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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » Spelling of "Sleight" (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

AmazingA
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Question: our type of "Sleight" is spelled like that, correct? We would be wrong to refer to sleight of hand spelled with simply "slight", correct?

Thanks in advance,
cfrye
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Correct.
AmazingA
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Thank you much.
Bill Palmer
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If you said "slight" of hand, it would mean one of three things.
1) you have small hands
2) you are missing one or more fingers
3) you have insulted someone with your hand.

Check out my post in the Buffet about spelling.

It's like "straitjacket" and "straightjacket."

A "straitjacket" is what you escape from. A "straightjacket" would be something worn by a heterosexual.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

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AmazingA
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Funny...But true! Thanks!
landon
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Ya, I've always been confused why so many people say slight instead of sleight. Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't Erdnase say slight in his book? I guess both ways are right?
Michael Baker
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Quote:
On 2006-01-05 18:32, landon wrote:
Ya, I've always been confused why so many people say slight instead of sleight. Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't Erdnase say slight in his book?


They would have been allowed to do that in the parlour. (tongue firmly planted)
~michael baker
The Magic Company
saheer
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Quote:
On 2005-12-31 12:46, Bill Palmer wrote:
* * *
It's like "straitjacket" and "straightjacket."

A "straitjacket" is what you escape from. A "straightjacket" would be something worn by a heterosexual.



But you still can't escape its homophonic qualities . . . .


: b
"Because, without beer, things do not seem to go as well"

1902 diary of Brother Epp, Capuchin monk from Munjor,
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Bill Palmer
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Quote:
On 2006-01-05 18:32, landon wrote:
Ya, I've always been confused why so many people say slight instead of sleight. Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't Erdnase say slight in his book? I guess both ways are right?


Yes, he does, but not consistently.

For example, in the introduction he says: "Part second describes the sleights employed in conjuring...." In this context, the word means a secret move.

When he discusses a certain kind of gimmick, he says "This results in a slight hump...." In this case, "slight" means small, tiny or thin.

In the first half of the book, he spells the word for a secret move as "sleight."

Then in the part on legerdemain, he misspells it as "slight." This may be one reason that some scholars have felt that someone besides the author of the first half wrote the second half. Hugard was an early suspect, but he doesn't misspell sleight.

Each way is correct in the proper context, but the spellings are not interchangeable. The two words have entirely different meanings.

It's like "there" which tells a location and "their" which means belonging to them.

The only reasons I can figure that magicians don't catch on to this is that
1) they don't care,
2) they are lazy or
3) they are stubborn.

Why anyone would not learn to spell the names of the tools of their craft correctly is beyond me. To me, it shows a lack of attention to detail.

One thing to bear in mind is that Erdnase, whoever he was, probably was not a professional writer. He may have been a mining engineer. He most certainly was a gambler. It is very doubtful that he had an advanced degree in English. So he certainly would not be considered an authority on spelling.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
rikbrooks
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Sleight comes from the Norse word, sloegth (sorry linguists, my keyboard doesn't have that character that the Norse used where they jammed the o and the e together). Sloegth means 'cunning'. Slaegth itself comes from another Norse word, sloegr which means 'sly'.

While this is itself descriptive, Merriam Webster has seen fit to include 'Sleight of Hand' in its dictionary.

1 a : a conjuring trick requiring manual dexterity b : a cleverly executed trick or deception
2 a : skill and dexterity in conjuring tricks b : adroitness in deception

The word is pronounced "slight" as in small
Bill Palmer
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Which one? There are over two dozen different Merriam-Webster dictionaries.

I prefer the one commonly called "Webster's Second," which is the Webster's New International Dictionary, Second Edition, Unabridged. I also use Webster's Third, which is the Third Edition of the same work. Both of these are published by Merriam-Webster. There are also Collegiate editions, and many others.

The "real" source, though is the Oxford English Dictionary. I've got the compact edition with all the supplements. This traces the development of the words through usage. I have been looking for the OED on CD for a while. It used to be available bundled with a big software pack.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
Richard Evans
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Hi Bill,

Is this of interest to you? It's from the Oxford University Press:
http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/?v......95222172

They also do a monthly on-line subscription (more expensive)
http://www.oed.com/

Best

Richard
I have six locks on my door all in a row. When I go out, I only lock every other one. I figure no matter how long somebody stands there picking the locks, they are always locking three. Elayne Boosler
Bill Palmer
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Thanks!!!! I have a question into their staff about it now. I'll probably purchase it.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
joseph
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Just remember.... I before e, except after c..... Smile ....
"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler." (Einstein)...
Bill Palmer
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Or as the Egyptians said "Horse before cow, except after sow."
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
Richard Evans
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Quote:
On 2006-01-06 23:36, Bill Palmer wrote:
Or as the Egyptians said "Horse before cow, except after sow."


Very good Smile
I have six locks on my door all in a row. When I go out, I only lock every other one. I figure no matter how long somebody stands there picking the locks, they are always locking three. Elayne Boosler
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