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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » Favorite art (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Tom Bartlett
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The illustrator N.C. Wyeth is one of my favorite artists, a visionary with a unique style that’s easily recognizable. The sad part he was shunned by academia until after his death and then was discovered as a artist and his son Andrew become famous in my opinion, only because of his fathers art connections. Andrew can't carry N.C. brushes!

My favorite style is impressionist, but the older I get the more I would like to have a Norman Rockwell.

I can’t afford any of the originals and I will not hang a print, unless it is an etching, so I collect good art by people that are not famous, yet! There is a Guy Wiggins here in Tulsa, it is a winter cityscape for around $25,000 if my ship comes in.
Our friends don't have to agree with me about everything and some that I hold very dear don't have to agree about anything, except where we are going to meet them for dinner.
Chrystal
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I used to collect lithographs mainly of animals and I especially loved anything depicting wolves. Like Doug, I like Robert Bateman. I have a couple of his lithos and for those not familiar with him, he's a West Coast naturalist whose main areas of art is of nature and animals.

I also have two lithograph of some of James Daly's work. One of his lithographs which shows immigrant families after they arrived in New York sits in my living room, I still love it even tho I purchased it as a teen when I recieved an income tax refund. Like that's ever going to happen again!

Over the years my taste have changed however, and I found myself drawn to one piece that was being showcased in a Café for local artist. The artist wasn't known but that didn't matter to me as they say you should only buy something because you love it. The large painting was of Jazz singers in hues of blue. I keep going back and looking at it and perhaps can buy it one day if I save my pennies.

I also love, love , kids art. I currently work at an Inner City School and often get cards and drawings from students. I usually laminate, frame and display the art at my place or at school.

I really like all types of art work and probably have the soul of an artist.

Chrystal
pepka
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Uh, I'm the one on the right.
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My home is decorated with a variety of magic and movie prints. My favorite 2 are the huge print of Rene' Lavand that hangs over my fireplace, and Chung Ling Soo, gift from the Gods. I also own a pretty rare print of Vernon that combines his 2 famous "looking at the ace of clubs" photos. One was taken when he was young, and one older. This print is a mixed media piece that combines both. One side he's old, the other young. The artist had to stop making them as he did not have the rights to reproduce Vernon's image. My favorite painting ever is "Starry Night" by Van Gogh. That, and Dogs Playing Poker.
Patrick Differ
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Huge fan of the Impressionists, here. Light, brush strokes, space and time. Anything sculpture. And the frescoes in the Sistine Chapel absolutely left me speechless.
Will you walk into my parlour? said the Spider to the Fly,
Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy;
The way into my parlour is up a winding stair,
And I've a many curious things to show when you are there.

Oh no, no, said the little Fly, to ask me is in vain,
For who goes up your winding stair
-can ne'er come down again.
kregg
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I'm a huge fan of Motherwell, Klein, and Jasper Johns. But, I prefer buying art from contemporaries that I don't have to insure ... yet. Smile
I like all of the art that my wife and I have collected throughout our travels, otherwise I wouldn't have dropped a dime on them. My collection includes George Rodrigue, Bellet, Rina Lyampe (earlier oil still life's), Nancy Chabon, Jean Pattou, Jan Harrison, Alina Maksimenko and (unapologetically) yours truly.
Eastern block countries are turning out a lot of talent these days, as is China. I also like David Oleski's and Pino's work.
POOF!
Sorceress
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Kregg,
Do you have an art background yourself, or are you and your wife involved in the art community so that you know what to buy?
A lot of so called "Contemporary Art" is a big hoax and if you are buying for investment it can be at a big loss.

I compared costs among 50 Sotheby catalogs.
Contemporary works by artists born in 1960's or 1970"s have prices ranging between $100,000 and $1,000,000, while artists born in 1860'S or 1870'S usually have a price range of $10,000 to $100,000. Certainly famous painters like Picasso, Kandinsky etc have a higher price of US$300,000 to US$3,000,000 on average.
 
You get a tax deduction, if you donate the art to a university or a charity foundation, you get tax deduction again. You buy a $500,000 painting from a living painter, Under the table, the painter may really get only $50,000. So your cost is $50,000. But your tax deduction is more than $50,000. The seller and the buyer both know that the painting is just nothing, crap.
 
As far as reproductions go, you are correct a lot of good stuff IS coming out of China. In fact, if you buy from a very large reproduction, say between 60 to 85 inches X 40 to 60 inches, of an old Master from the late 1800's directly from the best talent in China, it wll cost you between $1,000-$5000. (You have to know who to do the work.) But if you buy the painting after it has been painted in China by the best talent and sent to the NY or California artist, who simply signs it with HIS name, and then sells it to you, it will cost you between $12,000 and $20,000, depending on the size and the Old Master you choose. I actually know quite a bit about this! If you don't a very good and extensive background in art where you have a very good trained eye, and might actually be able to recognize emerging talent that may one day be BIG, then I think it is a dangerous proposition.   
Tom Bartlett
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I think it a shame when people by art like they buy stocks and bonds, especially by living artist from other countries, even the best artistic eyes are not going to be able to pick the next Blanchard or Pizarro.

There are so many great artists in America that are not well known and you can find their art at estate sales all across the U.S some times for as little as 10 percent of the apprised value and if you have an eye for art and do a little homework you can even buy some very good painting on eBay. There have been several paintings by Emile A. Gruppe’ that have sold for less than $10,000, if they where in a gallery they would ask $25,000 to $50,000 for the same ones. This is just one example of dead artist that can still be bought at reasonable prices trough privet sales and auctions, but you do have to know art.
Our friends don't have to agree with me about everything and some that I hold very dear don't have to agree about anything, except where we are going to meet them for dinner.
Sorceress
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I like the way you think Tom. I haven't familiarized myself with your favorites yet because I am still thinking about Cocaine Cowboys (godfather thread). The film made quite an impression on me. Most banks in the US at the time were dealing with about 12 million dollars, but the banks in Miami in the 1980's were all handling in excess of $500 Million, and there were MANY banks. From the movie, it almost seemed like one per block! I am having trouble thinking about art. Plus it is supposed to snow tomorrow with 40 mph winds so we have the day off from working on the bldg after my husband gets home from work.
Sorceress
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The best artist's eyes are often able to recognize the next GREAT artist, you just can't buy art EXPECTING it to later command BIG dollars because it may not happen, because I think there is a lot of hoax and politics involved too. But it is possible to recognize greatness if you are trained and knowledgeable, I think.
Sorceress
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Tom, one of my relatives recognized Jackson Pollock when his paintings were only $10,000
Eddie Torres
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The very awesome Alex Ross and just recently Gabriele Dell’Otto .

Eddie
Eddie Ivan Torres
rawdawg
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Caravaggio, Degas, John Singer Sargent, Albrecht Dürer, et al.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:The_Cardsharps.jpg
One time, when I was young, I botched a sleight so bad, Vernon, Marlo & Miller rolled over in their graves. But I didn't see Elmsley, probably because he was behind the others.
Sorceress
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Love the chiaroscuro of Caravaggio! Thank you for linking us, Rawdawg. I love Dürer, and Dégas, especially since I have a ballet background, and Sargeant. I love the Old Masters, too. It is so hard to limit oneself, isn't it!
Steve_Mollett
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Quote:
On 2008-10-23 19:26, Sorceress wrote:
Frazetta I had to look up too. Very talented. His work, like Egyptian Queen, reminds me a little of Jean Léon Géróme. Do you know him, Steve?

No, but now I'll have to look him up.
Author of: GARROTE ESCAPES
The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth.
- Albert Camus
Steve_Mollett
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Quote:
On 2008-10-23 23:16, Sorceress wrote:
Rodin! We have one in our local museum and what a genius! Yes, I love "The Thinker". I would love to see the Burghers of Calais and other statues by Rodin. I love art!
Thank you for sharing!


And Houdon.
Author of: GARROTE ESCAPES
The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth.
- Albert Camus
Tom Bartlett
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Quote:
On 2008-10-26 05:27, Sorceress wrote:
Tom, one of my relatives recognized Jackson Pollock when his paintings were only $10,000



When Pollock paintings were $10,000: it would be like paying in excess of a $100,000 to day.

Pollock was famous more by association than for what he painted. He was part of the in crowd. If he had not been married to Thomas Hart Benton's Daughter no one would have ever known who he was.

It is the same for Andrew Wyeth if he had not been the son of N.C. Wyeth he would not be famous either.

Both Jackson Pollock and Andrew Wyeth are only successful because of marketing and no other reason exist, at best they are both mediocre artist.
Our friends don't have to agree with me about everything and some that I hold very dear don't have to agree about anything, except where we are going to meet them for dinner.
Tom Bartlett
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Quote:
On 2008-10-26 09:39, Steve_Mollett wrote:
Quote:
On 2008-10-23 19:26, Sorceress wrote:
Frazetta I had to look up too. Very talented. His work, like Egyptian Queen, reminds me a little of Jean Léon Géróme. Do you know him, Steve?

No, but now I'll have to look him up.


Frazetta original paintings are very pricey: Are you saying you have original painting by Frazetta or photo graphic reproductions in other words prints?
Our friends don't have to agree with me about everything and some that I hold very dear don't have to agree about anything, except where we are going to meet them for dinner.
Destiny
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The Australian Government purchased Jackson Pollock's Blue Poles for 2 million dollars in 1973 and I still remember the outcry as it was the most ever paid, at that time, for a modern painting.

It is now valued at between 100 and 150 million.

I saw it at the Sydney Opera House in the mid seventies. It was quite beautiful and very interesting but I fail to see what made it worth so much.

Destiny
Tom Bartlett
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Jackson Pollock is one of the most successful hoaxes ever perpetrated on the art world and the buyers are his whiting accomplices. They are like the rich man that gets duped in to paying millions for a fake, but tells no one because they don’t want to look stupid and foolish. He was the Thomas Kincaid of his time, only with even less talent if that's possible.
Our friends don't have to agree with me about everything and some that I hold very dear don't have to agree about anything, except where we are going to meet them for dinner.
RicHeka
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I was fortunate to purchase one of the limited edition prints[1250]by Scott Gustafson of 'Merlin and Arthur'.[Now Sold Out]

It is a beautiful work.I alway's seem to find something hidden that I wasn't aware of before.

I had it professionally framed,and it is on a wall in my living room.

http://tinyurl.com/6boxfl

Rich
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