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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » If doing a Trade Show Tour, did you change your act? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

mesmer
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Guys,

If you guys booked to do 7 city tour for the same company, and the Goals for the performance is delivering the company message, did you guys change your act in every city? Since in every city the audience is difference but only 4 VIP people from the company will follow the tour to manage the whole event

Thank You for your kind Reply
Mr Amazeo
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As always, same show, different audience.

They are booking the 'show.' There shouldn't be any need to change anything, unless you've been asked too. Minor tweaking will always be happening, but almost all of it stays the same.

Hope that makes sense.
harry the snail
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Always keep the same act.
ssucahyo
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Friend,

Surely I will do the same act, and about the 4 VIP people, tell them not to see your act!!! BUT watch the audience reaction, how the happy,how the laugh...!
Or maybe if necessary, you can change your act 1 or 2 only.

Cheers,
CC.
Dannydoyle
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The old story of "A pro does the same tricks for different people, an amature does different tricks for the same people" applies here.

I can't understand why you would even consider changing the act to tell the truth.

The company would probably like the same act.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
harry the snail
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The greatest trade show magician of them all, Eddie Tullock kept the same act for 50 years. I think you should too. For one thing it makes your task a lot easier! I believe that you should leave gaps in your scripts for company messages so that if you work for a different company at another time you still have the same act but a different sales message.

I suppose after a while and quite a bit of experience at trade shows it wouldn't do any harm to have another one or even two acts to make things more interesting for you but they should also be honed and never altered except very slowly through the fullness of time.

However generally speaking the advice of keeping to the same act holds good. That way you can concentrate on your audience and doing a good job for the company and not be worrying about your tricks.

Again you should be able to do the act in your sleep.
No. Keep the same act.
mesmer
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Thank you for your suggestions guys
cheers!
MrHyde
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Mesmer

In situations like this, I would try to change methods,
rather than routines.

This will keep the wise guys on their toes.

This is important in trade shows especially.
The sales team will start to savvy up about what you are doing.
They may even start to share this knowledge with customers, a bit like drinks staff at Vegas showrooms sometimes do to increase tips.

Sales guys do it as a way of building relationships with customers.
(You are there to build business after all, so they see it as fair game.)

Changing methods every now and then, will also keep them interested.
Try building a good crowd at a trade show when the sales staff are bored to tears, having seen your show time after time, compared to building a crowd at a show where the staff are keen to see what you are going to do this time. Amazing difference.
gadfly3d
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I actually lost a trade show customer because the sales people got bored with my act, this makes no sense but did happen.

Gil Scott
MrHyde
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Crazy isn't it...

You can be a bit proactive about this, in your initial meeting with them.

Flag the fact that they will get bored with the show, but stress the importance of staying "up" about it. Then again, after your first show when they come up raving about it, remind them to "remember this moment, as it's how the audience will still be feeling in 2/3 days, even if they are not. It does help
jlevey
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Quote:
On 2007-04-20 22:25, MrHyde wrote:
Crazy isn't it...

You can be a bit proactive about this, in your initial meeting with them.

Flag the fact that they will get bored with the show, but stress the importance of staying "up" about it. Then again, after your first show when they come up raving about it, remind them to "remember this moment, as it's how the audience will still be feeling in 2/3 days, even if they are not. It does help


Excellent advice!
Jonathan
Max & Maxine Entertainment
Magicians with a touch of comedy!
___________________________________
www.maxmagician.com
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Bob Sanders
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In corporate magic, I'm more likely to change the patter than the actual routines. That is because the vocabulary, level of responsibility and capacity to comprehend of the audiences change. It is also because the connection to the sponsor changes.

Entertaining the owners of the restaurant chains is very different from entertaining the cashiers. We are there to get their support for brand "T" chicken but one buys for the chain and the other makes customer food order suggestions. (Also one is making minimum wage with a high school education and the other is a multi-millionaire with two graduate degrees.) Serve the audience you've got. One owns other corporations who can hire you. The other will likely be working somewhere else in two years and makes recommendations to no one in the corporate decision structure.

A big mistake I fine non-business people make is that they assume supervisory people are managers. WRONG! They are administrators. They don’t even enter into corporate decision making at the strategic level. It’s not unlikely that they don’t even know a corporate manager in the organization. Come from top down.

Bob Sanders
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Bill Palmer
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Don Alan, who was one of the best trade show magicians, ever, told me about something that happened to him. He worked for Anixter cable. He had worked for them for about 10 years. He worked the booth, then he would work the hospitality suite.

This particular year, he decided to change it all up. He knew they must have been bored with his act. So, that night in the hospitality suite he did a different set of routines. The fellow who ran the activity came up to him when he finished and asked, "Where was that one with the ball and the cup? And what about that one where the card rises out of the deck? There are some people who drove hundreds of miles just to see you do those. And THOSE TRICKS ARE THE REASON WE HIRED YOU."

He said, "I understand. Tell them to wait right here." He went up to his room, got his other material, and came back down. He did his old show for them, and everyone was happy.
"The Swatter"

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argent
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The key to this is very simple. I agree entirely with Mr Palmer that you should keep to the same material at trade shows. The exhibition floor is not the place for experimentation. You must keep to the same act just as Eddie Tullock did for 50 years. Everything is timed and honed so you can concentrate on putting your message across to attendees.

It is true that the salesmen may get somewhat jaded after a while seeing the same act all the time. Hopefully the leads and business you bring them will help to ease this somewhat. Money talks.

However here is what you do to ease the situation. Between your official shows you can perform tricks just for them and these can be different ones from the stuff you perform for the attendees. Have a large repertoire of them and impress the heck out of the salesmen when you feel in the mood. Don't do it when the boss is around! He might be wondering if the salesmen are doing any work! On the other hand the boss might like it too!

It is very important to impress the sales people with your magic. They will go back to the head office and rave about you and probably invent reasons that you are bringing in business to the company that may or may not be true.

The real reason they want you there will be the entertainment you are providing to THEM rather than the attendees! After all they are not the ones who have to pay you.........
Dannydoyle
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A business that does not see the difference in your entertaining their sales force, and entertaining people who spend tens of thousands of dollars, is not a company I personally want to work for.

They will not be in business too long if they don't see a difference.

Here is the point Don Alan made to me. Sales people have a script they follow. NOBODY gets bored with it. A good sales force has talking points, and scripts very similar to what we use. A well trained sales force understands the need for tight scripting and having planned responces to questions and objections.

Any company that hires you and does not know these things may not be a repeat customer, as they may not be in business that long.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
argent
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I agree with Danny of course but I emphasise that the company doesn't actually know you are entertaining the sales force with my scenario. They merely hear from the sales force how wonderful you are and the reps will con themselves and the company that you are bringing in business and are a wonderful asset. You may be or you may not be depending on your own competence and understanding of what you are there for.

However the reps can be your best friend or your worst enemy. If they don't like you then you are toast no matter what business the company thinks you are bringing in. If they do like you then you will stay longer even if you aren't bringing in a cent.

Note I said "longer". I didn't say you would last for ever. Still every little helps.

If the reps can be your best friend or your worst enemy then I think you may as well cultivate the former rather than the latter. And a good way to cultivate the former is to show them magic privately unless you happen to be absolutely dreadful and the only tricks you can do are in your official act.
mesmer
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Thank your for the GREAT post Guys!...do keep them coming....I already do one of the part from the 7 tour....so far they like how their sales message get accross with my show.....6 more city to go,...I'll keep you guys posted...and tommorrow at 19th of may, I will fly to another city for the 2nd performance
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