The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Jolly Roger's Marketing Strategies......Finally!! (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6~7~8~9 [Next]
Futureal
View Profile
Inner circle
1562 Posts

Profile of Futureal
Not wanting to be incendiary, but the ring links/unlinks in that video at 47 seconds, 56 seconds, and 1:11 aren't good enough, IMO. I didn't watch the rest of the routine.

Need to be smoother; spend an evening in front of the mirror with it.
Jolly Roger
View Profile
V.I.P.
Sedona, Arizona
1645 Posts

Profile of Jolly Roger
Futureal,
You really should not give up at 1:11...go the full 3 minutes. I am just back from a birthday party, and a little girl was really upset with my 2.09 move that she started crying. Fortunately it was one of those rare parties I do when grown-ups were present, so Mummy was able to take her out of the room while she recovered!!
calamari
View Profile
Elite user
The San Francisco Bay Area
429 Posts

Profile of calamari
Posting parts of your act here was very brave, JR. Everyone knows magicians are harsh critics, and since you have opened yourself up to it, well, I just hope you (I can already tell you do) have a pretty thick skin... Also remember that everyone has an opinion here and will give it freely.
I don't do the Linking Rings because I think it has to be done brilliantly to look magical. An average Linking Ring routine (in my opinion) will always look, well, average. I watched Jonathan Neal Brown do his 2-Ring routine in Oakland, CA at the OMC about 10 years ago and threw my rings away. I will say if anyone doing the Linking Rings thinks it's easy, then they're not doing them justice.
Rich
"I came, I saw, SHE conquered." (The original Latin seems to have been garbled.)
Jolly Roger
View Profile
V.I.P.
Sedona, Arizona
1645 Posts

Profile of Jolly Roger
"I think it has to be done brilliantly to look magical."


Rich...are you, for a moment, suggesting I am not doing it brilliantly?
Roger
calamari
View Profile
Elite user
The San Francisco Bay Area
429 Posts

Profile of calamari
JR,
I don't think it is brilliant, but in fairness, I went to watch it again and, well, it's certainly not the worst I have ever seen. In fact, aside from a few minor things, I thought it was really quite good. And it was obvious your audience loved it, so there you go. I also saw the Professor doing the rings and, well, I think there are a lot of people who do it a lot better than him, and their routines are better. IMHO.
Rich
"I came, I saw, SHE conquered." (The original Latin seems to have been garbled.)
Jolly Roger
View Profile
V.I.P.
Sedona, Arizona
1645 Posts

Profile of Jolly Roger
Do not take yourself too seriously! One of the things I have noticed since joining the Café is that everyone takes themselves way too seriously. It amazes me. I wake up every morning, smell the roses, breath the refreshing autumn air, and live every wonderful moment of life to the fullest! I am blessed that I have the gift to make thousands of children around the planet happy, and I even get paid well above the national average for doing this. Why on earth should I complain?
I hear the anger, frustration, jealousy, and fear going on around me.......and I am a little sad..........although, I chuckle to myself at the same time. Why do I chuckle? Because I see the bigger picture. I have had my fair share of criticism on the Café (to put it mildly!!). Do I listen to it? Sure...if it is constructive. Do I let it get to me if it is negative? Never!! Does it bother me if there are private war rooms on other blogs who decide to make an organised attack on me? Of course not!! That is their problem, not mine!

To summarise......Life is about living. Those of us who make a living out of entertaining children are so very blessed. Have fun, ignore negativity, believe in yourself, and remember to never grow up like the muggles do. Stay silly, yet magical!! I will be adding more shortly about my "fear" comments.
NJJ
View Profile
Inner circle
6439 Posts

Profile of NJJ
I'm sure we all appreciate your metaphysical advice, but since I have my fair share of bumper stickers, fridge magnets, and O magazine, I might just stick to your thoughts on marketing...

What sort of marketing advice and ideas were you going offer?
Jolly Roger
View Profile
V.I.P.
Sedona, Arizona
1645 Posts

Profile of Jolly Roger
Nicholas,
I will offer my marketing advice very shortly. However, today is November 5th... Guy Fawkes Day. This is the most exciting day of the year for many children in England......bigger than Halloween!! Americans know nothing about this strange event, so right now, I am busy educating them over here in the Arizona Desert. Do you celebrate this in Australia? If any Americans on this forum do not have a clue what I am talking about, feel free to ask me or any other Brits out there in cyberspace!!
Jolly Roger
View Profile
V.I.P.
Sedona, Arizona
1645 Posts

Profile of Jolly Roger
Here is a brief History.........but just so you know tonight, all over England, Children are setting fire to bonfires and letting off fireworks to celebrate the following event. It is political correctness gone to H in a handbag!!! I love it!! They also burn a effigy of Guy on the bonfire.... Great, especially on the day Saddam Hussein has been sentenced to hang!!!

In 1605, thirteen young men planned to blow up the Houses of Parliament. Among them was Guy Fawkes, Britain's most notorious traitor.

After Queen Elizabeth I died in 1603, English Catholics who had been persecuted under her rule had hoped that her successor, James I, would be more tolerant of their religion. James I had, after all, had a Catholic mother. Unfortunately, James did not turn out to be more tolerant than Elizabeth, and a number of young men, 13 to be exact, decided that violent action was the answer.

A small group took shape, under the leadership of Robert Catesby. Catesby felt that violent action was warranted. Indeed, the thing to do was to blow up the Houses of Parliament. In doing so, they would kill the King, maybe even the Prince of Wales, and the Members of Parliament who were making life difficult for the Catholics. Today, these conspirators would be known as extremists, or terrorists.

To carry out their plan, the conspirators got hold of 36 barrels of gunpowder - and stored them in a cellar, just under the House of Lords.

But as the group worked on the plot, it became clear that innocent people would be hurt or killed in the attack, including some people who even fought for more rights for Catholics. Some of the plotters started having second thoughts. One of the group members even sent an anonymous letter warning his friend, Lord Monteagle, to stay away from the Parliament on November 5th. Was the letter real?

The warning letter reached the King, and the King's forces made plans to stop the conspirators.

Guy Fawkes, who was in the cellar of the parliament with the 36 barrels of gunpowder when the authorities stormed it in the early hours of November 5th, was caught, tortured, and executed.

It's unclear if the conspirators would ever have been able to pull off their plan to blow up the Parliament, even if they had not been betrayed. Some have suggested that the gunpowder itself was so old as to be useless. Since Guy Fawkes and the other conspirators got caught before trying to ignite the powder, we'll never know for certain.

Even for the period which was notoriously unstable, the Gunpowder Plot struck a very profound chord for the people of England. In fact, even today, the reigning monarch only enters the Parliament once a year, on what is called "the State Opening of Parliament". Prior to the Opening, and according to custom, the Yeomen of the Guard search the cellars of the Palace of Westminster. Nowadays, the Queen and Parliament still observe this tradition.

On the very night that the Gunpowder Plot was foiled, on November 5th, 1605, bonfires were set alight to celebrate the safety of the King. Since then, November 5th has become known as Bonfire Night. The event is commemorated every year with fireworks and burning effigies of Guy Fawkes on a bonfire.

Some of the English have been known to wonder, in a tongue in cheek kind of way, whether they are celebrating Fawkes' execution or honoring his attempt to do away with the government.
Brian Lehr
View Profile
Inner circle
Edmonton, Canada
1600 Posts

Profile of Brian Lehr
Quote:
On 2006-11-05 22:50, jolly roger wrote:
However, today is November 5th... Guy Fawkes Day.


Probably a bit off topic, but when I was growing up in my Canadian province of Newfoundland, every Nov. 5 we had a big event called "Bon Fire Night". We'd spend months collecting old trees that had fallen, worn out car tires, any kind of discarded wood, etc. in preparation for this night. We'd then have a big party around the fire roasting apples, potatoes, marshmallows, etc.

It was only as an adult that I discovered the significance of this day. The reason Newfoundland was the only province in Canada (that I'm aware of) that practiced this (and still do in some parts) is because Newfoundland did not become a province of Canada until 1949. Before that, we were a colony of ... you guessed it, Great Britain! Smile That's why, even today, much of the language and many customs have their origins in England.

Brian

PS - Roger, do they still have Mummers in England during the week following Christmas?

PSS - Newfoundland joined Canada on April 1st (April Fools Day). Some Newfoundlanders still think it was a big joke! Smile
Jolly Roger
View Profile
V.I.P.
Sedona, Arizona
1645 Posts

Profile of Jolly Roger
Interesting, Brian. I realise this thread is getting somewhat off topic, but your thread inspired me to do some research on Mummers. I would be interested to hear from fellow Brits if they know of any Mummers plays or parades that still take place. Of course, as the British will know, this is the traditional opening of the Pantomime season...the greatest of all Christmas entertainment for children! I might start a new thread to discuss this, as Americans know nothing about it...and it really is something we can all learn so much from when it comes to entertaining children. Oh, no, it isn't!!! Oh, yes, it is!!............

Calverton Plough Play, a Plough Monday play performed in Calverton village, Nottinghamshire. Mummers' and guisers' plays were formerly performed throughout most of Great Britain and Ireland, as well as in other English-speaking parts of the world including Newfoundland and Saint Kitts and Nevis. In England, there are a few surviving traditional teams, but there have been many revivals, often associated nowadays with Morris dance and Sword dance groups. Mummers and guisers can be traced back at least to the middle ages, though when the term "mummer" appears in ancient manuscripts, it is rarely clear what sort of performance was involved. A key element was visiting people in disguise at Christmas. At one time, in the royal courts, special allegorical plays were written for the mummers each year - for instance at the court of Edward III, as shown in a 14th Century manuscript, now in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. However, apart from being in rhyme, these plays were nothing like the current traditional plays, whose documented history only goes back as far as the mid-18th century.

Although usually broadly comic performances, the plays seem to be based on underlying themes of duality and resurrection, and generally involve a battle between two or more characters, perhaps representing good against evil. Usually, they feature a doctor who has a magic potion which is able to resuscitate a slain character.

In mummers’ plays, the central incident is the killing and restoring to life of one of the characters. First, the characters are introduced in a series of short speeches in which each personage has his own introductory announcement; then comes the drama. The principal characters, presented in a wide variety of manner and style, are a Hero, his chief opponent, and a quack Doctor; the defining feature of mumming plays is the Doctor, and the main purpose of the fight is to provide him with a patient to cure. The hero sometimes kills, and sometimes is killed, by his opponent; in either case, the doctor comes to restore the dead man to life.

The name of the hero is most commonly Saint George, King George, or Prince George. His principal opponents are the Turkish Knight (in southern England and Turkish Champion in Ireland) or a valiant soldier named Slasher (elsewhere). Other characters include: Old Father Christmas (who introduces some plays), Beelzebub, Little Devil Doubt (who demands money from the audience), Robin Hood (an alternative hero in the Cotswolds), Galoshin (a hero in Scotland), etc. Despite the frequent presence of Saint George, the Dragon rarely appears in these plays; the few instances can all be traced back to a Cornish script published by William Sandys in 1833. Although there are earlier hints, the earliest full version of the text is the Revesby 1779 play. The town of Revesby is in Lincolnshire.

Occasionally, the performers will wear face-obscuring hats or other kinds of headgear, which create the impression of being masked. More often, mummers' faces are blackened or painted red by way of disguise. Many mummers and guisers, however, have no facial disguise at all.

So there you have it!
harris
View Profile
Inner circle
Harris Deutsch
8663 Posts

Profile of harris
Happy Monday, or whenever you read this post.

In honor of "Rule 62", I try to take myself lightly while taking magic sewiously.

I also take comedy sewiously. I am looking forward (next week) to my quarterly discussion with middle school drama students on the elements of comedy. (6 class rooms over 2 days)

Being aware of other markets is important to this nearly normal guy. Markets that I can fit in successfully that is. The first time I heard about working in schools (other than school assembly programs) was after one of my RenFest programs. A middle school English teacher in a town 3 hours west asked me to apply for a artist in residence. Over the years, I have learned the importance of not trying to fill all requests; just ones I can have the skills and interest. On-site marketing helps as well as .....

Harris
Harris Deutsch aka dr laugh
drlaugh4u@gmail.com
music, magic and marvelous toys
http://magician.org/member/drlaugh4u
The Great Stevini
View Profile
Regular user
145 Posts

Profile of The Great Stevini
Quote:
On 2006-11-06 10:38, jolly roger wrote:
Interesting, Brian. I realise this thread is getting somewhat off topic, but your thread inspired me to do some research on Mummers. I would be interested to hear from fellow Brits if they know of any Mummers plays or parades that still take place. Of course, as the British will know, this is the traditional opening of the Pantomime season...the greatest of all Christmas entertainment for children! I might start a new thread to discuss this, as Americans know nothing about it...and it really is something we can all learn so much from when it comes to entertaining children. Oh, no, it isn't!!! Oh, yes, it is!!............


Not a fellow Brit, but I do know (and tolerate) many of them. Smile Philadelphia is home to the biggest (only?) Mummers parade in the country. It takes place January, 1, every year. Check out http://www.mummers.com/ There are links to UK groups that perform plays and rituals. This is a HUGE event here in Philly with festivities going all day and all night.

I had planned to go several years back, but was feeling a little ill that morning. Must've caught a bug. Smile
Brian Lehr
View Profile
Inner circle
Edmonton, Canada
1600 Posts

Profile of Brian Lehr
Sheesh, this has gotten off topic, hasn't it?

Welllll .... if any of you are familiar with the band Great Big Sea (from Newfoundland), try and locate their song called "The Mummer's Song". It tells about what traditional mummering is like in Newfoundland. No parades, no plays; just lots of partying.
One group gets dressed up so that no one can recognize them. They go from house to house saying, "Please, let the mummers in." If they're invited in, they bring in their musical instruments (guitar, accordion, fiddle, spoons, etc.) and start playing music for their hosts. The hosts feed them some snacks and drinks, and try to guess who they are.

Many times the hosts will end up getting dressed up and join the mummers as they go to other homes.

Unfortunately, this is a form of entertainment that is dying out in certain parts of the province, as criminals are deciding to take advantage of the generous open-door policy of many Newfoundlanders. Very sad.

Brian
Jolly Roger
View Profile
V.I.P.
Sedona, Arizona
1645 Posts

Profile of Jolly Roger
We are, indeed, definitely, way off topic. This thread started some time ago with me asking if anyone had any questions about marketing. Donald was the first one to utter forth, and from there we have discussed all sorts of things from Linking Rings to Guy Fawkes to Mummers!!
As I said, it may be best if I answer any questions you may have. Kent has done a smashing job outlining the basics, but I have a lot to contribute. However, it is such a vast subject, and so much has been written about it, that I would prefer specific questions. It always amazes me that people spend vast amounts of money to learn about the dos and don'ts of this from the latest marketing guru when it is all very simple. Have I whetted anyone's appetite?
Donald Dunphy
View Profile
Inner circle
Victoria, BC, Canada
7382 Posts

Profile of Donald Dunphy
Roger -

First specific question for you:

How do YOU promote your shows when you are doing a show? What do YOU say, do, and give away?

- Donald
Donald Dunphy is a Victoria Magician, British Columbia, Canada.
Jolly Roger
View Profile
V.I.P.
Sedona, Arizona
1645 Posts

Profile of Jolly Roger
Hello Donald............welcome back to this thread. I thought you had disappeared behind my COI for ever!!

OK, I have to respond to your question with a question. What shows are you refering to? Every market requires a different approach. That is key. So you know, I do Birthday parties, Day-cares, School assemblies, Voice overs, Bar Mitzvah's, Bat Mitzvahs, Walkabout magic (Mix and Mingle for the British) for children and adults, Comedy magic act for adult birthdays and small functions, cruises, television, large adult corporate functions, and Trade Shows. I have also recently launched a very successful business selling a few of my favourite products and routines to the magic community! I do not spend money with Dave Dee, Dale Carnegie, or any of the now numerous entrepreneurs who advertise in magic magazines and the like, who are for the most part out to make a buck for themselves.....which is just fine. I am not putting them down.
Donald Dunphy
View Profile
Inner circle
Victoria, BC, Canada
7382 Posts

Profile of Donald Dunphy
Quote:
On 2006-11-06 23:50, jolly roger wrote:
I do not spend money with Dave Dee, Dale Carnegie, or any of the now numerous entrepreneurs who advertise in magic magazines and the like, who are for the most part out to make a buck for themselves.....which is just fine. I am not putting them down.


As far as I know, Dale Carnegie never sold magic, nor marketing. Are you sure you don't have him mixed up with someone else? (Dale is the author of the classic book "How to Win Friends and Influence People", and also "How to Stop Worrying and Start Living". Those books were first written around the 30's. He passed away years ago. I have taken Dale Carnegie courses, which helped my business, but have met few magicians who have taken that training.)

Anyways, for the sake of discussion, let's talk about birthday shows.
Donald Dunphy is a Victoria Magician, British Columbia, Canada.
Jolly Roger
View Profile
V.I.P.
Sedona, Arizona
1645 Posts

Profile of Jolly Roger
Hello Donald,

I know very well who Dale Carnegie is..........and I slipped his name in on purpose, just to make sure you were awake!! I knew from a mutual friend of ours, who lives in Toronto, that you were a big fan of his books and courses. Good stuff, I agree. However, if it helped you with your business, surely that is a form of marketing is it not? Marketing is all about expanding and selling your product...i.e. The Great Donaldini? If your business has improved as a result of reading DC, then your income will no doubt have increased. Therefore, you are a more desired product in the market. Right?

It's getting late. I will talk about marketing birthday parties tomorrow. Goodnight!
Donald Dunphy
View Profile
Inner circle
Victoria, BC, Canada
7382 Posts

Profile of Donald Dunphy
I had a feeling that you slipped it in there on purpose. Good ol' ML. Smile

- Donald

P.S. I have taken the Dale Carnegie Sales Advantage Course, which is about selling, or more importantly, getting your customers to "buy" rather than you "sell". The most important thing I got from the training (Sales Advantage and the Dale course) was working on who I was as a person and improving my confidence.
Donald Dunphy is a Victoria Magician, British Columbia, Canada.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Jolly Roger's Marketing Strategies......Finally!! (0 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6~7~8~9 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.29 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL