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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The clothes we wear » » Your looks... How important is it to your Magic? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Pakar Ilusi
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Nor should you be trying to be Blaine, Scott!

"Better that you are a first rate version of yourself than a second-rate version of someone else." -Someone wiser than me-

Good replies everyone!
Smile

Smile
"Dreams aren't a matter of Chance but a matter of Choice." -DC-
Bob Sanders
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The Costume is a Walking Credential

Dressing the role is most definitely part of the role. I am fortunate that my hometown, Montgomery, Alabama, is also the only location of the Shakespeare Festival with its own Post Office, Shakespeare Station. When I was a university professor, I made it a point to take my Marketing students to see the operation of the Shakespeare Festival off stage. They we constantly amazed to learn that the costume manufacturing function was larger than the part of the facility where the plays were performed. It made a point I could never sell in the classroom. The actor is the most important part of the stage. And the actor's costume is the most available information about the actor's role.

Zoom cameras are used on television but not in real live productions. The viewer sees the whole picture all the time. The struggle for meaningful attention needs all the help it can get. Note that in professional showmanship we change the contents of the costume (the actor) more frequently than the costume. The costume has more job security than the actor for a very good reason. The delivery of its lines is more reliable. Costumes add certainty and continuity to the production. The costume is a walking credential.

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
The Amazed Wiz
Bob Sanders

Magic By Sander / The Amazed Wiz

AmazedWiz@Yahoo.com http://www.magicbysander.com/
hackmonkey
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Sorry for the late reply guys I forgot about this thread. Peter thanks for the kind words, I tried a few different lens types, white-out (all white eyes, just black pupils), cats eyes etc.. Black is subtle enough to be spooky but not obviously 'fake', and just having just one gives the 'David Bowie effect' and just seemed to work better having two made me look like a vampire.

Pakar I do work out somewhat enough that my arms look good in a tank top, but I am no Calvin Klein underwear model. If you body is in good shape your cloths look better on you. As for keeping up with fashion, I find black and white never go out of fashion. Black shirts, white T-shirts and a combination of both are good. A 'fitted' white T-shirt can look very smart when combined with black trousers and shoes. I rarely wear a suite except when doing weddings for obvious reasons. But your clothes should always be well ironed and clean and well as your hands/nails/hair.

Smile
Look behind you...on your left...thats the real world.



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DarryltheWizard
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I think that every performer is a product of the people he has met in the past. In my case , I met Liberace in my teen years and was strongly influenced by his fantastic showmanship and his wonderful outfits. I still dress in black with a flame- patterned sequined vest( I can't afford the diamond buttons yet!) People not only remember me for my clothes , but I physically ressemble Robin Williams and Joe Pesci(I'm not good spelling Italian names, sorry Peter.) Kids for some uncanny reason feel that they've met me before. In fact , I've even signed an autograph once in a mall.) I'm not just another pretty face, but one with that leaves the audience with a memorable impression. I also change during the show into a card-sequined vest, and into a striped red and white jacket for my Miser's dream. During my adult shows ,I look at the rings of some of the ladies in the audience and say, " My stone isn't quite a big, but I didn't have to do anything to get it!" I stole that line from Lee himself.
Darryl the Flashy Wizard
DarryltheWizard
"Life without mystery is like a candle
with a snuffed out flame." Albert Einstein
Pakar Ilusi
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Thanks for all the replies!

Agreed, Hackmonkey, clothes do look better on us when we're in shape.

I've learnt lots here. Thanks, everyone!
"Dreams aren't a matter of Chance but a matter of Choice." -DC-
The Wicked Mr. Grey
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I only perform on stage, and I give a lot of thought as to what I wear and what my assistants will wear. I take into consideration whether I need to be wearing a certain type or material in order to do certain types of effects and so on.

For example, I just had a show and used a little black art. For that reason I wore black pants and a white sweater, choosing to hide the white sweater rather than to be wearing all black on a black stage.

Also take into account, if you're doing close-up, what types of tricks you will be doing. I mean, don't use ITR while wearing a white shirt. Wear a black shirt. And you'll see that you can get away with doing ITR even in relative sunlight (read: you don't have to wait for low light conditions but can perform in pre-dusk type of light) as long as the thread is 'against' your body.

In the show that I'm currently putting together for a tour of Canada, I'll be wearing a white pair of pants, a white T-shirt and then a white trench coat. The coat is tailor made for a look that I wanted. I basically took the coat that Neo wears in the Matrix Reloaded, had it made all in white but also designed it so that it would stay fairly close to my body even though the front is completely open (unlike in the movie where his coat is done up). This costume really works for me and whenever I get into it to rehearse I get this feeling as if I really am a real magician (read: real magic not...'our' magic), or angel (which is kind of what I'm supposed to be in the show).

I find that if you get this feeling from wearing the clothes, then your performance actually improves. At least it did in my experience.

Dorian Grey
What you have seen this evening was real, though it may have nothing to do with reality.



A Life Among Secrets
Angela
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Pakar-
I agree with a lot of the first posts on here that the clothes you wear should be based on your character. It's all about creating an image for yourself. In my business, I have seen a ton of people dishing out big bucks to image consultants. I personally think that this is a big waste of money. The main point is just to look good and feel comfortable. Smile
alextsui
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Wow, this is a really long thread. I guess this topic must really hit a nerve with magicians.

Basically, I agree with the comments that you have to look clean, neat and smell nice with trim fingernails. These are the little things that adds up to a big impression.

As for the style/ fashion of clothing to wear for doing magic, it's interesting to note that magicians worldwide seem to be forever struggling with this issue with lots of different viewpoints.

I don't perform as any character (for example, a clown). I perform routines as myself and I must admit I still ask myself sometimes whether I'm overdressed or underdressed for my shows.

It's always good to keep fit and exercise (for health reasons). However, I don't think you should go out of the way and work out for your shows. Just work with what you have.

Instead of trying to change your body to fit your routines, why not customize your routines to fit your body shape and personality? By the way, this is much easier.

For example, if you're plump and have a round chubby face, it might not be a good idea to do a romantic illusion-dance routine. A comedic routine might complement you better. Please don't be offended if you're plump with a round chubby face. Smile I'm just illustrating the point that you should select routines and tricks to fit you.

Magical Regards,
Alex Tsui
Dizzy
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For those of you who saw the 'greastest magic tricks' series (I can't remeber which one it was) there was a comment made by a British, supposedly 'comic magician' towards a female illusionist. Yes this girl really was beatiful with a stunning figure but her sarcastic comment of "its like Barbi does magic" hasn't helped young female magicians like myself to be taken seriously. Sometimes good looks goes against you.
I find it hard to get the males in my audience to taken me seriously, I normally have to challenge them to a few poker hands on the basis that if I win then they have to watch me perform.
If I'm honest then
Peter Marucci
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Dizzy writes: "Sometimes good looks goes against you."

Yes, I know what you mean; I'm tired of being looked on as just a sex symbol!

ROTFL! Smile
Dr_Stephen_Midnight
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As Jay Marshall said, "Look healthy and energetic."

Steve
Dr. Lao: "Do you know what wisdom is?"
Mike: "No."
Dr. Lao: "Wise answer."
RBerteig
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I read once that the goal was to always be recognizably "the magician". I.e., when you walk into the room cold, people should know (but possibly without knowing why the know) that you are there to perform. (I may be taking T. A. Waters out of context here, but it really does apply!)

I take that to mean that my costume(s) can and should reflect the role I am playing. It also means that what I wear "off stage" should be just a bit different from everyone else. I achieve this mostly by dressing neatly, but with some care to avoid whatever is in fashion.

I do this in my day job as a consultant. I find that if I walk in to a client's site dressed exactly to their dress code, I am treated just like one of their own employees and hence don't get heard. If I make a point of dressing differently (colored shirts, never a suit and tie) then I don't fit in, and my advice is heard. This phenomenon is well known in the consulting field, and is a variation of costuming to suit the role. Here the role is as consultant not employee.

The hygene advice should go without saying, but probably bears seconding as well.

As for physique, "All things in moderation, including moderation" has been my motto for a long time. Health is important. So is happiness. Walk a mile or two occasionally. Remember to wander around in that big room with the high ceilings, unpredicatable weather, and the occasional leak overhead and argue with the (tamer sorts of) wildlife occasionaly.

Above all, know the role you play, and play it completely.
Ross Berteig
Wizards in my Parlor
Pakar Ilusi
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Thanks again for all the advice... Smile
"Dreams aren't a matter of Chance but a matter of Choice." -DC-
Hoelderlin
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Quote:
On 2003-01-03 18:28, Deal A Deuce wrote:
Be yourself.


Or, at least, not less than what you are Smile
Hölderlin (Massimo Manca) - Circolo Amici della Magia - Turin - Italy.
Big Daddy Cool
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Quote:
On 2002-12-29 17:38, Scott F. Guinn wrote:
I find that my looks can actually be detrimental to my magic. I am so pretty, people have a hard time concentrating on what I am saying and doing! Smile


Scott, Big Daddy Cool has the same problem!

Actually, looks and physical appearance are pretty important. I'm a big guy and have some socially accepted stereotypes to over come. Both in and out of costume.

Out of costume, anytime I go out in public I dress as a successful, busy, show biz businessman. I dress casual sharp, or business casual and try to stay current with hip fashions. I want potential clients and employees to have confidence in me and feel good about doing business with me. I do work out and excercise and am trying to get back to college weight. I've lost nearly 100 lbs in 2 years. As I've slimmed down, my business has expanded.

On stage Big Daddy must evoke a certain response. I spent the money to buy the best quality clothes and make-up. In college, I trained how to apply theatrical make-up, so I look good.

Appearance makes a huge difference!
Swing hard, swing often, and we'll catch ya on the Flip-Side!
John Pyka
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DrBob
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Someone once gave this advice about how to dress to do magic: "always dress as if you have someplace even more important to be after you've completed the show you're at"
dpe666
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Quote:
On 2004-08-05 09:19, Hoelderlin wrote:
Quote:
On 2003-01-03 18:28, Deal A Deuce wrote:
Be yourself.


Or, at least, not less than what you are Smile


But what if you are a total jerk? Smile
Laughing Otter
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Quote:
We're not talking high fashion here; just simple common sense; a shower, clean clothes, deodorant, clean fingernails, that sort of thing goes a long way. So how come so many wannabes overlook that feature? They spend more time cleaning their sponge rabbits than their bodies!


This kind of thing is so common that Michael Finney felt the need to spend about five minutes on it when he lectured at Abbott's recently. Breath was something else he felt compelled to mention.

What a sad, sad thing it is that ordinary, everyday people require prompting about such things. The need to remind *performing entertainers* is nothing short of tragic.
Mike Wild
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The question is easily bounced back to the asker, "How important are looks to you regarding:

1. A hostess or waiter/waitress

2. A business associate that you must entrust with money.

3. A teacher or mentor to whom you look for direction

4. A singer or musician that you've hired for a function.

We, as performers, fill all or some of these positions at one time or another, so how important is your look?

My looks are pretty **** important to my overall act. If I didn't have the tattoos and the long hair, and the wild shirts, I'd have to work 300% harder to establish who I am when it's time for me to make things vanish.

Mike
<><>< SunDragon Magic ><><>

"Question Reality... Create Illusion"
Peter Marucci
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WildStone makes a good, valid, and very important point in his post.

When you appear in public as a performer, what you wear and what you look like only reflects on you for a short time; but your character reflects on the person who hired you for a very long time!

If you have ANY respect at all for your clients, you will want to put them in the best possible light. Therefore, you should dress, look, and act in character. And, whether your character is in a tuxedo, a clown outfit, or tatoos and chains, cleanliness and quality should always be at the forefront -- for the reasons expressed above!
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