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Bairefoot
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On Saturday night I did a show for 400 people here at Myrtle Beach. I think it went very well. Got a standing O. Probably more for my comedy. Here is what I learned the sound guy had a wireless box that had a transmitter on it. He placed it onto the stage and I plugged my Icue2 in it. I was able to see the display so easy and I could put it where ever I wanted to on the stage. So I am wondering if anyone would know the exact set up (parts and names of the pieces) so that I could buy them?

Thanks

Bairefoot
magicguy22
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He probably used an In ear monitor system to transfer the audio from the stage to the mixer..

An in ear monitor system is used by musicians to allow them to hear themselves, and the rest of the band, without using speaker monitors which are prone to feedback and tend to bleed back into the mix through open mics.

In the band set-up, an audio send from the monitor mixer is sent to an in-ear-monitor Transmitter whose signal is received at a battery powered beltpack receiver. The performer's earphones are connected to the receiver like you would connect an iPod. Then they can wander the stage and always have "the mix" in their ears.

In your iCue application, instead of connecting earphones to the receiver, you would connect the house mixer through a stereo 3.5 mm cable and stereo direct box.

Also, the limiter in the Transmitter should be "disabled" and since the receiver is usually battery powered, a method to power it with an AC adapter would save batteries and make the system more reliable.

Go to http://www.Shure.com they have some articles in their support section for "Point to Point Wireless Audio systems" The Answer ID is #3196
g0thike
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Dan "roadie" or others,

Please share some more........... Im all ears

Any drawbacks?

Anyone has experience?

G0THIKE
Michael Messing
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I have always used my iCue Duo on stage with me. Here's how I use it. I use a Y-adapter from the iCue: 1/8" mini plug to RCA plugs (this is the type of cord that ships with the iCue):
http://www.amazon.com/RCA-Stereo-Adapter......0005T3GG

Then, I plug the two RCA plugs to a Horizon Signal Mate DI Box:
http://eventhorizon-srv.com/ecommerce/os......_id=1444 (By the way, I'm not recommending this vendor. I don't know anything about them. They were just the first website I found with a decent photo of the Horizon Signal Mate.)

I then plug an XLR cable into the Signal Mate and connect to the snake or directly to the PA mixer/amp.

The Horizon Signal Mate was a real find for me. Orignally, I went from the iCue with the same Y-adapter and then was combining the RCA signals with a y-adapter to a 1/4" mono plug and then going to a standard DI box. I found that the signal was distorting on some PA systems. I asked Kelly Duro about it and he said the two signals from the iCue should not be combined. He confirmed that they were overdriving the signal.

A local music store recommended the Horizon Signal Mate and it works beautifully. I get a really clean sound from every PA I use it with.

By the way, I didn't have to use the Signal Mate with my older VSM 7.5. I was able to use the 1/8" to RCA y-adapter to the RCA to 1/4" plug y-adapter and then I could use any DI box without any trouble.

If any of this needs clarification, please let me know.

Michael
g0thike
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Thanks Michael.

But lets keep the conversation to sending your audio signal wirelessly.

Audio signal= icue, laptop, IPOD, boombox, mp3tech, or whatever you use.
Michael Messing
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Oops, I didn't notice that he said it was done wirelessly. I'm not sure I'd want to fool with that.

Michael
Bairefoot
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Thanks Michael and Magic Guy. I just didn't know if anyone else knew about this. I am going to try and get in contact with the music guy and find out exactly what it was.

Bairefoot
g0thike
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Baire,

Got in touch with him and let us know.
Dan McLean Jr aka, Magic Roadie
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Quote:
On 2008-02-06 12:00, Bairefoot wrote:
... the sound guy had a wireless box that had a transmitter on it. He placed it onto the stage and I plugged my Icue2 in it ... and I could put it where ever I wanted to on the stage.

Hello, Bairefoot!
Did your iCue plug into a beltpack, or into a desktop-style piece? If your iCue plugged into a beltpack, then he was probably using a standard mic-style wireless system. If your iCue plugged into a desktop-style piece, then he was probably using an in-ear-monitor-style wireless system.

Do you know what type of piece the receiver was? Beltpack or desktop?

I'll be out all day, but will try to check back in on Sunday.
Cheers from Toronto!
Dan McLean Jr
magicguy22
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Dan's Question will help to identify one of the two wireless options. The importance of this is as follows:

The wireless mic system can only transmit one channel of audio,(Left OR Right), so you will lose any separation effects because you only have one of the channels available from the receiver at the mixing board.

The in ear monitor system will multiplex 2 channels of audio (left AND right) so both channels of your music are available from the receiver at the mixing board.

Most PA systems are run in Mono. The Left and Right audio are mixed together, (by a mixer!), and sent to both speakers.

With the wireless mic system for transfering audio, you won't have one of the channels available in the mono mix. This is because, in some music, an instrument or voice in the original track of music may be panned hard to the left or right and if an important cue or sound is not on the channel connected to the wireless transmitter, it will not be transmitted, will not be available at the mixer and can not be added to >either< of the speakers.

With the in ear monitor system, when used to transfer audio wirelessly, any instruments that were panned hard left or right will play in both speakers equally.

Seeya
Bairefoot
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Wow thanks for the information. I have not been able to get in touch with the sond guy. But, It was a little too big to be put on you as for a microphone. I mean a little too thick. It was about twice the size of a deck of cards.

Thanks again

Bairefoot
Dan McLean Jr aka, Magic Roadie
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Quote:
On 2008-02-09 23:17, Bairefoot wrote:
I have not been able to get in touch with the sound guy. But, It was a little too big to be put on you as for a microphone. I mean a little too thick. It was about twice the size of a deck of cards.
Bairefoot

Hello again, Bairefoot!
I'm hoping this thread doesn't get filled with a bunch of speculative, un-needed info, and am still glad to help with your question. Do you recall whether the wireless piece you plugged into ran off batteries, or wall power? The answer to this may help to narrow things down so we can help to answer your question.
Dan McLean Jr
Bairefoot
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I remember he had to trun it off. So Batteries. Thanks man.

Bairefot
Dan McLean Jr aka, Magic Roadie
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Quote:
On 2008-02-10 21:54, Bairefoot wrote:
I remember he had to trun it off. So Batteries.

Bairefot

In that case, it was not an in-ear monitor system. In-ears have desktop transmitters and beltpack receivers. Chances are that it was a standard microphone system, having a beltpack transmitter and a desktop receiver. Given a suitable adapter, many beltpack transmitters can accept input from playback devices, including from something like an iCue.

Before buying a wireless solution, bear in mind that, when compared to using a cabled connection, wireless is much more expensive, much more fragile, more work, and much less reliable.
Cheers from Toronto!
Dan McLean Jr
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