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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » New Cups Polish (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

davidmagic
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Lubbock, TX, USA
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Another passion of mine is hand-gunning, and I have come across a product that works great for putting a coating on cups without over-polishing and losing the patina; it is RIG Universal Grease, used for blued pistols and revolvers. It never feels greasy and requires very little. Apply with a clean cloth and buff off thoroughly. It will keep your coins from getting oily, and if you perspire greatly, you can wipe it off completely with a cloth, without using a detergent. One $4 jar will last a lifetime, even for a Bill Palmer collection!
Bill Palmer
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I would never put that stuff on a set of cups. I am very familiar with it. I've been involved in sport shooting for more than a decade.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
davidmagic
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Why is that, Bill?
Bill Palmer
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The smell for one thing. Also, I find that I can feel it on the surface.

I also prefer to allow my cups to patinize.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
rikbrooks
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Olive Branch, Mississippi
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I like my copper cups to have a patina, but the brass ones - well, I guess it's the old soldier in me, but I can't possibly own brass that's not shined.

I found a product at Home Depot in the Tools section. It's by Ryobi, and it's a mini polishing system; three wheels for your drill and three different polishing compounds.

My Johnson's are my "everyday" cups. I hit them with that, and each cup took no more than 5 minutes before they were shining like right from the manufacturer.

Now THAT'S gonna save me some time.
Dave V
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There is a product called "Renaissance Wax" that works very well for protecting metal. It has a solvent smell as you're using it, but it goes away as soon as it dries and you buff off the excess. They say it's used in museums to protect valuable antiques, metals, and even leather.

After my cups "aged" to the color I wanted, I sealed them with this wax. It resists fingerprints and daily grime, and protects the patina as well.

Click here for more info.
No trees were killed in the making of this message, but a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
flimnar
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Salt Lake
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Wow, Dave, that sounds like the right stuff! After reading the description, I guess I had better get rid of the Carnauba wax. Thanks for the information!

Flimnar
"This one goes to eleven..." Nigel Tufnel
Tom G
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The second I saw grease in the title, I cringed... I did try a polish called MAAS.
In an email, they told me it would get rid of the black spot that can be found on copper and brass. Well, it does fade them a little, but it's supposed to be a good cleaner and polisher. I'll give it my vote. I have tried Brasso, Blue Magic, and Flitz, and out of the 3, I think Flitz was the best. But, I do think the MAAS does work better. My cousin, who is studying metals in college, told me to that to get rid of, or at least fade, the black spot to use something called citric pickle. After use, it may give copper a pinkish cast which is removed with a cleaner/polisher. Anyone tried this?
Bill Palmer
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I recently purchased a set of copper Paul Fox cups that had an odd finish problem. Two of the cups were heavily patinated, the other had been polished. I tried several different methods of restoring the patina to the one that had been polished. The trick was to match the patina.

I tried several options, then I found a compound called "Tanfastic". It's not cheap, but it is effective. However, the instructions lacked a certain amount of information, which I was able to glean from the seller, as well as from a certain amount of experience.

I tried some commercial jewelry oxidizers. These worked too well. The patina that I obtained with these was deep black. This was not what I needed for this cup. The Tanfastic did not work very rapidly on my first attempts. So I contacted the seller to find out what I was doing wrong. Evidently, the residue from the various polishes I had tried to use to strip off the early attempts had blocked the action of the compound.

Then, I remembered a cleaning solution that would strip it all off -- Tarn-X. This is not good for brass. However, it is recommended on copper. It removes everything. Once I had cleaned the cup with Tarn-X and washed it thoroughly, I applied the Tanfastic with a soft cloth. I polished it into the surface of the cup, manually. In a matter of five minutes, I had restored the color of the mismatched cup. I washed it thoroughly to stop the action of the chemical, dried it well, then applied a very light coat of oil to the surface of the cup. Normally, I would not apply any oil to a cup. However, this completely stops the action of the acids in the patinizing solution. After this has had a chance to penetrate the metal for a day or so, I will wash the cup again.

Tarn-X contains ammonia, so work in a well-ventilated area.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
BSutter
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This is very good information.
Thanks, Bill.

from another Bill
Mr. Muggle
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Thanks Bill; that's one less trip to the Café's Quicksearch function Smile
"Now you're looking for the secret... but you won't find it because you're not really looking. You don't really want to know the secret... You want to be fooled." - The Prestige (2006)
flimnar
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Quote:
On 2007-02-26 13:08, Dave VanVranken wrote:
There is a product called "Renaissance Wax" that works very well for protecting metal. It has a solvent smell as you're using it, but it goes away as soon as it dries and you buff off the excess. They say it's used in museums to protect valuable antiques, metals, and even leather.

After my cups "aged" to the color I wanted, I sealed them with this wax. It resists fingerprints and daily grime, and protects the patina as well.

Click here for more info.


I bought some of this stuff and it is terrific! Once cups have the desired patina, this is a great way to go. Thanks Dave!

Flimnar
"This one goes to eleven..." Nigel Tufnel
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