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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The side walk shuffle » » Building your own table (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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gaddy
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Quote:
On 2007-04-30 00:36, Pokie-Poke wrote:
This thread was meant to be about the pros/cons of building your own table, and I am sorry I tossed gas on this fire as it is no longer fun.
1, no I have never bin arrested, but some one I know was. He has bin performing in the same spot for better than 20 yrs. long before all this permit garbage. He had a legal permit at the time and showed it to the cops. the cops said it was fake and brought him in. the next day the judge thew it out as it was a good permit but it took a month to get his stuff back.
I have bin asked to move along, told to move along, threatened and harassed, but that is it. most police are cool, some are not.

When I said the street was dyeing, I was not referring to busker fairs ren fairs ect. I meant that there are less places that you can just set up and perform as a busker. It is evolving like all things do. Mandrake mentioned his problems with his local permit. and that is part of the evolution.


one word: NINEELEVIN......

yawn.

still, it's the reality we all live in now. Get used to it.
*due to The Magic Cafe's editorial policies, words on this site attributed to me cannot necessarily be held to be my own.*
geemack
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Greg McNeil Peoria,Illinois
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Quote:
On 2007-04-29 12:41, Frank Starsini wrote...

How many of you use a Eureka base or a Viking base?
They are priced similarly and I'm wondering what the differeneces are.
I use the Eureka base. It's a good one, but there are a couple of minor issues. First, the threaded fitting on the upright tube, the one that threads into the flange, requires some modification to make it sturdy. I changed it for a much more substantial threaded adapter which I secured to the end of the pole with three screws.

And as Bill mentioned, the screws securing the flange to the top may be subject to working loose. I solved that concern by adding a small block of wood, about 3/4 inch thick by 4 inches square, glued and screwed to the center underside of the table top. That allowed me to use much longer screws to connect the flange to the top.

Also, there seems to be a practical limit to the size of top you can use on a Eureka base. Anything much bigger than about 18 inches square starts to reduce the stability, even more so the higher you set it. This stability issue could be especially important if you use heavy cups and/or bang around on the table with any amount of force. For most guys I've seen doing cups routines, an 18 inch square top seems pretty small. But it can work if your style is subdued and the cups are smallish like tennis ball sized.

I use an 18 inch square top on mine. It works well for nearly everything I do, but I don't use big heavy cups and I don't produce a a whole fruit stand full of final loads. However I am working towards changing to these monster Mega Thick Tall Animals, so I'll need to make a larger, more rectangular top. I've considered attaching two flanges, one towards each end. Then I can attach two matching Eureka type bases. That would certainly improve the end to end stability, and provide the added benefit of setting the heights separately for a bit of left/right leveling adjustment.

I've never used the Viking table, but the ad says it's only 1-1/2 pounds. I've weighed the Eureka base at about 3-1/2 pounds, so the Viking would be a lot nicer to haul around on the street. I'll have to think about that weight difference when I upgrade, especially if I decide to drag around a matched pair of them.

Greg
ed rhodes
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Must be nice to look at the hardware store and actually know what half the stuff does!

Me, if I had the money, I'd buy a decent table and hang the cost. But I don't so I'll keep using the Wal*Mart folding table.
"There's no time to lose," I heard her say.
"Catch your dreams before they slip away."
"Dying all the time, lose your dreams and you could lose your mind.
Ain't life unkind?"
Bill Palmer
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There is a way to make sure the flanges stay on the table top. Here's what you need. First, determine the largest size flathead screw that will fit through the holes in your flange. Then get some T-nuts of that size. Assuming that your table top is made of 3/8" plywood, which is a good thickness, cut a square of the same wood and glue it to the center of the table top. Use some short nails to act as clamps while the glue dries. Next, turn the table top upside down on a workbench and center the flange on the additional square of wood. Mark the location of the holes for the flathead screws. Using a drill that is the same size as the diameter of the screw, drill all the way through both layers. Now, take a Forstner bit that is 1/4" larger than the threaded section of the Eureka base column, and drill a very shallow hole in the center of the wooden spacer block that you glued and nailed to the table top. Drop in a steel washer that just fits the hole. I'll explain what this is for later.

Next, turn the table top right side up and drill out the bolt holes to the outside diameter of the threaded section of the T-nuts. Drill this only to a depth equal to the thickness of the T-nut. Chamfer the opening so when you put in the T-nuts, they will go all the way in. If you wish to really do this right, make the hole 1/16" deeper. Then using a forstner bit the same size as the T-nut, drill a 1/16" deep hole to accommodate the top part of the T-nut.

Apply vaseline to the ends of the bolts. Roughen the outside of the t-nuts with a file or coarse sandpaper, then clean the T-nuts with solvent. Mix up enough epoxy to attach the T-nuts permanently to the table top. Use 30 minute set epoxy, if this is your first time to do this. Apply epoxy to the places where the T-nuts go, insert the T-nuts, then (with the top of the table top upwards) place the flange under the holes, insert the greased bolts and screw them down hard. Be sure to place the washer I mentioned earlier in place before you put on the flange, just in case the flange doesn't want to come off. You can superglue it in place, if you wish. Remove the excess epoxy and allow it to set. You will now have a table top that has a flange attached to it in such a way that it will not work loose.

The washer is there to give the top of the screw post of the Eureka base something solid to butt into. This will eliminate the wobbly top. There will still be some wonkiness in the base, but this will eliminate part of it. The main thing is that for a table to be steady, ALL of the weight of the table top MUST be within the footprint of the table.

Once you have done this, paint the table top. Then apply your padding and/or top surface and any kind of trim you need. If you plan to add fringe, add a piece of poplar the same thickness as the width of the part of the fringe the tacks will go through. This will give the tacks something solid to bite into.
"The Swatter"

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Bill Palmer
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One of the most useful and economically efficient tables I ever built was a converted "close-up table." It used to be possible to purchase small tables that were about 6 inches high, 16 inches wide and nine inches from front to back. These had little rubber feet on them. In theory, you would go up to a table in a restaurant, whip this thing out and place it on the table. Then you had a nice surface to work on. For various reasons, they were not very practical.

Some friends of mine decided to make a thing like this that was 24 inches wide, 16 inches from front to back and 14 inches from top to bottom. It had quilted plush as a finish. The top was black velvet. I attached a big pipe flange to the bottom of this monstrosity, took a piece of circular 3/4 inch plywood, 18 inches in diameter, put a flange in the center of it, and covered it with the same kind of plush. An aluminum band around the base finished it off. Then I made a center column out of PVC pipe, which I painted black. The pipe was 3 inches in diameter, so it was very sturdy, but quite light. I could unscrew the base from the pipe and the pipe from the table section, and pack it easily into the trunk of a car or a van.

I had furniture glides on the bottom so it was stable on an uneven surface.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
TheAmbitiousCard
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Good stuff Bill. Thanks for taking the time.
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Bill Palmer
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Glad to help. I have built or modified about 30 tables of various kinds over the last few years. I have several of the old Kellar bases that I keep for various things. There was a time that you could pick them up for about $30 each.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
FunTimeAl
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I just tore apart the trestle-style base (it was rigid, not through mortised & keyed) of the first table I built and am now fitting it with a nice camera tripod that I got for 2 bucks at a garage sale. The height adjuster has a set screw, so I'm not worried about it slipping, and this tripod has a wide base, so I don't think tipping over will be a problem.

But, and here's the reason for my post: I can't stand on my table any longer Smile

I have built 3 different styles of performing tables and all of them were sturdy enough to stand on. Now, I'm losing that for the sake of portability and weight reduction.

Does anyone currently make a lightweight, portable table base that is strong enough to take the abuse that a 180lb moron can dish out in 20 minute increments? I'm looking for home-made advice as opposed to website advice.

I'm not sure that I would trust a restaurant style serving tray base...even if I built it out of hickory and used stainless steel carriage bolts; though, that was my first thought. It seems like it would tip over too easily, especially when I started getting roudy, and the stress on the straps up top would be considerable.

Thoughts?
TheAmbitiousCard
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Chad, you could try a keyboard stand. I use a restaurant stand outdoors and don't mind it a bit. I just don't like the way a keyboard stand looks but they can be very durable.
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jgoldsney
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Here are some table plans that look promising....

http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?......58,42665
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Bill Palmer
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I have used similar tables. To make them steady, it is necessary to make sure the leg spread on the ground is about the same as the size of the top. Otherwise, it is very easy to overbalance the table.

A table needs a design that keeps the center of gravity with in the footprint. If the top is too large for the base, the table will tip over.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
thefire
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I hear you frank
I make table tops as well and I don t think that your tops are over priced at all there is a lot of work involved in creating a nice piece of wood work and we need to remember that the atmosphere we are trying to create for whatever effect that we intend to produce good props play a big part in that goal
zimsalabim
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I enjoy working with wood in my spare time its not about how much my time is worth at all. Its how I relax and its my hobby so I cannot out avalue on that time.

Z
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Who is the Greatest? Everybody else! Borrowed with respect from the late Great Eddie Fechter Owner of the Forks Hotel

Zimsalabim

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rayraysleights
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My table wasn't to expensive. It does look decent though. I found a piece of 3/4 inch ply wood at my dads place he just gave it to me. I glued a thick wool like material to the surface. then used felt and stapled it underneath. For the trim I went to home depot and got some corner molding, that works really nice around the edges. I stained the molding. I was also given a piece of fake leather. I covered the underside with that and put it on with upholstry tacks. It sit on a restaurant tray stand.It was given to me by some one who worked in a coffee shop I asked if they had an extra they would sell and he said just keep this one we don't use it. I have used it for about four years now. I have about 30 dollars in it but I was lucky enough to get a lot of materials for free
http://viewmorepics.myspace.com/index.cf......13605817
her is a pic
Bill Palmer
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I have put my table plans up on the cups and balls museum download page. Just go through the normal gateway and you will see a link that will take you there. The plans are free.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
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