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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Wooden Multiplying Billiard Ball Set (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

vpatanio
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Here is a picture of the set of multiplying billiard balls that I made. They are small...1 1/2", but I think they look great. I was inspired to make my own when I saw the photo that Michael Baker posted of a set that he made.

I hope you guys like 'em, and thank you Michael. Smile

http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee204......04082610

Tell me what you think.

-Vinny
Stanyon
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Nice balls!


Cheers! Smile
Stanyon

aka Steve Taylor

"Every move a move!"

"If you've enjoyed my performance half as much as I've enjoyed performing for you, then you've enjoyed it twice as much as me!"
Michael Baker
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Excellent job, Vinny!!!

They have that glass-like finish just like the paint on a Rolls Royce! How many coats?

Anyone who has never worked with a set of wooden balls with a finish like that, doesn't understand that they are almost as easy to work as silicone balls.

Now, make a few extras for those inevitable times when one hits the floor and knocks out a big chunk of paint!! YIKES!!

~michael
~michael baker
The Magic Company
vpatanio
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I set myself up for that one. Smile

-Vinny
vpatanio
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Michael,

I used one coat of paint, and four coats of poly. I made three extras, for that reason, and wouldn't ya know, I already dropped one. Luckily there was no damage.

-Vinny
Michael Baker
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One color coat? Wow! What brand paint and polyurethane are you using?
~michael baker
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vpatanio
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Michael,

I used Rustoleum enamel and Minwax polyurethane. Each ball was held with a thin sewing needle to allow for even coating. The needles were held with vice grips. I sprayed the enamel (let it completely dry), then for the clearcoat I just dipped the balls in the polyurethane & drained off the excess, let them sit for 30 minutes suspended by the sewing needles, removed excess drip at the bottom of the ball (repeat two times) then let them sit 24 hours. Repeat the clearcoat dipping process 3 more times. You warned me that the hardest part was waiting for the coats to dry and you were right.

-Vinny
Michael Baker
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I haven't tried dipping them as you described. I'll give that a try soon. I discovered the needle idea a long time ago, and it really helps give a nice paint job.
~michael baker
The Magic Company
MickeyPainless
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Very nice Vinny, I've never tried the dipping either but it sure looks like it worked for you! I have dipped wand tips in liquid gold leaf with good results and use a safety pin so I have a hook to hang from.
Bill Hegbli
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Dipping has always been the way to paint Balls. I think Geoffrey Buckingham described this in his book and video. I believe that is where I read it.

He used Lacquer paint.
Vietnam Veteran 1967, Sgt. E-5

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Michael Baker
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I'll definitely give it a try. I know that the final coats should be good wet coats, so as to get the high gloss finish, or else you'll have a harder time palming the balls.

How do you deal with the inevitable paint run, and the drip that will form at the bottom, other than maybe keeping the ball in motion until the paint sets?
~michael baker
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vpatanio
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I eliminated the drips from mine by letting the balls drain with the needle underneath, this provided a "spout" for the excess to run down. Then after about 20-30 mintutes, I turned the balls over so they were now suspended by the needle and began baby sitting with a small paint brush dampened with the polyurethane I used. Every 10 minutes or so, I would brush off the drip. I did this for about an hour, then I checked on them every 30 minutes about 2 or 3 more times. Finally, I let them sit overnight before repeating the process. This is way too much work, but the coat comes out nice and smooth and thick at the same time. I am sure there is a better method and if anyone knows of one I would love a PM or post about it.

-Vinny

P.S. I neglected to mention that I sprayed the paint coat on, so the above process was not needed. The only real problem I encountered was the spot that was left after removing the needle.
Michael Baker
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Wow! You really DO watch the paint dry!! Ha-ha!!

Polyurethane is pretty slow drying, regardless of what the can says. You might want to try clear gloss brushing lacquer instead. Test it first for compatibility with the color coat.

The needle hole is inevitable, but you can dab a little extra paint into the hole later to help fill it.

~michael
~michael baker
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EsnRedshirt
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Hmm, last week, I got lazy and rather than applying four coats of primer, I just tried the dip technique (on a silk p*** made from a plastic egg.)

I'd advise against using the technique with primer- it went on way too thick, and even after wiping off the excess paint one day after dipping, it still took a full three days to dry.

(In other words, being lazy is not often the quickest means to an end. Once the primer finally dried, I used two coats of paint, applied using the standard method.)

-Erik (Day 1)
Self-proclaimed Jack-of-all-trades and google expert*.

* = Take any advice from this person with a grain of salt.
BWind
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Vinny,
They are spectacular! How did you manage making the shell so perfect?
BWind
vpatanio
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Sorry for the delayed reply...

Thank you for the complements!! As for the shell, I cheated. I used a shell from an old multiplying billiard balls set I had and I painted and polyurethaned it to match the rest of the set. There are many ways to make a great shell, but I got lazy.

-Vinny
vpatanio
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I actually wanna try learning a routine without a shell, but I am so poor, that I cannot afford any references to one yet.

-Vinny
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