael Baker wrote...

Greg's quest for a great BBQ sauce goes back many years to a time when we were willing to take a shot at eating anything from Witch's Butter to roadkill deer. Ha! This is a sauce recipe that would rival some of the best Southern BBQ I have found around these parts! Two thumbs in it!!

Thanks for the "aye" vote, Michael. And regarding the wild mushrooms and undomesticated meat products, we're still among the living, aren't we? How's that old saw go?... "That what don't kill ya only serves to make ya stronger." Smile

Quote:
On 2005-10-18 12:46, Partizan wrote...

Greg, can you get Guinness?

If so then reduce some with the garlic, onion and butter. I would say about 250ml.
Then go on with your instructions using the guinnes mix as your base.

Yes, sir, we have at least a few options in Guinness products including a rich dark Guinness Stout. Many people here use beer in a variety of recipes, and it seems to be especially appropriate for outdoor cooking. Your suggestion sounds easy and would be a tasty addition to the sauce.

Greg
Eric Rose
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Wouldn't reducing Guiness make it a solid immediately? It's thick enough to spread with a knife straight from the bottle!
Lee Darrow
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BOTTLE?! BOTTLE?! You bar-barian! Smile

For barbecue sauce only draught Guiness will do! That way the BAR part of BARbecue actually COMES from a BAR!! Not a liquor store or the 7/11!

Geez! What DO they teach these kids in school these days?! Smile Smile

Lee Darrow, C.H.
http://www.leedarrow.com
<BR>"Because NICE Matters!"
Eric Rose
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Ah, you've lived in Chicago too long. If we try to walk out of a bar with a mug around here we get picked up for public intox or open container. I guess you could always take a bucket and have them fill it up....

As to what they teach kids in school these days - according to my kids' teachers, they learn how to take standardized tests that prove they've learned all sorts of things that are on standardized tests. Quite useful, in a circular way. That way no child is left behind - you just pick them up on the next lap around.

e
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