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Destiny
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I am emceeing and performing at a local artists Exhibition opening this coming Friday night.

http://underart.com.au/

Destiny
Tom Bartlett
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Quote:
On 2008-10-26 14:54, plasticdestiny wrote:
I am emceeing and performing at a local artists Exhibition opening this coming Friday night.

http://underart.com.au/

Destiny


I liked the "intimate" the best the rest was just good interior decorating stuff.
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Tom Bartlett
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I would like to clear something up. First there is nothing wrong with collecting prints, posters or Beanie Babies but it is not the same thing as collecting art!

A modern print of an oil, acrylic, or water color painting is like me doing a bronze sculpture and selling you a picture of it, you are not buying art you are buying a picture of it! The picture may even become valuable but it is still not art!

There are lots of thing that people collect that bring a lot of money, but that does not or ever will make it art. Magic posters are a good example of prints that have become quite valuable but they are still only limited reproductions of some ones original art and not the art itself.
Our friends don't have to agree with me about everything and some that I hold very dear don't have to agree about anything, except where we are going to meet them for dinner.
Destiny
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Quote:
I liked the "intimate" the best the rest was just good interior decorating stuff.


Totally agree.

In fact the artist has been quite open with me that she paints that stuff to look good with the decor in wealthy peoples houses.

The 'intimate' actually incorporates items of lingeree, with so much paint when you look at it you wonder whether there is a bra in the painting or it's just your imagination. A gimmick for sure - but a clever one.

I am looking forward to the job on Friday.

Destiny
Sorceress
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Tom, have you actually studied art because Pollock did not just drip paint on the canvas without a plan or the eye of a very talented artist. There IS Method to it. And you are correct that my relative found Pollock a LONG time ago. I think he was born about 100 years ago. I don't agree with your opinion on Pollock. `
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Congratulations Destiny! I wish I could come see you!
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Géromé was a very talented Orientalist of the late 1800's. One of his paintings that really surprised me recently is of a building somewhere in the middle east WITH Decapitated Heads on pikes on the front, sort of giving you the flavor of what has been a way of fighting (like back in the middle ages) for a long time.
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Tom, my question was about what art people LIKE, not necessarily own. I wanted to know about specific pieces or periods or anything else that is found appealing.
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I bought a scale replica of Rodin's "Hand of God" for my parents for Christmas one year. Whenever I look at it, I realize how much of a genius Rodin was. I do go in for the classical and renaissance more than abstract modern art (like Picasso.) While Picasso's a master, I prefer more realiztic looking modern art.

I'm slightly ashamed to admit that the prints hanging on my walls were selected mostly because the colors were complimentary to the decor, rather than because they hold any significance. If it were up to me, I'd be displaying prints by H.R. Giger- so it's probably a good thing my wife has a decorative veto. I do have a Hildebrant print of the Fellowship of the Rings in my study, though. And I'm finishing up constructing a custom frame to display a poster print from Paul Osborne. (No, it's not an actual illusion- no secrets are given away.)

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Tom Bartlett
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Quote:
On 2008-10-26 16:44, Sorceress wrote:
Tom, have you actually studied art because Pollock did not just drip paint on the canvas without a plan or the eye of a very talented artist. There IS Method to it. And you are correct that my relative found Pollock a LONG time ago. I think he was born about 100 years ago. I don't agree with your opinion on Pollock. `
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Congratulations Destiny! I wish I could come see you!
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Géromé was a very talented Orientalist of the late 1800's. One of his paintings that really surprised me recently is of a building somewhere in the middle east WITH Decapitated Heads on pikes on the front, sort of giving you the flavor of what has been a way of fighting (like back in the middle ages) for a long time.
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Tom, my question was about what art people LIKE, not necessarily own. I wanted to know about specific pieces or periods or anything else that is found appealing.


Yes I have studied art for fifty years; I wasted the first 3 years.

Pollock was the bad boy of the art world and they loved him for it. He was a celebrity and it made his art sell. The articles written about him, by his friends and published in major magazine of the day, catapulted him far beyond his talent. Pollock was the buzzword in the art world like any buzz word in marketing it works.

Jackson Pollock was born January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956. His first accidental art was about 1945 that was hardly 100 years ago. He made great decorator painting they went with most décors. Yes in the late 1940s $10,000 would be a great deal more than $100,000 more like they paid $250,000. You must come from a very wealthy family. It’s alright to have an opinion that is different than mine, but I do hope you will extend me the same courtesy.
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Forget it Bartlett. Privies revoked.
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Tom Bartlett
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Sorry for my rant, it is just that I have seen great artist overlook and passed by for those that have no talent but have better marketing skills. Many end up having to take jobs that won’t even allow them the opportunity to paint as a hobby, as they only make enough to provide for their families needs, wile some mediocre but business savvy artist becomes a household word at least the flavor of the month.
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Bill Palmer
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Quote:
On 2008-10-26 16:23, Tom Bartlett wrote:
I would like to clear something up. First there is nothing wrong with collecting prints, posters or Beanie Babies but it is not the same thing as collecting art!

A modern print of an oil, acrylic, or water color painting is like me doing a bronze sculpture and selling you a picture of it, you are not buying art you are buying a picture of it! The picture may even become valuable but it is still not art!

There are lots of thing that people collect that bring a lot of money, but that does not or ever will make it art. Magic posters are a good example of prints that have become quite valuable but they are still only limited reproductions of some ones original art and not the art itself.


Some art is produced strictly to be distributed as prints. Currier and Ives are good examples of that. So are the engravings of Albrecht Dürer. You may prefer acrylics, oils, pencil sketches or whatever, but when you have a series of limited edition litho prints, signed by the artist, such as Picasso often did, you have a valuable piece of art, not just as an investment, but as an artwork, per se.

BTW, Sorceress said Pollock was BORN about 100 years ago, not that he did his paintings that long ago. He was born in 1912. This year is 2008. Do the math. That's 96 years. That's ALMOST 100 years.
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Tom Bartlett
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Bill,

Yes etchings, engravings and stone lithography are real art! The artist applies his talent directly to the plates or stone, they are only good for a limited number of prints. They are made by the artist hand and that’s what makes them art.

The digitized and photographic prints like that of Kincaid, that can be printed in an unlimited amount are not.
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Destiny
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There is ample evidence in this thread that a poster can just be a poor copy of the real thing.

I remember at high school we would cut out bits of magazines and paste them to a poster to illustrate an idea. Now one sees posters who cut and paste a whole life story and identity for themselves.

I am again reminded of Emily Howard.

Destiny
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Just think Plastic, you should be recieving the 'real' thing about now if you haven't got 'them' already. Smile

Tom brings up so many great points, I wish I had time to get into them.

One aspect that is rarely covered in Tom's line of thinking about real vs printed art is the Animation Art...these days almost ALL are serigraph reproductions (I still have numerous originals), are just pictures of pictures...but there is another astonishing aspect to an original hand painted Cel from a motion picture...let's say you have a cel of Donald Duck...you not only have the art work representing Donald you have in your hand the ACTUAL Star himself that actually performed. It's like having a 'slice' of Cary Grant. Smile I have Fred Flintstone looking at me right now. Not a picture of Fred mind you but the REAL Fred who appeared on the film, on screen...as real as he ever was or could be...get my drift?

fun fun fun.

I once (while collecting fine art years ago,) had a few small etchings by Renoir. Beautiful stuff.
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Destiny
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Just think Plastic, you should be recieving the 'real' thing about now if you haven't got 'them' already.


Doug,

I bought myself a new car for my birthday at the end of September - now if the heads arrive it'll feel like it's Christmas already.

Destiny
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Mailed on the 14th I think. Smile
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Magritte, Escher (Relativity), Dali, Frida Kahlo... I frankly like most "pretty" colored surrealist stuff. I had a ballroom class with a young lady who had the Persistence of Memory tattooed on her forearm. Talk about body art!

There was an artist I learned about in high school, can't remember the name. But one work was a photograph of bright red foxes in a purple restaurant. Does anyone know who I am talking about? AH! I should have kept in touch with my teacher!
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Sorceress
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Tom,
Yes, I didn't mean that Jackson Pollock's paintings were $10,000 one hundred years ago. And yes, I have a REAL Problem with people jumping all over MY opinions so of Course I allow you yours, I think I only said that I disagree with your assessment. I agree with you basically and said so when I discusses the whole art biz and prices. I just disagree about Pollock and it is because I have actually Painted and studied art all my life and know that a canvas is like a sculpture and is viewed and created from all angles, or in the case of canvas, as though it were made on a grid with each grid fitting in with the other grids and deliberately causing the viewer's eyes to flow around the painting in specific ways. I think Jackson Pollock achieved this and that is in part why I believe he is recognized as one of the greats.
I guess a better way of explaining what I mean is by this example: If you have 3 rows of 7 framed photographs on the wall, it would be like a GRID on a canvas in some ways. Now if you take the top row extreme left hand side frame and tilted it OUT - that is, so the top of the frame is tilted towards the left, THAT would be wrong in a painting because you want the eye to flow Around a painting, so if the Frame were the upper left hand corner of a great painting, you would have it with the BOTTOM leaning out towards the left and the top of the frame leaning IN. Maybe the next frame leans out on the top TOWARDS the first one. Do you understand? ARTISTS actually paint with all the sections on the canvas having a certain flow so that your eye goes from here to here to here and NOT off the painting but stays IN the painting. Jackson Pollock did this and other things like this, with layers of paint dripped on the canvas.
Since you bring up my families wealth, let me just say that I sort of got the impression that your opinion might actually come from you being the BUYER and having the Art SELLERS telling you what you want to hear, or agreeing with you to sell to you. I mean, if you are very opinionated (as we both are) and your study of art for 50 years comes from years at the galleries, some opinions might be reinforced because you are a potential buyer. Afterall, when you have a lot of money or spend a lot in one store, they are awfully nice to you, almost like best friends!
---I think it is ok to give my opinion about this because I told you about My family and the artist and then you slammed the artist and my own and my relative's taste. After that I felt fine being HONEST and open about MY opinion TOO.
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