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benlewis2004
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Ok,

I have no audio equipment experience so I'll need serious help.

Don't ask why, but I used to play the electric guitar and would like to use the amp for a wirelss microphone system.

Im sure you know what inputs are accepted into these amps. but could you tell me EXACTLY what I need to do this including transmitters, receivers, microphones, everything.


I appreciate any help.
Regan
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Ben,

I think we really need to know exactly what type of amp you have before I make an. What type of inputs does your amp have. I'm sure it has a 1/4" phone jack for instrument(s), but does it have a XLR mic input also. Does it have tube or solid state circuitry? If it a tube amp I would not recommend that you use it with a microphone.

Regan
Mister Mystery
benlewis2004
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It's in the loft at the moment but from what I can remember it said microphone above on input (I think) but it looked the same as the other input.
muzicman
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LaCenter, Wa
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Regan, I'm ALMOST positive it's not a 1/4" phone jack, but then again I could be wrong LOL.

Using a guitar amp for a PA is done all the time. Most quality MIC's have the 1/4" equipment plug which is just like your guitar cord. If your MIC is XLR, you can purchase an XLR to 1/4" plug cable. Higher end MIC's have XLR connectors and you just need to buy the right cable (either XLR or 1/4" depending on your amp input).

I play guitar and have amps galore. (that means A LOT of em). I used an AMP one time and swore never again. It was a pain for me as I also use music and I had to premix the music with the mic as my amp would only accept 1 input. I used my Fostex cassette mini studio which has 4 1/4" inputs and RCA jacks (right and left) outputs. I had to get a Y RCA jack to a single mono 1/4 jack adapter. If you think it sounds confusing, it was! The quality was less than desirable as the guitar amp just didn't have the full frequency spectrum for my voice and my music. I could be heard...but I'm a stickler for quality. I believe anything less than perfect is a distraction to the audience and they deserve the best.

For my smaller venues, I use a 500 watt Sony Shelf system (w/sub). It has its own mixer onboard for my wireless mic. The EQ settings and special effects allow me to dial it in no matter where I set it up. It also has 4 speakers so I can spread them out to present a really WIDE sound. It was cheaper than an amp!
benlewis2004
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Could anyone explain exactly what I need lol, I want to use a wireless mic (the type that goes round your head)
Regan
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I play guitar also. Yeah, you can plug a high impedence microphone into a tube guitar amp that is equipped with a 1/4" phone jack, but I would not recommend it. My experience tells me it is going to be noisy and the sound quality will not be good.

Some of the newer, solid state guitar amps may have a microphone input. I am not very up-to-date with the latest electic guitar amps out there. I have an old Fender Blackface Vibrolux. I have owned many through the years. My largest was a Marshall JCM 900 series 100 watt head with 2two, 4 x 12 cabinets. That baby stood seven feet tall!

I know some of the acoustic guitar amps do have a mic input. However, I tried some of those out and wasn't very happy with the sound. I ended up buying a small PA system. This was for my music gigs, not magic. I wanted something small for restaraunts and smaller venues. My acoustic guitar sounded good through most of them, but vocals did not. Now some of the larger ones might work better, I don't know.

Anyway, Ben said he played electric guitar, so I assumed he had an electric guitar amp. If it is a tube amp, unless things have changed recently, I would not recommend plugging a microphone into it and using it for voice amplification.

Regan
Mister Mystery
benlewis2004
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Don't worry it is a more close-up type thing, but could anyone tell me exactly what I need lol?
MikeDes
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You need a microphone that plugs into a transmitter (on your belt). You need a receiver (for the transmitter). You connect the receiver to your Amp. The type of cable you need depends on the the output jack on your receiver and and your AMP. Usually they will either be XLR (3 pins) or a quarter inch jack.

Of course your AMP and transmitter have to be plugged into an electrical socket unless they run off batteries.

Good luck.

Mike
Dan McLean Jr aka, Magic Roadie
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Toronto, Canada
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Ben,
As said by a few helpful gents (you've gotten a lot of support in the past 4 hours!), we can't tell you "exactly" because we don't know anything about your guitar amp except that you can plug a guitar into it, and we don't know anyting about the connectors on the wireless you want to use. So far, you've asked us to get you from Chicago to Miami, but we don't know if you want to drive or fly, what day you want to leave or arrive, or whether it's winter or summer!

If you can, use a wireless with an output jack that looks the same as a guitar jack, and plug it into your amp using a short guitar cable.

If the wireless doesn't have a guitar-style output jack, then give us every possible detail about both pieces, and we'll try to help.
Dan McLean Jr
www.MagicRoadie.com
"Taking the mystery out of stage technology!"
David Bilan
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Clarksville, TN
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Ben,

Try this site: http://www.mediacollege.com/ It shows XLR connectors, phono jacks, talks about microphones and covers many areas of audio you may not even care about.

Then look at your equipment and see what you own. Keep in mind you may be asking a pig to fly, depending on your gear at home.

We can offer a lot of suggestions, but not knowing your budget and projected use creates problems.

You say you want to use it for close-up. how many poeple? Why do you need amplification? Will you be mixing music? Are you trying to do this alone, or will you have a sound tech?

Good luck.
David
Yes, I am a magician. No I did not make my hare (hair) disappear... it just took early retirement.
benlewis2004
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Thanks
Face
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I think you should turn to a local music shop to get Exact info and help from real pros.
silverking
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Actually Dan and Regan ARE real pros, and the information they provided is completely accurate.
Dynamike
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Eternal Order
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Check out: http://shure.com/

Shure is the #1 manufacture of microphones. Purchase a UHF wireless headworn one because you will be able to use both hands. Don't let $1000 prices fool you. You will be able to find a good headworn microphone, transmitter and receiver for under $500.00. Good luck.

Dynamike
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