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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Polly wants a cracker... » » rabbit from hat (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

DJ Trix
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I was wondering if anybody knew the history on the effect rabbit from hat. I was going to have a custom hat made but wanted to know who was the first person to ever perform this marvel.
dj Smile
calgarianpimp
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I read a couple weeks ago that a guy named didi or d-d ripped a rabbit's head off and put it back on after he made it appear from a hat, happened about 100 B.C. There's written stuff about it in hyroglyphics if you know what I mean. Smile thanks for reading
DJ Trix
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hhaahahahaah...

Were there hats in 100 B.C.?

That sounds quite funny.
Harry Murphy
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Magicians have produced animals since the beginning of magic.

However, John Henry Anderson (1814-74), the "Great Wizard of the North," is often credited with inventing the system of producing a rabbit out of a top hat. It was a featured trick in his shows and much imitated in his day. It came to be the trick associated with magic of that period (and to some extent, is still the popular image of a magician today). He always used a borrowed top hat (but then those were common in those times!).

Dedi did not pull the head off a rabbit. Westcar Papyrus, an ancient Egyptian document now in the Berlin State Museum, describes Dedi’s act.

The Papyrus discusses the exploits of King Cheops, builder of the Great Pyramid at Giza sometime around 2600 BC. Cheops, in the Papyrus, calls upon his sons to bring to him a magician of the time known as Dedi. Dedi, so the story goes, then pays a visit to the court of King Cheops to perform a few magical miracles for him.

Supposedly 70 years old (which in itself was a great trick for the day!), Dedi showed the Pharaoh what, even by today's standards, would be considered impressive tricks. According to the Papyrus, he performed three decapitations of animals.

Dedi did pull the head off the duck and goose, and he did pass the blade of a sword through the neck of an ox without harming it. Perhaps he was using the first sword thru neck on the market! He subsequently restored the slaughtered beasts to their living states, none the worse for the wear.

When asked by Cheops to perform the same feat with a man, Dedi refused. Dawes seems to think that this is an indication of the fact that Dedi did not have the gimmickry or apparatus on hand to perform such a feat.

Now that's more than you wanted to know!
The artist formally known as Mumblepeas!
DJ Trix
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Well thank you.

Was the effect David Blaine did with the chicken the same method used by dedi, or is it unknown to everyone?

Thanks very much.
Harry Murphy
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The "secret" is fairly well known and has been around in writing almost forever. I suspect that the Dedi method was probably considered old in Dedi’s time! You'll find that it has been written up in some of the earliest magic books.

Yes, I believe that it is the same method that Blaine did on one of his specials.

Heck, my dad was not a magician and not interested in things magical, but grew up on a farm in east Texas. He used to gross my brothers and me out by pulling the head off a chicken and chasing us around the yard with the headless beastie. He would then restore the chicken’s head and let it wander away again. My brothers and I knew it was a gag, but screamed in delightful fear nevertheless (one has to humor their parent! Yes?).

This trick works best on “city folk” who don’t know the nature of animals (birds). Most farmers who raise chickens know how to do this little gag (and they see it as a gag not a magic trick). You should have heard my uncle howl with laughter when he described Blaine doing the bit. My poor uncle actually watches TV! (Hey, at 78, what’s left to do?)

Honestly, I have not seen any of the Blaine TV things. I watched some of the filming of one in New York City for the second one, but never got to see it on the tube. I’ll probably get around to seeing what all the uproar is about one of these days.

I suspect that Dedi knew that the Pharaoh and his court didn’t go around playing with chickens, ducks or cows, and so managed to fool them with some rather simple methodologies! What’s science and husbandry to one, is magic to another!
The artist formally known as Mumblepeas!
DJ Trix
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wow,

thanks again for all the info

dj
p.b.jones
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Hi,
I could be totally wrong, but, I read somewhere that the rabbit from hat was started/attributed to magic because of a cartoon called Mandrake the magician that was in newspapers. From what I understood, this was a popular cartoon and one of the things that this character was pictured doing was rabbit from hat. After that because of the popularity, magicians were asked about it and therefore he came up with methods for the effect.
Phillip
Harry Murphy
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The Mandrake Comic Strip and later Comic Book and later movie serial/movie post-date the actual top-hat production of a rabbit by about 100 years! It had already become a cliché by the time Mandrake was drawn.

Lee Falk created Mandrake at the age of 19, in 1924, and drew two weeks' worth of strips. Ten years later, he sold it to the King Features Syndicate (King Features Syndicate). Not trusting his own artistic ability, he brought in commercial artist Phil Davis to draw it. Falk's tightly plotted stories kept the strip lively for decades, but much of its early success is due to Davis's smooth, clean rendering, reminiscent of the contemporary art deco movement. Mandrake's tuxedo virtually shone of its own light, and the same could be said of his fashionably slicked-down hair. Davis died in 1964. His replacement, Harold "Fred" Fredericks Jr., initially adopted Davis's style, and few readers noticed the changeover. Fredericks continues to draw the strip today, but has gradually, over the years, let his own style emerge.

Man oh man, do I need to get a life!
The artist formally known as Mumblepeas!
Zack
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What *I* had heard was that the rabbit in hat was originally a reference to one Mary Toft, the woman who gave birth to rabbits.

here's the story:
By Michael Woods
Scripps Howard News Service


Another April Fool? A harebrained headline from a supermarket tabloid?
No, it's the strange case of Mary Toft and her rabbit babies, a real-life incident that left a mark on medical history. It was the beginning of the end for an idea about birth defects that seems ridiculous today but was widely believed in the past.

It made Mary Toft a sensation in England in 1726. She got a whirlwind of media publicity, which promoted her as an object of jokes, shame and national embarrassment. The Toft affair cast England's most famous doctors - not its politicians - in a bad light.

Toft didn't give birth to a rabbit. She had at least 16, according to her doctors.

When the remarkable events occurred, Toft was 25, married and working as a servant in Godalming, England. Despite a miscarriage in August, Toft still seemed pregnant. She went into apparent labor and Dr. John Howard, the local medico, arrived to assist.

To Howard's astonishment, she delivered one rabbit, then another and another - all born dead. Still she seemed pregnant.

Howard dispatched letters to England's greatest doctors and scientists asking for help to investigate the sensation. Among those who hurried to Godalming were Nathaniel St. Andre, surgeon-anatomist to King George I, and Richard Manningham, the most famous obstetrician in London.

Toft gave birth to more dead rabbits in their presence.

Yes, there were hints of something amiss. The rabbits, for instance, had no umbilical cords - the lifelines that connect a fetus to its mother's blood supply. Toft never delivered the placentas, or "afterbirth" that attaches to the umbilical cord.

Tests on some of the rabbits showed air in their lungs, meaning they had breathed air before dying.

Nevertheless, St. Andre declared the births genuine, and published his findings as the long-sought proof for the hypothesis of "maternal impressions."

Toft claimed that during pregnancy she had an intense craving for roast rabbit. She tried to catch rabbits in the garden, admired them in the village market, dreamed about rabbits.

St Andre moved Toft to an elegant apartment in London, where she became a social sensation. Cable TV news talk-show producers would have clamored to sign her on.

Toft also became the center of a debate among scientists and philosophers about maternal impressions.

Material impressions was medicine's explanation for birth defects. It contended that a pregnant woman's experiences could be imprinted directly on the fetus.

Moms startled by a loud sound during pregnancy might give birth to a child with hearing impairments. If a child is born with a red birth mark, that's because mom picked strawberries during pregnancy. Look at a blind person, and your baby may be born blind.

The maternal-impressions hypothesis took a big hit when Toft's story unraveled. First, villagers confessed that they supplied her with baby rabbits. Then Toft admitted that she planted dead rabbits for the doctors to discover.

Her motive: Fame and fortune from selling her story.

St. Andre and other backers of the hypothesis became national laughingstocks. But lessons from Troth's rabbit babies faded, and the maternal-impressions notion lived on. Doctors used it as an explanation for birth defects throughout the 19th century.

Joseph Merrick blamed his condition on an incident in which Mom was almost trampled by an elephant during pregnancy. Merrick, immortalized as "The Elephant Man," was disfigured by a disease called Proteus Syndrome.

Even in the 20th century, women in some countries tried to avoid looking at individuals with physical disabilities or birthmarks, for fear of harming their unborn child.
DJ Trix
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In my honest opinion that is really quite sick..

I guess some would do anything for a little publicity..
Bob Sanders
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Not a story to follow with:

Happy Easter!
Bob Sanders

Magic By Sander / The Amazed Wiz

AmazedWiz@Yahoo.com
TrickyRicky
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Zack is correct.
I have read that story before.
I also thought it was nonsense. But in those days those were the kind of stories people would dwell on.
Richard.
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