The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Now that’s funny! » » What do Corporate audiences find funny? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page 1~2~3 [Next]
wizardofsorts
View Profile
Special user
Chicago, IL
935 Posts

Profile of wizardofsorts
I've never worked in an office, I've never worked for a corporation, I've actually never had a job besides show business since college, I'm only 28, so I know very little about the corporate market but I think that's where its at. So, what do corporate audiences find funny?

Edd
Edd Fairman, Wizard of Sorts is a corporate magician available for your next trade show, hospitality suite, client luncheon, or company event. http://www.wizardofsorts.com
TheAmbitiousCard
View Profile
Eternal Order
Northern California
13384 Posts

Profile of TheAmbitiousCard
They're just people.
They find humorous stuff funny.

I've done a lot of corporate shows and from these experiences I found that they enjoy especially humorous stuff, especially funny.
www.theambitiouscard.com Hand Crafted Magic
Trophy Husband, Father of the Year Candidate,
Chippendale's Dancer applicant, Unofficial World Record Holder.
Comedy Writer
View Profile
Special user
592 Posts

Profile of Comedy Writer
And comedy. They find comedy material funny.
Rupert Bair
View Profile
Inner circle
?
2112 Posts

Profile of Rupert Bair
We can agree they are tougher, though?

M:C
Dannydoyle
View Profile
Eternal Order
20250 Posts

Profile of Dannydoyle
No, we can't.

People are people.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
gadfly3d
View Profile
Special user
963 Posts

Profile of gadfly3d
I find corporate audiences to be the easiest to work, but I have done a lot of them over many years. Despite what some people say, they like audience participation and some good natured poking fun.

Gil Scott
Mediocre the Great
View Profile
Inner circle
Rich Hurley
1059 Posts

Profile of Mediocre the Great
I think Corporate clients can be harder because they have high, professional expecations and usually pay accordingly compared to the private parties I've done. Yes, people are people, but corporate work is not for the beginner.
Mediocrity is greatly under rated!
--------------------------------------------

Rich Hurley aka Mediocre The Great!
www.RichHurleyMagic.com
TheAmbitiousCard
View Profile
Eternal Order
Northern California
13384 Posts

Profile of TheAmbitiousCard
The only thing that is for the beginner are things like cub scout meetings, nursing homes, birthday parties for friends, and things like that where you have real people and you can get some gigs under your belt.

I think it's already a given that a corporate event is not for a beginner.
www.theambitiouscard.com Hand Crafted Magic
Trophy Husband, Father of the Year Candidate,
Chippendale's Dancer applicant, Unofficial World Record Holder.
God-glorified
View Profile
Special user
697 Posts

Profile of God-glorified
Whats better (safer or not, just better): Totally clean or a little edgy?
(This is a personal question, I haven't worked for corporations yet)
Ephes. 2:8-9



For by GRACE are ye saved through faith; and that NOT OF YOURSELVES: it is the gift of God: NOT OF WORKS, lest any man should boast.
derrick
View Profile
Inner circle
I dug holes for
1044 Posts

Profile of derrick
Just ask the orginizer who hired you for the event to tell you how she would like to rate the show: G, PG, PG13, R. It will give you a good idea about the type of matearial they want to see - kid show to comedy club material.
Tony Brent
View Profile
Regular user
Orlando, Florida
156 Posts

Profile of Tony Brent
Mike Meyers said in his interview on Inside the Actors Studio on A&E that "funny is simply funny". It's true. Corp. audiences find the same things to be funny as anyone else. If anything, they are starved for entertainment due to the nature of their businesses. I've found them to be easier to entertain than most other groups.

Tony Brent
Outta Control Magic Show
Orlando
Flec
View Profile
Special user
Birmingham, UK
585 Posts

Profile of Flec
Quote:
On 2007-02-20 14:19, Dannydoyle wrote:
No we can't.
People are people.

True, but the setting of your performance does make a difference. I perform for people at weddings when they've had a few to drink, and in the party spirit, and they're fun people to be with. Then the same people book you for their product launch, and now they've got to behave because they're in front of their boss and CEO.

Think about what setting you're in, and there will be different boundaries. Will it be at a trade show, where you may use comedy to your advantage to stop the crowds? Or at an awards ceremony where everyone is on their best behavior? Or in a boardroom where people are still at work?

On the flip side of it, some people look at it in the way that the 'corporate' audience is at work a lot. So the chance to witness magic/comedy/whatever is a get away from the day-to-day routine.
Scott O.
View Profile
Inner circle
Midwest
1141 Posts

Profile of Scott O.
Quote:
On the flip side of it, some people look at it in the way that the 'corporate' audience are at work a lot. So the chance to witness magic/comedy/whatever is a get away from the day to day routine.


I worked one Christmas party this year where the President got up after dinner to talk for "a few minutes." After 45 minutes of droning on about the financial state of the the company -- complete with PowerPoint slides, everyone had been sitting for more than an hour and a half. Then I was introduced. Wow, these folks needed to have some fun. The whole party atmosphere had turned into a business meeting.

That was a tough crowd.
Do not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time you will reap a harvest, if you do not give up. Galatians 6:9
wizardofsorts
View Profile
Special user
Chicago, IL
935 Posts

Profile of wizardofsorts
I guess what I'm looking for our comedy strategies to use to springboard my work. Things such as re-incorporation/recall, unexpected events, comedy in threes, etc. Do you know what I mean? Are there some dos and don'ts of corporate comedy?

Edd
Edd Fairman, Wizard of Sorts is a corporate magician available for your next trade show, hospitality suite, client luncheon, or company event. http://www.wizardofsorts.com
Doug Arden
View Profile
Special user
885 Posts

Profile of Doug Arden
Edd:

Pretty much all I do is adult corporate shows and what seems to work very well for me, among other things, is the "magician in trouble" routines. They seem to find it very entertaining when I "lead them down the garden path and turn the hose on them" so to speak. A lot of people comment favorably about this after my shows.

Doug
Dannydoyle
View Profile
Eternal Order
20250 Posts

Profile of Dannydoyle
I still say people are people.

Why is that tough? What makes people laugh makes them laugh. People by their very nature by and large want to have fun.

If your not getting laughs from a given audience, it is not the audiences fault.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
wizardofsorts
View Profile
Special user
Chicago, IL
935 Posts

Profile of wizardofsorts
I've never blamed my audience. I'm not working in this market much yet. I'm working on material. So, maybe I should just ask, what do people (above the age of 18) find funny?

Edd
Edd Fairman, Wizard of Sorts is a corporate magician available for your next trade show, hospitality suite, client luncheon, or company event. http://www.wizardofsorts.com
nathanallen
View Profile
Special user
Des Moines, Iowa, USA
522 Posts

Profile of nathanallen
Just don't take yourself too seriously. Have fun with the group. I agree with previous posters - funny is funny, whether they be execs or chicken-pluckers. People are people. If you're just getting started in this market, I would sell your act as squeaky-clean, then it wouldn't be too far of a jump from what it sounds like you're doing now. Then you can get a few corporates under your belt, get a feel for the venues, audiences, and pacing of the events, without the added stress of trying out an hour's worth of brand-new material. Good luck!
Nathan Allen, The Maniac of Magic
www.maniacofmagic.com

To buy a prop is nothing.
To write a good routine is something.
To really entertain an audience is everything.
harris
View Profile
Inner circle
Harris Deutsch
8687 Posts

Profile of harris
Corporation work can be divided into several type of events.
Some are sales meetings, some for the entire staff, some for staff and families.

Depending on their needs I adapt the type of effects. The comedy is usually based on my "everyman persona" and foibles of every day life. The sales meetings are more about product introduction, motivation or reinforcement for work well done.

These days I work fairly clean...though my straitjacket routine sometimes brings out double entendres from the volunteer helpers.

Finding the right volunteers is very important in these and other type venues.

Re: Cub Scouts...Blue and Gold’s can sometimes not be a good starting ground.

Saturday Night we had about 300 of them and their wonderful families.

On my reading table this week. “The Actors Way”, by Robert Benedetti.

Harris
Harris Deutsch aka dr laugh
drlaugh4u@gmail.com
music, magic and marvelous toys
http://magician.org/member/drlaugh4u
Autumn Morning Star
View Profile
Grammar Hostess
Today, I corrected grammar in
1379 Posts

Profile of Autumn Morning Star
The best suggestion I can give you is to do your homework. Find out all about the occasion or reason for the gathering, the people, their age, their gender, and essentally the demographics of the group. You want to know if you are performing before, during or after dinner and if there are any other acts on besides you.

An great tool I use to do is to ask the person who hires you: "Tell me what you envision me doing in my presentation." Their reply will also help you sell them the actual show they want. They generally will not discuss an elaborate show if they are not willing to pay for an elaborate show. Before I used this technique, I inadvertantly sold smaller shows on occasion, when the clients would have gone for a more expensive show. You live and learn.

As for my own presentation, I would rather err on the "classy" side than to be a bit "too casual" in my presentation for the corporate arena.
Wonder is very necessary in life. When we're little kids, we're filled with wonder for the world - it's fascinating and miraculous. A lot of people lose that. They become cynical and jaded, especially in modern day society. Magic renews that wonder.
Doug Henning
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Now that’s funny! » » What do Corporate audiences find funny? (0 Likes)
 Go to page 1~2~3 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.19 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL