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JohntheMagician
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Mark,

By your performance last night your getting there dude. Everyone had a good time and it was great to see you get up and perfrom at the meeting.

Good Job & Keep it up!
“The hard must become habit. The habit must become easy. The easy must become beautiful.” ~ Doug Henning
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rockwall
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I would like to add to the advice to learn some tricks that are relatively easy and perform them for friends, co-workers, or even impromtu at the bar or someplace. Before heading to my last business convention where I had decided to perform some strolling magic at the last evenings cocktail party and dinner I practiced for a few strangers at a karaoke restaurant/bar that we had gone to.

One trick I had been working on was the perfect center tear from Richard Osterlinds Mind Mysteries Vol 1. The trick is pretty easy but involves more acting than anything. Just the same, the first several times I went to perform it, I had to really work myself up to do it because I was so afraid that someone would see the peek. The more I did it, the more I realized, people just don't notice it. Especially if you misdirect them with questions about what they wrote and watch their eyes. I've even found that other people who are standing around burning my hands don't spot it. Nothing builds confidence like performing for people and having it work!!

I hope I'm not too far off track. My point is that while learning difficult slights can be frustrating, there are many, many effects that can be performed that are very simple and are just as mind blowing and will help build your love of magic, love of performing, and increase your willingness and desire to work and master the more difficult slights.

Enjoy!!

Mike
Justin Style
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I started practicing the downs palm with silver dollars, on the day Joan Bene Ramsey went missing. It took me more than 6,500 hours of practice before I could produce 8, then roll-out 4 in each hand. I lived with the coins in my hand day and night. In the begining I couldn't even hold the coins, never mind producing and rolling. After all those hours, months and years of practice, I was invited to attend my first time at Fechter's. I did the routine for a room (175) of the best close-up magicians in the world. (April, 1999) It was written in Magic Magazine as being one of the highlights of the convention.

Never give/gave up. On September 16th, 2006 I set three world records for producing the most coins from the downs palm - 10! One hand, one downs palm, 10 U.S. Silver dollars.

Don't ever give up.

Imagine if you were a weight lifter going to the gym for the first time. There is no way that you'll be able to work out and bench press 315 lbs. But with time, dedication and perserveerence you will be able.

Besides, what's the rush? The pleasure comes from the frustration...When you can't today, you will tomorrow! Enjoy the ride.

Good luck!


15/31
Cyar
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Quote:
On 2008-03-15 12:54, Justin Style wrote:
I started practicing the downs palm with silver dollars, on the day Joan Bene Ramsey went missing. It took me more than 6,500 hours of practice before I could produce 8, then roll-out 4 in each hand. I lived with the coins in my hand day and night. In the begining I couldn't even hold the coins, never mind producing and rolling. After all those hours, months and years of practice, I was invited to attend my first time at Fechter's. I did the routine for a room (175) of the best close-up magicians in the world. (April, 1999) It was written in Magic Magazine as being one of the highlights of the convention.

Never give/gave up. On September 16th, 2006 I set three world records for producing the most coins from the downs palm - 10! One hand, one downs palm, 10 U.S. Silver dollars.

Don't ever give up.

Imagine if you were a weight lifter going to the gym for the first time. There is no way that you'll be able to work out and bench press 315 lbs. But with time, dedication and perserveerence you will be able.

Besides, what's the rush? The pleasure comes from the frustration...When you can't today, you will tomorrow! Enjoy the ride.

Good luck!


15/31
I told those f***s down at the league office a thousand times that I don't roll on Shabbos!
Michaels
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Quote:
On 2008-03-12 07:02, Bob Sanders wrote:
Horse trainers use a simple method. Training happens everyday but only for a short period. Quit with successes.

It takes time. But it lasts a lifetime.





Great analogy Bob.....

Learning magic sleights is no different than learning math. The basics take much longer to learn than the advanced concepts as long as the basics are mastered. I have found, that when I have mastered the basic sleights, the more advanced sleights become easier to learn.

To many this post may be common sense and I apologize up front. The original post however, asked for "motivation and mental reinforcement ideas to keep us in the right state of mind".

Important mental ideas:

1) Practice makes permanent, not perfect. It only makes perfect if you're practicing the right technique. If I'm having trouble perfecting a move, I will go back to the book or DVD to make sure I didn't misinterpret or overlook something. If I'm still having trouble, I will ask other professionals or well seasoned amateurs for their advice. One of the advantages of local clubs.

2) "You must fall before you can learn to pull yourself up"- I wish I could source the quote for you! It's OK to fail and to get a little frustrated as long as it's not to the point of quitting. Keep pulling yourself back up and then one day the sleight will just click.

3) Michael Jordan once said, "I never ask what I did wrong....Instead I ask, what can I do to make it better".
The quote speaks for itself. Negative approaches to learning have scientifically been proven to delay learning.

4) Have fun along the journey- If you start to get so frustrated that you become disenchanted, then maybe it's time to try another sleight or as a last resort try another hobby.
Payne Stewart was considering giving up golf because he stopped having fun. Eventually, he changed his mind set from looking at golf as a job to "playing just to have fun". He then started playing better to the tune of winning the US open.

5) And as Bob Sanders said "Quit with success" . Never end any practice session with failure...Even if it means switching gears to another sleight that you do well just as long as the practice session ends on a positive note.


Hope this helps
Michaels
"Our technology is ahead of our humanity"
Albert Einstein
gaddy
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My only real tip on practice is to say- don't be afraid to go slow. I know we all want to amaze our friends as soon as possible, but that attitude only leads to frustration, or failure.

Don't be afraid to take it slow and get it right.
*due to The Magic Cafe's editorial policies, words on this site attributed to me cannot necessarily be held to be my own.*
Justin Style
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Besides magic, I am into bike cycling. I ride long distance and do a lot of climbing. When I see a hill/mountain that I am about to climb, I NEVER think "oh no, this is going to suck." Instead, I think Yeah! Can't wait til I come flying down the other side!

I have a saying: You can't get no thrills, unless you climb them hills!

Keep climbing!


Good luck! You can/will do it!


17/31
Andy the cardician
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Quote:
On 2008-03-17 14:45, gaddy wrote:
My only real tip on practice is to say- don't be afraid to go slow. I know we all want to amaze our friends as soon as possible, but that attitude only leads to frustration, or failure.

Don't be afraid to take it slow and get it right.


Now this is a fantatic advice. Setting yourself smaller goals . . .
Cards never lie
Tony Noice
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This is also one of the problems of the decline of the brick and mortar magic shops. When we met all our colleagues every Saturday, you couldn't help being caught up in the excitement of good sleight of hand. You practiced every second you could to have cool stuff to show the guys next week.
gaddy
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Quote:
On 2008-03-18 00:18, Tony Noice wrote:
This is also one of the problems of the decline of the brick and mortar magic shops. When we met all our colleagues every Saturday, you couldn't help being caught up in the excitement of good sleight of hand. You practiced every second you could to have cool stuff to show the guys next week.


so true- nothing is a better teacher than a group of peers that meet on a regular basis who can advise you and point you in the right direction.
*due to The Magic Cafe's editorial policies, words on this site attributed to me cannot necessarily be held to be my own.*
Justin Style
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Every Saturday magicians meet at Maui Taco in midtown Manhattan.
Cyar
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Quote:
On 2008-03-17 14:45, gaddy wrote:
My only real tip on practice is to say- don't be afraid to go slow. I know we all want to amaze our friends as soon as possible, but that attitude only leads to frustration, or failure.

Don't be afraid to take it slow and get it right.

I'm going to post this somewhere that I'll always see it.
I told those f***s down at the league office a thousand times that I don't roll on Shabbos!
gaddy
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Working in a bar with many regular customers, I get pressure all the time to show off new stuff that I am working on, the temptation to present a half baked idea is soooo great. But I cannot stress strongly enough against it- take it from me, I've blown MANY a great trick that way, before I learned this lesson the hard way.

Good Luck!
G
*due to The Magic Cafe's editorial policies, words on this site attributed to me cannot necessarily be held to be my own.*
ElizFantastic42
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I am new to the Café and I had no idea just how helpful this would all be! I got a reply to my welcome-post (quite quickly and friendly) and planned to glance around the website some more before going on to other chores- that was about an hour and a half ago... I have been riveted reading the posts of others.
Anyways, my comment is on the lack of magic shoppes. In the area where I live there are no magic shoppes, and there is only one in the entire state. Are there any other activities I can look for to be a part of?
Dave McFarland
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I'm definitely in the beginner camp myself, and find practice can be really frustrating. But one thing I've discovered is that I've frequently found I could suddenly do a sleight (after a lot of practice). I used to think if you practiced you'd SLOWLY see yourself getting to the point where you're doing it right...this is probably the case a lot of times..but I've been surprised at how often I've practiced and practiced and felt like giving up when BANG I could do it. Like a flip was switched and my body suddenly understood what it was supposed to do--it's a shocking feeling, but the realization that this is possible keeps me motivated when I feel like I can't master a particular sleight.
ammon
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As a novice I recently purchased Hot Shot Color Changes, which shows about 50 color effects, including several double lifts. Many of the effects have common hand sleights -- palming, dl, etc.

I find that I can practice several chanages and practice a particular sleight at the same time. It also helped me to realize that once you have perfected a single technique, it becomes a tool towards dozens of effects.

That is my motivation.

Finally, I have learned to break down the technique. If I am having a problem with a technique, I find that I need to find out where I am going wrong, and work out on that particular movement. If I always do the entire technique all the time, it becomes frustrating. For example, simply practice moving the thumb over and over again, rather than the entire sleight.

Just an idea.
gaddy
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Quote:
On 2008-03-20 14:34, Dave McFarland wrote:
I'm definitely in the beginner camp myself, and find practice can be really frustrating. But one thing I've discovered is that I've frequently found I could suddenly do a sleight (after a lot of practice). I used to think if you practiced you'd SLOWLY see yourself getting to the point where you're doing it right...this is probably the case a lot of times..but I've been surprised at how often I've practiced and practiced and felt like giving up when BANG I could do it. Like a flip was switched and my body suddenly understood what it was supposed to do--it's a shocking feeling, but the realization that this is possible keeps me motivated when I feel like I can't master a particular sleight.


that's the way the "classic palm" came to me. After weeks and months of gawdawful palming and frustrating practice, it just hit me! And now it feels so natural it even feels strange to me that it COULD feel this natural.

Good Luck!
G
*due to The Magic Cafe's editorial policies, words on this site attributed to me cannot necessarily be held to be my own.*
Andy the cardician
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Another thought went through my mind - being a beginner is a blessing, as it allows the person to have a different look at things - being new to the art.
Cards never lie
Tina I
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Although I have been doing magic to and from for years and years I hardly ever did any cards. But fairly recently, I use the term loosely, I started to grow more and more interested in cards and quickly found out that it was hard! Very hard! As I started to practice I noticed that I couldn't do anything consistently. It was obvious when I did a 'move', I held the deck differently when doing sleights etc etc.

So my first real training had actually to start with simply holding the deck in the 'mechanics' grip. I did that, just held it... felt what it was like, getting used to it for hours on end every evening while watching TV or whatever. Now that is starting with the basics! It payed off ten folds though the first time I could do a DL that looked exactly like when I do a single.
DomKabala
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In the foreword of Card College Vol.V by John Carney, he offers this advice...
He first mentions that we have many lessons to learn and they range from the most basic (learning to stand upright and walk), thru the most complex (relationships, finances, and personal development). Somewhere along the way we may even want to learn something as mundane as a card trick. He continues...
1) Choose your teachers wisely. It would be foolish to deify the first "expert" who crossed your path. The best teacher is a student, someone still searching for answers, someone taking notes, experimenting, and asking questions no one else thinks to ask.
2) Adapt a student frame of mind. The true student seeks out problems, purging imperfections and leaving behind the most purified result.
3) Allow yourself to make many mistakes - once. Perfection is an unreasonable goal, instead we should strive for steady improvement. We will never reach perfection, but with earnest effort we may come close enough to "smell" it's sweet perfume.
4) Have patience because nothing of any significance is learned without time, trial and effort. It is immature of us to believe that everything should fall into our laps, with skill and comprehension flowing like mother's milk. Just because we don't get it the first few days, weeks, or months doesn't mean that we are incapable; it just means we have more work to do.
I rarely read forewords of books and immediately dive into the "bread and butter".
That has changed since I read this. I have taken the time to share this wisdom with those less fortunate and do not have access to the Card College series. I hope it touches you as it has me...
Cardamagically,
Dom
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God is enough, let go, let God. Gal 2:20

"Anything of value is not easily attained and those things which are easily attained are not of lasting value."



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