The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Write Off! (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
kregg
View Profile
Inner circle
1958 Posts

Profile of kregg
So the writer's union is gassing about another strike. I immediately thought, 'No really, you guys still write?"
From the revamped (often poorly) classic remakes, including crappy adaptations of even crappier 70's television shows to yet another virtual "reality" survivoresque/"talentshow"/next big star/builder/artsy-craftsy/bad parent/bigbrother/Satarday Night Live never ending garbage, not to mention pundits who punt on second down; I figured that all of writer's had been killed on the set of Lost (sarcasm alert).

I lost two parts last year after my second callback, because the script wasn't set and my character's were written out. The movies were bombs. I read for one commercial that was so poorly written, I asked, "Is this the final draft?" Needless to say, I didn't get a call back, but, I haven't seen the commercial either.

Where have all the great screenwriter's gone? Smile
POOF!
MagicSanta
View Profile
Inner circle
Northern Nevada
5845 Posts

Profile of MagicSanta
I'm semi retired...
kregg
View Profile
Inner circle
1958 Posts

Profile of kregg
You'd better get back into the game ole boy. Smile
POOF!
Bob Sanders
View Profile
Grammar Supervisor
Magic Valley Ranch, Clanton, Alabama
20527 Posts

Profile of Bob Sanders
I agree with kregg. The creative writers are in short supply. The programing shows it too!

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander

PS --- Craig,

Come join us at the ranch November 3 for the CANVAS Art Festival. We'll scheme on what's next.
Bob Sanders

Magic By Sander / The Amazed Wiz

AmazedWiz@Yahoo.com
MagicSanta
View Profile
Inner circle
Northern Nevada
5845 Posts

Profile of MagicSanta
They don't need screen writers any more. Cheaper to use old scripts and remake movies that don't need re made. You can take a television script, change the characters around so it looks a little different then re do an old episode. Art is gone and dollar signs are the only thing that matters. Do note I realize that studios are businesses and are there to make money but when they produce a lesser product in order to just eek out a few more pesos that is sticking it to the consumer.
DeadDave
View Profile
Regular user
Atlanta, GA
176 Posts

Profile of DeadDave
I've often wondered: How hard can it be to adapt a book to a screenplay?

I'm in the book business, and have read some truly amazingly good books over the years. But when I go to the movies it's the same old recycled crap. Even when they do adapt a book to film they usually botch it. (An exception being "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas"-I thought Terry Gilliam did a fine job directing that one)

I don't go to movies much anymore. They keep giving us the same tired garbage as always. Or maybe I'm just remarkably hard to entertain???
Josh Riel
View Profile
Inner circle
of hell
1999 Posts

Profile of Josh Riel
I didn't realize TV had writers I thought the actors were really that stupid. Although I can't see why that wouldn't be true regardless.
Magic is doing improbable things with odd items that, under normal circumstances, would be unnessecary and quite often undesirable.
kregg
View Profile
Inner circle
1958 Posts

Profile of kregg
As an actor I can tell you Josh ... we really are that stupid. Smile
POOF!
Josh Riel
View Profile
Inner circle
of hell
1999 Posts

Profile of Josh Riel
I meant everyone except you Kregg........
Magic is doing improbable things with odd items that, under normal circumstances, would be unnessecary and quite often undesirable.
Steven Steele
View Profile
Chief of Staff
1901 Posts

Profile of Steven Steele
I think many of the writers have moved from the networks to the other stations. 24, Monk, Psych, and Mad Men are all well written shows, in my opinion. HBO and Showtime have great shows from time to time, but the networks seem to be losing a lot of the talent.
rossmacrae
View Profile
Inner circle
Arlington, Virginia
2464 Posts

Profile of rossmacrae
Some pretty cogent thoughts, from inside the WGA ranks, here:

http://www.newsfromme.com/ (search for WGA)

Blog has pretty good daily thoughts on this and that, too.
ed rhodes
View Profile
Inner circle
Rhode Island
2807 Posts

Profile of ed rhodes
Quote:
On 2007-10-11 01:09, DeadDave wrote:
I've often wondered: How hard can it be to adapt a book to a screenplay?


You'd be surprised. Look at the Harry Potter novels, if they filmed them directly, you'd have nine hour movies with people talking at each other a lot.

I remember seeing "The Princess Bride" which I'd read three times and one of my favorite sequences (the decent down the stairs) was cut. I was so enrapped in the unfolding of the story, I didn't even realize the scene had been cut until thinking about the movie afterwards!

At the same time, "I, Robot" was a sad little exercise (although I enjoyed it as popcorn fodder and eye candy) which took a completely different story and grafted Isaac's character names and title onto itself!
"All the world's a stage, but the play is badly cast!" - Oscar Wilde
stoneunhinged
View Profile
Inner circle
3067 Posts

Profile of stoneunhinged
I was watching "Lord of the G-strings" yesterday, and it wasn't anything like the book *at all*.

I wonder what happened.

Jeff
kregg
View Profile
Inner circle
1958 Posts

Profile of kregg
There is a reason we call them movies instead of talkies. Smile
The action serves as the greater part of the narrative. That said, the best poetry when read or recited is wonderful, but, on film it can get a bit lofty. As the saying goes "a great director cuts" ... of course this usually results in kicking the writer off the set.
One of the best book adaptations I've seen was Sense and Sensibilities. Though I don't speak German, The Lives of Others was a terrific film. The film goes against the formula driven pulp that thrashes into the pop mainstream.
POOF!
Big Jeff
View Profile
Veteran user
301 Posts

Profile of Big Jeff
I tried to rent Other Peoples lives last week and it was out(about 10 Copies).
DeadDave
View Profile
Regular user
Atlanta, GA
176 Posts

Profile of DeadDave
[/quote]

You'd be surprised. Look at the Harry Potter novels, if they filmed them directly, you'd have nine hour movies with people talking at each other a lot.

I remember seeing "The Princess Bride" which I'd read three times and one of my favorite sequences (the decent down the stairs) was cut. I was so enrapped in the unfolding of the story, I didn't even realize the scene had been cut until thinking about the movie afterwards!

At the same time, "I, Robot" was a sad little exercise (although I enjoyed it as popcorn fodder and eye candy) which took a completely different story and grafted Isaac's character names and title onto itself!
[/quote]


A list of things that "I, Robot" had in common with the Asimov book:

1. The title.

I realize that it can be difficult to adapt a book. Certain things have to be cut for the sake of a concise storyline. My point was that usually when they DO adapt a book they screw it up. "The Perfect Storm" is a good example. That was a great book, but the movie? Not so much. It had something in common with some of the Harry Potter movies in that if you hadn't read the book you had no idea WHAT was going on. On the opposite end of the scale, see "The Maltese Falcon". You can read along with the original Dashiell Hammett novel. They are identical! I'm not saying this is necessarily desirable, but you gotta admit that's pretty interesting from a film adaptation standpoint.
(BTW, "The Maltese Falcon" had been made into a film twice before, but they both flopped. The producers finally insisted that it follow the book exactly. Whammo! Instant classic!)
ed rhodes
View Profile
Inner circle
Rhode Island
2807 Posts

Profile of ed rhodes
Quote:
Mandrake01 wrote:
You'd be surprised. Look at the Harry Potter novels, if they filmed them directly, you'd have nine hour movies with people talking at each other a lot.

I remember seeing "The Princess Bride" which I'd read three times and one of my favorite sequences (the decent down the stairs) was cut. I was so enrapped in the unfolding of the story, I didn't even realize the scene had been cut until thinking about the movie afterwards!

At the same time, "I, Robot" was a sad little exercise (although I enjoyed it as popcorn fodder and eye candy) which took a completely different story and grafted Isaac's character names and title onto itself!



Quote:
On 2007-10-16 14:59, DeadDave wrote:

A list of things that "I, Robot" had in common with the Asimov book:

1. The title.


To be fair, Susan Calvin as an intense, intelligent robopsycologist was Asimov's creation. Mind you, she was _nothing_ like the character in this film! The idea of a robot hiding among lesser robots he resembles was also lifted from an Asimov story. And the idea of the main computer taking over the robots was delt with in "The Bicentennial Man," although Asimov would never have had it take this extreme. Finally, the concept of the "Zeroth Law" whereupon robots decide that "humanity" is more important than individual "humans" is touched on by Asimov, but again, the robots in Asimov's world would never resort to physical harm to individual humans even if it did serve the greater good of humanity.

So, it could be considered to be Asimov "through a glass darkly!"
"All the world's a stage, but the play is badly cast!" - Oscar Wilde
kregg
View Profile
Inner circle
1958 Posts

Profile of kregg
Mandrake that was a pretty good breakdown. Though you left out Hollywoods favorite bugaboo, evil corporations who seek control of everything; which can only be changed by a violent uprising of the united underdog.
POOF!
DeadDave
View Profile
Regular user
Atlanta, GA
176 Posts

Profile of DeadDave
Sure, sure. But for me to actually make a list of all those things wouldn't have been funny...Smile
ed rhodes
View Profile
Inner circle
Rhode Island
2807 Posts

Profile of ed rhodes
Quote:
On 2007-10-17 09:14, kregg wrote:
Mandrake that was a pretty good breakdown. Though you left out Hollywoods favorite bugaboo, evil corporations who seek control of everything; which can only be changed by a violent uprising of the united underdog.


Yeah, but I was only looking for things in the film that brushed against Asimov's actual concepts... there weren't that many.
"All the world's a stage, but the play is badly cast!" - Oscar Wilde
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Write Off! (0 Likes)
 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2022 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.13 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL