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docz
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Are there any books, DVDs(I'm sure there are) or websites that offer tips on how to get to the next trick when you just finnished one? For instance, let's say I want to do an ACR, move onto TTA, going to Blizzard, then a Svengali Deck, after that onto Mercury, and finnish with a Color Monte. Probably not a good set, but what I'm wondering is how can I seamless move from trick to trick, if the tricks require different setups?

Doc-Z
MagiClyde
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I'm not sure if there is a good way. What I do know for certain is that you don't want to fill the switch time with dead silence. It's an audience attention and control killer.

About the only time I've seen anyone do it is with restaurant routines when a magician friend switches from one type of trick (cards for example) to another like the No. 2 pencil.
Magic! The quicker picker-upper!
Wes65
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Like any form of entertainment it has to flow and it has to have natural breaks.

Most of what I do is with coins. I try to eliminate take outs and put up. In other words if I am doing a trick with four coins I start with a four coin production then I'll do another trick or two with the four coins then vanish one and do a three coins routine or vanish three and do a one coin routine. Of course sometimes you are ditching the extra coins or some times they are secretly required or sometime you just palm them and hide them.

Your whole performance should be like the performance of an orchestra. Through out it builds to creshendos then backs off. Use humor or some other form of entertainment to fill the gaps and pause at all the magical moments.

Don't let your audience get bored.....however you can bore them by moving too fast as well as two slow. You can also bore them by sticking to one theme or routine too long.

Have variety and keep the gaps filled.
Wes
Dynamike
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That would be all up to the individual. People have different taste. Do whatever fits you.
Loual4
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This is a very good question, and not a very easy one to answer. I can answer it in one word, and that word can be very vague: ROUTINE!

In the various shows that I have, whether it is children shows, or walk around, close-up, etc..., I try to have a story that makes it normal to switch from illusion to illusion. For example, in my kids show I start with cane to silk, Homing card, rabbit appearance, Inv. deck... I know it sounds like a weird sequence of illusions, with the story and patter, it all flows naturally... You have to establish a routine!

Have a nice day!

Louis Jutras
Jaz
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I don't know of any resources for what you want.

One suggestion is to use a theme such as gambling demonstration.

Another idea is to use the same cards for a couple of tricks.
For example, if you use the four aces then do a couple of tricks with them to show how magical they are.

Or.. Use a selected card, such as in and ACR, for a couple of tricks.

You can simply say that you want to try something new and move to a different routine.

Using Color Monte is no big to do since the cards are so different anyway.

Not all tricks work smoothly together well. It takes some exploring to find those that do.

Quote:
Wes says:
You can also bore them by sticking to one theme or routine too long.


He's right. Especially if your using the same props continuously.
A set of about three card tricks, that work well together, is long enough.

Good luck.
pradell
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Se·gue Pronunciation[sey-gwey, seg-wey]. . .
3. to make a transition from one thing to another smoothly and without interruption: The conversation segued from travel anecdotes to food.
4. an uninterrupted transition made between one musical section or composition and another.
5. any smooth, uninterrupted transition from one thing to another.

How one does this depends upon the style of the performer and the type of show being performed. There are magicians who posit that everything should to make sense to an audience in a magic show. That is, there should be a reason why you are going from trick to trick.
Others have different styles.
A good segue can be as simple as having a one sentence intro to give to the audience between illusions.
On a stage a good segue involves not turning your back to the audience unless absolutely necessary or for dramatic effect.
For a kid show it may be wise to have a couple of options, i.e. effects available for a segue depending upon how they are reacting to your last trick.
Try out different options and see how they go over....
:magicrabbit:
docz
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Thanks for all your feedback! Maybe I should use a more detailed setting. I'm a newbie at this, and I perform for relatively small groups of people, family and friends. Usually I do maybe two - four tricks. But I do this on request, and I thought it would be cool if I could do a set of tricks as a sequence. But since many tricks require a setup and preparation, it's hard to that on the fly, at least for me. So if I do a twisting aces trick, and the next trick requires both the aces and the kings, but the kings need to be on top of the deck, but the audience can't know that they are there... how do I do that? Do I set it up while looking for the aces for the first trick? Or do I keep a second deck in my pocket? Are there any resources on making such transitions as fluid as possible?

Doc-Z
Dynamike
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It would be best if...

...you purchase a few/more dvds and books, studying them so it would come natural to you.

...go to magic shop/club in your area show they will be able to show you in full view.

...take classes on magic.
damkat69
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For me it is all in the presentation, if I talk about one trick while doing it there is usually something in common with the next trick I am about to preform, so I present it like that, using the similarities as a gate way into the next effect.
MagiCanada
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Try to think of your presentation as a story - a beginning, middle, and an end. As long as there is a reason to put those parts together it will make sense and be perfect. You've got to do whatever works for you AND your audience - so know your audience.

If you have a presentation of just different "tricks" it's not as good... it's like trying to tell a story with a beginning, a beginning, and a beginning - it doesn't make sense, it's not enjoyable, and it's just not done.

Make your magic a story which captivates your audience.

I hope what I've said makes sense and helps a little.

Neil
docz
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Offcourse it makes perfect sense! Smile I guess I'll try to figure out how to move everything to another level. Right now I'm at the "part tricks" stage. And I've focused everything into a sort of "you don't want to play cards with me, because I'm magical..." type of thing. Thanks again for all the great feedback!

Doc-Z
Aus
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I think there is a limitation to what you ask depending on the tricks in your set. Say for example “Out of this World” to an effect that uses another full deck stack. Not the best match made in heaven unless you have a quick and efficient way to conveniently stack the deck just used, switch the deck in a way that appears natural or above suspicion or just be open handed about it and say, “now for my next trick” and remove the necessary deck or gimmick cards. However I do wont to point out that if all your doing during your performance is grabbing one deck for another or a group of cards for another, it wont take to long for a spectator to put two and two together and see that special cards are in play.

Bro John Hamman did a faked deck routine where all gaffs where set up in progression order from the top down, this had the appearance of a normal deck well limiting the need to go to the pockets for changes or swaps etc and all he had to do was go to the deck on the table. Nothing more natural as far as I am concerned. This obviously is no good in terms of where whole gaff decks are involved so in the end it may just come down to effect selection.

Open progression maybe the answer, think of additional effects that have an extra advantage in putting you in an advantages situation. For example you have an effect that needs a red back deck (because of the colour of your gaffs for augments sake) and another effect that uses blue gaffs so needs a blue back deck. Why not put a colour changing deck routine in-between them both in your act. Makes sense from a logistical point of view and a presentational point of view. As I said before, it comes down to effect selection.

I guess the secret is a mixture of all the above suggestions in your act, effect selection, deck switches, open progression and set up. Think of what you do and how you do it and how it appears from the spectator’s point of view, and I feel there you’ll find most of your answers.

Loual4 in a replay to you has already said routining may have the answer as well. I have already written extensively about this on the café and I leave a link for it below for you to read.

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......forum=41

Magically

Aus
docz
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Thank you so much for all that information! You are right, I should try to see if I can find tricks that go well together, and practise the transitions.

Doc-Z
airship
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Think, as they say, 'outside the box'. For example, if your first trick uses a packet, your second a stack, your third a key card, and your fourth a stripper deck, Then just stack the stripper deck, put your packet on top, and you can perform all four without a switch. Your only 'move' would be to pocket the packet after your first trick, which is easily done.
'The central secret of conjuring is a manipulation of interest.' - Henry Hay
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