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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » F/X » » Beware: Amplivox Portable Buddy Not What They Say! (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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todd75
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I am well aware that the sound needs to be above the audience. I put the unti on a waiter stand off to off side and have yet to have a problem with it. I also have a companion speaker so I now I have double the power for school gyms and other areas where the room is not the greatest.
Dan McLean Jr aka, Magic Roadie
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Toronto, Canada
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Quote:
A guide for sound systems is :-
1 watt per person in a good room (clean)
3 watt per person in a bad room (lots of drapes and soft furnishings)
The Portable Buddy is rated at 50 watts stereo (25 watts per side) so I wold not expect it to be able to handle a big room.

This rough rule-of-thumb sounds pretty reasonable to me, too. With 50 watts for 1000 people, the folks at the back may be able to hear something, but that something sure ain't 1st-quality sound reproduction.
Quote:
I put the unti on a waiter stand off to off side and have yet to have a problem with it.

This is a good strategy, as long as everyone in the audience can clearly see the entire speaker. If this is the case, then you're set! Otherwise, as Paula has offered, trying to send the sound through bodies is the same as trying to send sound through "a very effective baffle". If the entire audience can't clearly see the entire speaker, then the speaker needs to be higher in the air. Extra speakers and/or extra volume cannot overcome this "baffle" effect.

I'm glad to hear that your system's working well, Todd, and I hope what Paula & I have proposed will help even more!
Dan McLean Jr
todd75
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Sounds logical to me! Without a doubt, I know that the system by itself could not handle a 1000 kids in a school gym- there is just NO WAY! However, with a companion speaker and both of them up in the air and the kids on the floor, I think it can work. While I have yet to ever turn it up all the way, I think it is a great system that is very small and very lightweight for what I do.
Magic1
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Los Angeles
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Interested in hearing how the amplivox is playing for you years later
Magic1
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Los Angeles
391 Posts

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I have had pretty good experiences with Amplivox. Their customer service is a little "family style" meaning- you might have to keep calling and pestering them a little bit, but when you do get them, they will probably replace and fix anything that's going wrong to your heart's content. They care deeply about their product- they're just a little disorganized and overwhelmed.

I've used mine for about 10 years and it is great! They've really gone the extra mile to service my needs. I recommend Amplivox- but with the warning that you may need to call a few times and stay on them to get your issue handled- but they really will fix it.
sethb
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The Jersey Shore
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In my experience, the "1 watt per person" rule is a good place to start, with a few caveats.

First, this is a good estimate under optimum or good conditions. But if you are working outside or in a room with lots of carpets and drapes, then 1-1/2 or 2 watts per person is more like it, in my experience. While you don't want to buy (or lug around) more PA than you need, it's probably also a good idea to have a little extra horsepower in reserve for a tough situation.

When you are calculating your wattage needs, also remember that many sound systems are advertised as "50 watts" in the big print. Then when you get to the small print, it will explain that this number is "peak power," and that the system is actually just 30 watts RMS. I'm not sure exactly what "RMS" stands for, but it is the "real world" output and not just what you can get for brief bursts.

Or a system may claim that it's 50 watts, and then the small print explains that it's "25 watts per channel," so it's really just a 25-watt system. And while adding an extra unpowered speaker to an existing system may improve the sound coverage, it doesn't increase the existing wattage; in fact, I think it probably decreases the power going to each speaker, because they must now share the same amp. SETH
"Watch the Professor!!" -- Al Flosso (1895-1976)
"The better you are, the closer they watch" -- Darwin Ortiz, STRONG MAGIC
Magic1
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SethB, I would agree- this thing works great for groups of 50. Can go up to 100, but probably starts to strain a bit around there. It has been a great unit for me.
Thanks
chill
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colorado, usa
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A good guess at "rms" power is 71% of peak power. "rms" is root means squared, the actual power avail. in a sine wave. or something like that....
bob
I spent most of my money on magic and women, the rest i just wasted
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