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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Tradeshow Advice (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

mcvicarthetrickster
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St. Louis, MO
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What's the best way to get started in tradeshows
JasonLinett
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Alexandria, VA
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Quote:
On 2008-04-29 20:07, mcvicarthetrickster wrote:
What's the best way to get started in tradeshows


http://www.sethkramerproductions.com/handbook.htm
Jerskin
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I got started by a friend who had too many to handle & booked me on some. Pays to have successful friends.
GrEg oTtO

MUNDUS VULT DECIPI
obijuan
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New Lenox
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Any successful friends need a new protege?
Jerskin
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Hey Obijuan-based on your photo you're not trade show material-they're more business-guy-in-a-suit.
GrEg oTtO

MUNDUS VULT DECIPI
Jim Snack
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Funny you should ask...that's exactly what I discuss on my audio seminar "Getting Started Working Trade Shows" and in Volume Two of my Success in Magic course. Here's an overview:

You can find trade shows locally, regionally and nationally. My recommendation is to start locally. Your local chamber of commerce or business trade association for example, probably produces an annual B2B (business-to-business) trade show.

These “business expos” are offered as a service to their members and the community. It could also be produced by the society of association executives in your area. Often the local newspaper is a co-sponsor. (This is ideal because it means you could get some good publicity for appearing there.)

Regardless the size of your hometown, you will find such a show. If you don’t, simply switch your strategy and take a look at their annual “home show.” The only difference is that this is a business to consumer show. If you are a member of your local chamber of commerce or society of association executives, you will learn about the show from their monthly newsletter.

There are three ways to appear at the show. One is to simply buy a registration, walk the floor and visit booths. Your goal is prospecting. You want to meet the marketing directors of the companies exhibiting there so you can pitch your services for the next year. You probably won’t be showcasing your talents on the spot (although the opportunity could arise). You are just collecting names so you can follow up later with a sales call or direct mail piece, with the hopes of getting booked at a future show.

A second way is to be “hired” by the producer of the show as a strolling magician working the entire floor. I put the word hired in quotes, because you will probably not be paid. Most likely you will have used the strategy discussed in Volume One – bartering your talents as a strolling magician at the show in exchange for a free membership to the organization. This is more likely to happen for a business-to-consumer show, since the producer will then promote your appearance as a way to help draw people to the show.

This method can be a very effective showcase for your talents. You are still prospecting in hopes of landing a client for future shows, but you have more credibility because you are sanctioned by the producer of the show. In addition, you will receive lots of free publicity.

A third way of breaking into your local trade show is to approach local businesses that will be exhibiting there and pitch your services several months before the show. You can find out who will be exhibiting in a couple of ways that I discuss in the course and on the CD.

Gain some experience working locally, developing and polishing your trade show act before you go after one of the big national shows. At that level you are competing with some of the top trade show magicians in the business and it is not a place to break in your act. As Michael Ammar once observed, "Everybody needs someplace to be bad." Start locally, then, if your act works, opportunities to move up to regional and/or national shows will appear.

Good luck.

Jim
Jim Snack

"Helping Magicians Succeed with Downloadable Resources"
www.success-in-magic.com
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