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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Food for thought » » The Seminal Texts of Magic 1 (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

cinemagician
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I am re-organizing my library which I started re-building about three years ago, after selling off most of my magic books around 1997 (during my latientcy period Smile).

Will you Help me to add to my collection/ want list as well as chronilogically organize what I have?

As a fun excerise, what would you consider to be the seminal texts of magic dating from 1584 to 1938?

Since I have copies of the two below I though it might be interesting to consider them as the "bookends" of a great early collection of magic books.

I'll start it off-- you fill in the blanks. All in fun- Mark

1584 -Scotts Discouverie of Magic

1938-Greater Magic


O.K. I'll add another between the "bookends" anyone want to contribute?

1584- Scotts Discouverie of Witchcraft

1634- Hocus Pocus Jr.

1938- Greater Magic
...The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity...

William Butler Yeats
tommy
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Our Magic
by Nevil Maskelyne & David Devant

1911 an important source book on the theory of magic.

Expert at Card Table
by S W Erdnase

1902 a classic treatise on card manipulation.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
cinemagician
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Yes Tom, agreed updating the list-

1584- Scotts Discouverie of Witchcraft

1634- Hocus Pocus Jr.

1902- Expert at the Card Table

1911- Our Magic

1938- Greater Magic
...The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity...

William Butler Yeats
Bill Hallahan
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I wouldn't call all of the books I list below "seminal books of magic," but by posting a straw man bibliography, others can comment. I own a copy of many of these books, although I own only a few of the early ones, and of course I own modern copies of those, not the original publications.

I listed some works that were published after 1938 if the author had published a magic book by 1938.

Most of the earlier book on the list were from The Private Library - The Quarterly Journal of the Private Libraries Association - Number 26 - April 1963, in the article "A Magical Library: I" by Trevor H. Hall, who was describing his own library. Some of the books are so rare that only one copy is known to exist. Additional titles were added to the list based on additional research, or because they were in my own library.

There are many early works that are relevant to the art of magic that are not listed, i.e. Thomas Betson, a Middlesex monk, wrote about IT in his notebook in roughly 1490, or Pietro Aretino's Dialogo di Pietro Aretino nel qvale si parla del gioco con moralita piacevole described a holdout in 1543. (Source: Magic Lineage Project). However, those books are not about magic. I did include a few autobiographies of historical figures who are related to either magic or deception.

Of course, this list is incomplete.

If you find any errors, corrections, additions, or you can supply the years that are missing, then please let me know, and I'll update the list.

Early Magic Book List

  • A brief and pleasaunt treatise, entituled, natural and artificial conclusions – (1581) Thomas Hill
  • The discoverie of witchcraft by Reginald Scot (1584)
  • Clever and Pleasant Inventions (1584) - J. Prevost (In French in 1584, translated to English in 1998).
  • Mathematicall Recreations (1633, 1653, and 1674) - Van Etten
  • Hocus Pocus Junior The Anatomie Of Of Legerdemain (1634)
  • The Mysteryes of Nature and Art (fourth edition, 1654) - Bate
  • A Candle in the Dark (1655) - Ady
  • Magia natvralis libri viginti or Natural Magick (English 1658 and 1669) - John Baptista Porta
  • Recreations Mathematiques et Physiques (1693)
  • Round About Our Coal Fire: or, Christmas Entertainmolts (circa 1700)
  • Hocus Pocus: or, A Rich Cabinet of Legerdemain Curiosities (circa 1700) - White
  • Arts Improvement:or, Choice Experiments (1703) - Snow
  • Art's Treasury - (year?) White
  • Recreations Mathematical and Physical (1708) – Ozanam (translation of 1693 book?)
  • Rareties and Curious Inventions (circa 1710)
  • The Old Hocus Pocus (circa 1710)
  • Legerdemain: or, Natural and Artificial Conclusions and Hocus Pocus Improved (1710) – Thomas Hill’s work rereleased (rewritten?)
  • The Merry Companion, or Delights for the Ingenious (1721) - Richard Neve
  • Hocus Pocus: or, The Cabinet of Legerdemain Curiosities Broke Open (1721) - Richard Neve
  • The Whole Art of Legerdemain (1722) - Dean
  • Physical Amusements and Diverting Experiments (1784) - Pinetti
  • Rational Recreations (1774 and 1787) - Hooper
  • Breslaw's Last Legacy (1784)
  • Natural Magic: or Physical Amusernents Revealed (1785) - Astley
  • The Conjurer Unmasked (1785 and 1788) - Denton
  • The Conjurer's Repository (1795)
  • Hocus Pocus, or, The Art of Conjuration (1795)
  • The Conjurer Unmasked, or the Magical Mirror (1795)
  • Cabinet of Knowledge (1796 and 1808) - Gale
  • An Evening's Amusement, The Merry Thought; An Excellent and Right-Merry Collection of Capital Tricks (circa 1800)
  • The Expositor or Many Mysteries Unravelled (1805) - William Frederick Pinchbeck (This is the first conjuring book published in the U.S.A.)
  • The New Art of Hocus Pocus Revived (1808)
  • The Petit Sorcerer, or, The Conjurer Unmasked (1808)
  • The London Conjurer (1812) (only 36 pages)
  • Hocus Pocus, or, the New and Complete Art of Conjuring (circa 1820)
  • The Modern Conjuror, or, Complete Guide to Sleight of Hand (1822)
  • The Art of Conjuring Made Easy (1822) (24 pages)
  • The Universal Conjurer (1829)
  • The Whole Art of Legerdemain (1829).
  • The Juggler's Oracle, or, the Whole Art of Legerdemain Laid Open (circa 1830)
  • Fireside Amusements (Edinburgh, 1850). (188 pages)
  • Magical Recreations, or The Whole Art of Legerdernaiiz; Explained and Made Easy for all capacities (Bristol, circa 1850)
  • Nouvelle Magie Blanche Dévoilée or New White Magic Explained and Complete Course of Prestigitation (1854) - J.N. Ponsin
  • Memoirs of Robert-Houdin (1859 - first U.S. Edition) - Jean Eugene Robert-Houdin (Translated to English from French).
  • Éclairez les dupes, il n'y aura plus de fripons.", which is The Sharper Deteced And Exposed (year?) - Jean Eugene Robert-Houdin
  • Modern Magic (1876) - Professor Hoffmann (Angelo Lewis)
  • Les Secrets de la Prestidigitation et de la Magie, which is Secrets Of Conjuring And Magic (1877) - Jean Eugene Robert-Houdin
  • Sleight of Hand by Edwin Sachs, (1877)
  • Conjuror Dick (1885) - Professor Hoffmann (Angelo Lewis)
  • 40 Years A Gambler On The Mississippi (1887) - George Devol
  • More Magic (1890) - Professor Hoffmann (Angelo Lewis)
  • Magical Experiments (1892) - Arthur Good (Translated to English from French)
  • 'Sharps And Flats' (1894) John Neville Maskelyne
  • The Modern Wizard (1896) - A. Roterberg
  • Latter Day Tricks (1896) - A. Roterberg
  • New Era Card Tricks (1897) - A. Roterberg
  • 20 Years a Fakir (1899) - S. James Weldon
  • Modern Coin Manipulation (1900?) T. Nelson Downs
  • The Art of Modern Conjuring (year?) - Anonymous
  • The Magician's Handbook (1901) - Selbit
  • Magic (1901) - Ellis Stanyon
  • The Modern Conjuror and Drawing Room Entertainer (1902) - C. Lang Neil
  • Artifice, Ruse and Subterfuge at the Card Table: A Treatise on the Science and Art of Manipulating Cards (1902) - Later published as The Expert At The Card Table.
  • Card Tricks and how to do them (1902) - A. Roterberg
  • Modern Magicians Hand Book (1902) - William J. Hilliar
  • Howard Thurston's Card Tricks (1903) - Howard Thurston
  • Later Magic (1904) - Professor Hoffmann (Angelo Lewis)
  • The Art of Magic (1906) T. Nelson Downs, edited by Hilliard
  • Entertaining By Magic (1906) - Hermann Pallme
  • Tricks & Illusions (1908) - Will Goldston
  • Quality Magic (year?) - OKito
  • The Unmasking of Robert-Houdin (1906) - Harry Houdini (Eric Weiss)
  • Magicians' Tricks and How They Are Done (1910) - Henry Hatton and Adrian Plate
  • Magical Titbits (1911) - Professor Hoffmann (Angelo Lewis)
  • Our Magic (1911) - John Nevil Maskelyne and David Devant
  • Latest Magic (1918) - Professor Hoffmann (Angelo Lewis)
  • Vaudeville Mind Reading (1920) - David J. Lustig
  • Some Card Effects and Magical Talks (1919) - Geo DeLawrence
  • Magical Rope Ties & Escapes (1920) - Harry Houdini (Eric Weiss)
  • Elliott's Last Legacy (1923) - Harry Houdini (Eric Weiss)
  • Paper Magic (1923) - Will Blyth
  • Forty Years in & Around Magic (1923) - Harry Leat
  • Margery" the Medium Exposed (1924) - Harry Houdini (Eric Weiss)
  • 200 Tricks You Can Do (1926) - Howard Thurston
  • 400 Tricks You Can Do (1926) - Howard Thurston
  • 200 More Tricks You Can Do (1927) - Howard Thurston
  • The Magic Art (1920) - Donald Holmes
  • Thirty Card Mysteries (1919) - Charles T. Jordan
  • Ten New Impromptu Card Tricks (1920) - Charles T. Jordan
  • Ten New Pocket Tricks (1920) - Charles T. Jordan
  • Ten new Prepared Card Tricks (1920) - Charles T. Jordan
  • Ten new Sleight of Hand Card Tricks (1920) - Charles T. Jordan
  • The Four Full Hands (1921) - Charles T. Jordan
  • The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion (1922) (No tricks, philosophical treatise - historical error, but first documented the category of "Sympathetic Magic".
  • The Cabinet of Card Miracles (1929) - Theodore Annemann (Later republished as Annemann's Card Miracles)
  • Hofzinser's Card Conjuring (1931) - Johann N. Hofzinser, Reconstituted by Ottokar Fischer, Edited by S. H. Sharpe
  • Test of the Tiber (1932) - Ted Annemann
  • 202 Methods of Forcing (1933) - Ted Annemann
  • En Rapport (year?) - Theodore Annemann
  • 25 One Man Mind Reading Secrets (year?) - U. F. Grant
  • Grant's Illusion Secrets (1934?) - U. F. Grant
  • Practical Mindreading (year?) - William Walker Atkinson
  • Secrets (year?) - U. F. Grant
  • Magical Masterpieces (1934) - Louis Nikola
  • Clever Card Tricks (1934) - Maxwell
  • Card Manipulations (1934) - Jean Hugard
  • Annemann's Complete One Man Mental And Psychic Routine (1935) - Theodore Annemann
  • Mental Magic with Cards (1935) - Jean Hugard
  • Coin Magic (1935) - Jean Hugard
  • Close-Up Magic - For - The Night Club Magician (1938) - Jean Hugard
  • Encyclopedia of Card Tricks (1937) - edited by Jean Hugard
  • Money Magic (1937) - Jean Hugard
  • Silken Sorcery (1937) - Jean Hugard
  • Ponsin on Conjuring (1937) - J.N. Ponsin (A partial translation of Nouvelle Magie Blanche Dévoilée (1854) by S. H. Sharpe; a collection of tricks from that book).
  • More Card Manipulations (1938) - Jean Hugard
  • Ten New Impromptu Card Tricks (1920) - Charles T. Jordan
  • Annemann's Card Magic (1943) - Ted Annemann
  • Annemann's Mental Bargain Effects (year?) - Ted Annemann
  • Annemann's Practical Mental Effects (1944) - Ted Annemann
  • Contact Mind Reading Expanded (1935) - Dariel Fitzkee
  • Greater Magic (1938) - John Northern Hilliard
  • Expert Card Technique (1940) - Jean Hugard and Frederick Braue
  • The Stripper Deck - Miracle Methods No. 1 (year?) - Jean Hugard and Frederick Braue
  • Miracle Methods No. 2: Miracle Shuffles and Tricks (1942) - Jean Hugard and Frederick Braue
  • Miracle Methods No. 3: Prepared Cards and Accessories (1942) - Jean Hugard and Frederick Braue
  • Miracle Methods No. 4: Tricks and Sleights (1943) - Jean Hugard and Frederick Braue
  • Show Stoppers with Cards (year?) - Jean Hugard and Frederick Braue
  • Showmanship for Magicians (1943) - Dariel Fitzkee
  • The Trick Brain (1944) - Dariel Fitzkee
  • Magic by Misdirection (1945?) - Dariel Fitzkee
  • The Invisible Pass (1946) - Jean Hugard and Frederick Braue
  • The Royal Road to Card Magic (1951) - Jean Hugard and Frederick Braue
  • Houdini's Unmasking (1957) - Jean Hugard
Humans make life so interesting. Do you know that in a universe so full of wonders, they have managed to create boredom. Quite astonishing.
- The character of ‘Death’ in the movie "Hogswatch"
tommy
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Yes I am not sure what a "seminal text" is.
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
Lawrence O
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Quote:
On 2009-01-09 01:13, cinemagician wrote:
I am re-organizing my library which I started re-building about three years ago, after selling off most of my magic books around 1997 (during my latientcy period Smile).

Will you Help me to add to my collection/ want list as well as chronilogically organize what I have?

As a fun excerise, what would you consider to be the seminal texts of magic dating from 1584 to 1938?

Since I have copies of the two below I though it might be interesting to consider them as the "bookends" of a great early collection of magic books.

I'll start it off-- you fill in the blanks. All in fun- Mark

1584 -Scotts Discouverie of Magic

1938-Greater Magic


O.K. I'll add another between the "bookends" anyone want to contribute?

1584- Scotts Discouverie of Witchcraft

1634- Hocus Pocus Jr.

1938- Greater Magic

I have gathered more than 50'000 books, booklets, vhs, DVDs... in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Portugese, German and Deutch and had them leather bound a lot of them like works of art so that they could survive me and be enjoyed by other collectors.
During a period covering several years of my life, I did gather rare editions of early magical books ending having many different editions of very rare books. Then I realized that I was more interested in the magic than in the pride of owning rare books.
So my question would be (if I may ask): what are you after?
If the reply is magic, then don't go after rare books.
If the reply is rare books, you're in for some disppointment for the pleasure is in the search and once you have these books and you know their content, a large part of their interest fades away (at least it did for me).

Since Robert Houdin, magic has progressed at an accelerating pace, and the printing capacity or image editing facility has made the production to increase by opening medias to people who could not have accessed it before.

I keep a database covering works (with their © date, authors, illustrators, editors) effects, props, sleights and just keeping it up to date is a real work. When however I want to study an effect, it makes the search much richer and more interesting. You would be surprised by the real evolution that magic keeps on going through. It's fascinating!
You won't see that in antiquarian books (+ the fact that they tend to get stolen).

Naturally, each of us is entitled to pursue his dreams and I'd love to understand yours in more details. By the way the list posted above is extremely thorough (I almost wrote "surprisingly" but it would have been rude towards Bill Hallahan who should be thanked for it).



Further to my post I'd give a sense to seminal books which might be argued and focuses on what makes magic truly magical.

Then here is my list
Alber, Le prestidigitateur. De L’Illusion – Son Mécanisme Psycho Social. Librairie Bloud & Cie, Paris 1909. A strong accent is placed on the psychology of spectators and audiences and the need for performers to take it into consideration.
Ammar, Michael. The Magic of Michael Ammar. 1991 L&L Publishing 306 pages. Chapter 3: Psychology (8 essays): In the Men's Hut (the inner circle); SuperGroup: brainstorming sessions; I've Got Rhythm; The Unspoken Performance (with the Action Zone); Lying: Magic and the art of deception; Get More Rubals from Your Magic; I'm In Training - practice vs. training; Have No Mercy: Push the limits & How to make your magic memorable Audio CD transcribed on chapter 11 of The Magic of Michael Ammar
Ascanio, Arturo de. The Magic of Ascanio Vol 1. Technique, Construction, Cover, Presentation, How to Study Magic, Ascanio's previously unpublished essays, Thoughts on Creativity, Theory Notebook of 1970; Articles on Theory, Conception of the Magical Atmosphere, Analysis of a Trick, On Misdirection, The Fundamentals of Timing, Know Yourself, The Psychology of Palming, The Interviews, Interview with a Genius of Magic, by Juan Tamariz, A Biographical Interview and My Character, by Docampo, Three Juicy Conversations, Arturo and Juan Chat, An Essay by Aurelio Paviato.
Banacheck. Psychological Subtleties Vol 1 & 2. Psychological Subtleties Vol 1 is not a book of tricks and routines, Vol 2 however contains complete routines from professionals who understood the value and impact of the ideas exposed in the Volume 1.
Bannon, John. John Bannon's Smoke and Mirrors. Richard Kaufman & Alan Greenberg, 1991. p 11 Thought provoking comments in the foreword about the surprise element in magic
Beckwith, Tobias. Beyond Deception. Tobias Beckwith offers ideas and techniques which performers at all levels can use to create truly original and personalized magic. Drawing on long experience directing and observing world class performers of all kinds, Beckwith has drawn together not only fascinating theories about how a performer creates, but a series of sure-fire techniques and exercises guaranteed to jumpstart each magician's creative process. It is not only conceptual, but practical giving you exercises that will free your imagination and get you out of your head and into the real world
Binet, Alfred. La Psychologie de la Prestidigitation. Revue des Deux Mondes 15 Octobre 1894 reproduced in L’Illusioniste (in a series of article starting with the No 36 – third year December 1904 p 298.) Alfred Binet is a predominant figure in the early history of Psychology. He wrote a book on attention called L’Attention which is still a reference in modern psychology.
Blosser, P. (1973). Principles of Gestalt psychology and their application to teaching junior high school science. Science Education. 1973.
Booth, John: Extending Magic Beyond Credibility. 2001 L & L Publishing.
Brown, Derren: Pure Effect & Absolute Magic. Derren Brown offers a detailed study of the most difficult task facing any close-up magician: how to make magic convincing. p 9 A moment of your exceptionally valuable time; p 13 Part One – Practical; p 13 Making Contact; p 19 Working With the Spectator...In Mind; p 31 Risk and Delight; p 55 Part Two - Magical Artistry; p 55 Zamiel's Card - Magician removes real cards from an invisible deck to find a selection; p 63 A Three Card Routine - Audience are entertained and exhausted by the magical antics of three cards; p 87 Magicall - cards become a mobile phone and the performer calls a helpline to find the selected card; p 89 Magno Conatu Magnus Nugas - selection of moves, sleights, and assorted nonsense; p 101 Part Three - Direct Mindreading; p 101 Invisible Compromise and an Approach to Mind Reading; p 107 Communicative Subtleties; p 113 You're Supposed to be Reading Minds; p 119 Smoke - thought of card disappears from deck and appears in place of magi's cigarette; p 129 Plerophoria - Spectator fairly shuffles a deck and magi is able to identify every card and any number removed, with his back turned; p 145 Perfect Coin Reading - performer can tell the denomination and date of coin held in spectator's fist w/o ever seeing the coin (dated effect); p 149 Transformation - An intimate, metaphorical routine using numerological readings from cards; p 155 Two Verbal Card Forces - methods for forcing mental selections, using only suggestion and gesture. no cards are used.; p 161 Final Thoughts; p 163 Thank-Yous
Buckley, Arthur: Principles and Deceptions ©1948 Arthur Buckley: 222 pages; p 22 The Principles of Magic; p 25 Manipulation; Substitution; Duplication; Camouflage; p 26 Imitation; False Partition; Concealed Mechanism; Falsification; p 27 Arrangement; Preparation; Misdirection; p 28 Concealment; p 30 The Entertainment Value; p 33 Showmanship; Sleight of Hand; p 34 Something New; p 35 Invention; p 37 Talking Acts Versus Silent Acts, and Pantomine; p 37 The Practice of Leaving the Stage Unattended; p 38 Assistants from the Audience; Fakes and Accessories; p 39 Gimacs; p 40 The Plot; Timing, Rhythm and Pace; p 42 Footwork; p 43 Presenting the Act in Public
Buffaloe, Jimmy: Buffaloed. ©1998 Jim Buffaloe. Edited by Dan Garrett and Phil Willmarth; p 155 One for the Experts - A Four Postulate Analysis: Short essay summarizing the conditioning, routine, clean effect, and ending aspects of the previous effect; p 156 A Perverse (But Effective) Way of Thinking: why the brethren are fooled. Section 2 - General Magic Part 5 – Essays p 158 The Magic In Your Voice: Discussion on rate of speed, controlled breathing, natural resonance, orchestrating your voice, exercises, and being distinct; p 168 The Love Connection: making your show more personable.
Burger, Eugene. Audience involvement a lecture. 1983 & Magic and Meaning with Robert Neale p 1 Conversations: Are Magicians Afraid of Magic? p 4 Magic, Comedy and Mystery; p 6 Magic and the Bizarre; p 9 Finding Ourselves; p 13 The Magical Experience; p 14 Expecting the Unexpected; p 17 Experiencing Surprise; p 17 Experiencing the Impossible p 17 Experiencing the Non-rationnal; p 22 Experiencing the Mystery; p 23 What it Means. p 25 The Shaman's Magic; p 26 Native American Conjuring; p 29 Shamans; p 31 Shamanism and Deception; p 39 Early Conjuring Performances; p 41 The Doll; p 43 The Bullroarer; p 47 The Shaking Tent; p 53 The Rope; 57 Stories of the origins of magic; p 57 Stories of the Beginning; p 61 The Magic Behind the Magic; p 64 The Economic-political Theory; p 70 Shamanism and the Origin of Conjuring; p 76 Deception in the Animal World; p 80 Conclusion; p 82 Matinee magic; p 82 Matinee; p 86 Response to Matinee; p 88 Sawing a Woman in Two; p 89 The Horrible Sawing; p 93 The Humorous Sawing; p 95 The Holy Sawing; p 98 Matinee Magic; p 101 Tricksters and real jokers; p 101 Tricksters; p 104 Images of Trickster; p 106 Real Jokers; p 121 A potion or two; p 127 Are card tricks card magic? p 127 What is a “Good” Card Trick? p 128 The Awareness of "Moves" Murders Magic; p 129 Can a Spectator Restate the Effect? p 129 The Adventures of the Props; p 131 Card Tricks and Card Magic; p 133 Sole survivor p 137 Meaning in magic; p 137 Literal Demonstration; p 139 Problems with Literal Demonstration; p 140 Symbolic Demonstration; p 142 The Transformation of Magical Demonstration; p 145 Parable magic; p 146 Parables; p 146 Zen Tales; p 147 Sufi Tales; p 147 Modern Tales; p 149 Truth Beyond Comprehension; p 153 The Parables of Jesus; p 154 Parable Tricks; p 154 Parable of the Publican and the Tax Collector; p 157 Parables of the Lost Sheep and Lost Coin; p 158 Parable of the Great Feast; p 162 Conclusion; p 163 Triskaidekaphobia; p 168 Alternative Routine; p 168 More Facts and Their Sources; p 173 Many magics; p 175 Primary Magic; p 179 Secondary Magic; p 181 Reduced Magic; p 183 Restored Magic; p 187 Reflexive Magic; p 188 Conclusion & Performance of Close-Up Magic. A "series of evocative essays" that he hopes will, "challenge you, cause you to stop and reflect upon your own magic, inspire you to practice and rehearse, and, in the process, improve your own close-up magic performances." Contents: p 13 1. Groundwork: Burger talks about the purpose of the book; p 15 2 What is Close-Up Magic? Can a performance for a room full of people truly be said to be "close-up"? p 19 3 The Main Road: Don't you think that close-up magic has been sidetracked for many decades now? ; p 34 5 Hands Your hands are on display in close-up magic--shouldn't you give some thought to their appearance? 38 6 Using a Cigarette Pull. Can one be a non-smoker and still do cigarette magic? Burger explains some sleights and delves into the finer points of using a Pull; p 49 7. A Question of Character -- Who is performing the magic? Should you be yourself or a stage persona? P 51 8 Uncle Geek: Uncle Geek is the name I have given to the magical buff (buffoon?) who is constantly adding new tricks to his so-called repertoire, but who never learns to do any of them well; p 55 9. Three-Card Monte as a Magical Entertainment: Thee-card Monte routine (assumes reader is already familiar with the standard moves.); p 58 10. Magic Lectures: Should "magic lecture" = "explaining tricks"? p 65 12 Conversation at the Airport: An imaginary dialogue, in which Burger reveals some of his thoughts on the Art of magic. Conversation at the Airport; p 75 14 Performing for Magicians: Burger delves into the reasons behind the oft-heard comment, "I like to perform for laymen, not other magicians." p 80 15. Stealing: "Borrowing" routines and patter, not the sleight-of-hand variety. p 87 17 Books: Burger writes about the usefulness of magic books, and lists some of his favorites. p 100 19 Negative Thought: A brief digression on the power of positive thinking. p 124 22 Daydreaming and Imagination -- Burger writes about where he gets his ideas. p 126 23 An Imaginary Conversation with Eugene Burger: Another dialogue, in which the main points of the book are recapped. p 133 24 A Final Examination: Some soul-searching questions and a bit about the nature of change& Mastering the Art of Magic ©2000 Kaufman and Greenberg, 228 pages. The seven small booklets written by Eugene Burger and published in the early 1980's: Secrets and Mysteries, Audience Involvement, Secrets of Restaurant Magic, Eugene Burger on Matt Schulien's Fabulous Card Discoveries, Intimate Power, The Craft of Magic and Rediscoveries have long been out-of-print and commanding large sums of money second-hand. Newly organized together, you can collect these hard-to-find booklets in a completely re-typeset format with new essays by Eugene commenting on his past writings, his current thoughts on his tricks and routines, as well as updated tricks. & The Experience of Magic by Richard Kaufman.1989 Richard Kaufman and Alan Greenberg, 140 pages. Interesting essays including p 11 Question: What is the experience of magic?; p 15 Putting frames around magic effects; p 45 The Tyranny of the New. Advice on learning new magic; p 49 The Corner in the Glass (Again). Card trick with interesting revelation, and great thinking; p 56 The Way of the Cat. Essay. What can we learn from cats? p 81 The Two Magics. Essay with history, religion, and more; p 118 The Sense of Mystery in a Japanese Garden. Essay; p 130 Why I Write. Essay; p 135 Experiences of Magic. Essay. & Growing in the Art of Magic.1992, 45 pages. p 1. Growing: This section deals with how we can better grow in our magic. He stresses the importance of asking ourselves questions and listening to ourselves; p 2. The Way of the Magician: Here, Eugene talks about how there are no unimportant moments in a show and why we should pay attention to all the details; p 3. Managing People Close-Up: In this chapter, he deals with the problem of hecklers and how to deal with them; p 4. Before the Show (with Danny Orleans): Eugene talks with Danny Orleans about how he prepares for a show and what kind of preparation is necessary; p 5. After the Show (with Danny Orleans): Eugene and Danny continue their conversation to after the show. They talk about eating pizza and evaluating your show. Recording (both audio and video) as an aid in the evaluation process; p 6. The Origin and Symbolism of Magic (with Jack Gould): This section contains a discussion between Eugene and Jack Gould about the origins of magic in prehistoric times, how magic and religion are interlinked; p 7. The Future of Magic (with Jay Inglee): Eugene and Jay Inglee discuss where magic is heading. They talk about how a lot of magic nowadays is about 'The Adventures of the Props in the Performers Hands' and how to change it to something more meaningful; p 8. Seeking a Magical Vision: Here, Eugene deals with the question everyone should be asking themselves: 'How can I present my magic in my own, unique way? p 9. Imagination, Solitude, and Creativity: Eugene talks about how we can be more creative, and gives some tips on stimulating our imagination. & Intimate power: Psychological presentations for the close-up entertainer. & The Chicago Tapes and Booklet. The Chicago Tapes by Eugene Burger, is actually a set of 3 DVD's and one explanation booklet. Chicago Visions Booklet. This little booklet holds all the secrets behind the Chicago Tapes. Inside the booklet, Eugene is interviewed by some of todays best magicians about each one of the DVD's. Eugene shares everything from the conception of the routines, to the execution of the effects. This rare look into the mind of the magician is a useful companion to the DVD set. Eugene Goes Bizarre DVD is the less interesting of the three DVDs, but Gourmet Close-Up Magic DVD and Real Secrets of Close-Up Magic DVD are full of precious teachings. & Mystery School co-authored with Jeff McBride. An Adventure Into the Deeper Meaning of Magic First held in 1992, Eugene Burger and Jeff McBride's Mystery School promised to be a magic conference unlike any other: a group of magicians dedicated to seriously exploring the deeper sides of the art of magic. This event would not be held in a hotel or restaurant, but at a beautiful retreat center in nature where creativity and fellowship across differences could be inspired. Nine years later, after eleven incredibly successful sessions, Jeff and Eugene ended Mystery School at its peak. Now, in Eugene Burger and Jeff McBride’s first-ever collaborative work, the rest of us may at last peer into the shadowy conclave known as Mystery School. In this most unusual collection of essays, magic, ideas, and artwork the spirit of a very unique group of artists has been preserved, while still guarding the secrecy in which they met. Featuring Jeff McBride stage masterpieces revealed for the first time, new pieces by Burger, and essays by Mystery School faculty member Robert Neale, plus magic and writings by some of the world’s most magical thinkers, including: Bob Fitch, Dan Harlan, Paul Harris, Kevin James, Vito Lupo, Patrick Martin, Max Maven, Stephen Minch, Alain Nu and Peter Samelson.
Carey, Chris. Do the stuff that’s you. The book contains more advice than a simple choice of effects.
Carney, John: Carney on Ramsay. DVD. John’s take on cylinder and coins and on coins in the hat. A course in misdirection and a real showmanship improvement on the coin in the hat (the coins are not taken from under the hat).
Cellini, Jim. The Royal Touch – The art of street magic. This 188 page hardbound book covers the work of this famous street magician. His tips on Street Performing are priceless and the effects are the epitome of "pure magic." Contents include Where to Work the streets, Street Performer's Workshop and Tools (including the famous Cellini Topit), How to actually perform on the street, the Law of the Street.
Christian, Brad. Inside Magic DVD 2.
Christopher, Milbourne: Milbourne Christopher's Magic Book Tricks for the Living Room, Dinner Table, or Stage ©1977 Milbourne Christopher. Published by Signet, New American Library. Original Hardcover Thomas Y Crowell Co. and in Canada by Fitzhenry & Whiteside Limited, Toronto, 216 pages; p 1 Magic and Magicians: essay on patter, preparation, recovery from mistakes and surprises, difficult audiences, pre-show prepration, originality, and deception & illusion; p 28 Ch 1: Direction and Misdirection
Close, Michael: Closely Guarded Secret. CD ROM. innovative ebook disk, using a PDF format, which allows you to read this book on your computer screen or print it but with unique video clip feature. By clicking on links in the document, you are presented a short video of certain sleights in place of static illustrations.
Cohen, Steve: Win the Crowd. Publishers Weekly Steve Cohen's new book reveals the secrets of all great showmen - how to persuade, influence, and charm, and ultimately accomplish the things you've always wanted to do. Win the Crowd teaches how to take over a room, read people, and build anticipation to a feverish pitch so people are burning to hear what you have to say. You'll also learn Steve Cohen's Maxims of Magic, simple rules you can use to take charge of practically any situation, from on-the-job disagreements to dating to important cocktail parties. The Maxims of Magic will wash away insecurities and hesitations, and replace them with confidence, poise, and leadership
Conn, Doug. Conn-Juring Notes Prestidigitation, Legerdemain, & Other Unique Entertainments ©2004 Doug Conn. p 18 Plausible Presentations: Essay. Magic can have more impact if there is a plausible explanation. Explores some approaches & Connsolidated Connundrums ©2006 Doug Conn; p 28 Believe: work with your audience, not "for" them
Crone, Tom: Misdirection for Close-up Magicians. Minneapolis, Crone Communications, 1999.
Crum, Thomas F.: The Magic of Conflict. Book on Amazon
Curcillo III, Esq, Joseph A. Performance on Trial: the case for better performance Defense attorney and law professor, Joseph Curcillo is perhaps best known in the magic community for his performing persona, "Joey the See, Mentalist to the Mob." This limited edition printing (100 copies were printed for the 2008 TAOM) summarizes Curcillo's thoughts on performance, inspired by his experience as a trial lawyer as well as his study of Aristotle's Rhetoric and his own experience as a performer and speaker.
Daniels, Paul. Paul Daniels Masterclass 7 CD set. Recorded during the recent Masterclass tour of the USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand, Paul Daniels reveals the secrets of how to succeed and profit in the world of show-business. Each topic is fully explained, and Paul also allows ample time to answer questions. Paul Daniels has performed more magic on TV than anyone else in history, he is widely considered to be one of the foremost authorities on magic, and his Masterclass events have been attended by the biggest names in magic. This audio set is the perfect way to improve your magic (and business) knowledge whilst driving in the car! Subjects covered, include: * How to dramatically improve every trick you already own * How to develop your stage presence and persona * How to get on TV, radio, and in the news * How to double or triple your profits from every show you do * The real secrets of Publicity – how to promote your business for little cost * How to use business cards effectively * The importance of setting targets and goals * How to keep an audience attentive and win them back if you lose them * What to do when someone says, "I know how you do that" * Advice and practical guidance on putting an act together * How to get the best from agents * The differences between agents and managers * How to develop and promote yourself as a brand * Paul’s views on packet tricks * Paul’s favourite magic tricks and magic books * Paul’s favourite performers and why * The story of the Louis Theroux reality TV show * Tips on how to succeed in restaurant magic * What you can learn from Maurice Fogel and Al Koran * An explanation of the development of Paul’s chop cup routine * Advice on getting bookings for large stage shows * Working with animals * Using assistants * The story behind the famous chimpanzees’ routine on TV * The background to the Electric chairs routine. It may be the greatest sharing of a true professional's secrets of success, that any serious student or practitioner of the magical arts could ever hope to receive at any price. Solid gold all the way. Paul did not duck or dodge any question fired at him by some of the biggest names of magic in the Las Vegas scene.
Chowdhury, Deepak Roy. Magic and story. 28 pages
Cuthbertson, Rod. How to make a magician of yourself. This book marked the Australian Society of Magicians' 5th Anniversary and the ASM actually used it as a magic course for many years. The first part of the book covers the history of the ASM. Next, Rod Cuthbertson authored a treatise on the performing side of magic--presented fairly informally as a course in the art of performing magic. It covers in fair detail the theory of magic entertainment through building on personality, rules to observe, and being modern. Presentation is also explored in how to sell your personality and magic as to dress, appearance, props and using misdirection. Stagecraft is outlined, including rights and wrongs on stage and how to develop an act with appropriate speech and movement. Finally, there is a section on combining effects and building and improving an act. Part Two then details basic methods & moves and where to find out more, plus Allied Arts and other types of performing and a bibliography of the best material offered at the time
Daniels, Paul: Highlights of Paul Daniels' Masterclass 2003 DVD
2 packed hours of video instruction about the business of magic. Paul shares tips on how to make more money from your shows, how to be a better performer, how to handle hecklers, as well as many anecdotes and stories that each contain a powerful lesson. The Masterclass events held in Australia, UK, and USA were received with standing ovations everywhere and we have received numerous comments from magicians saying that attending and applying the techniques has turbo-charged their career! This DVD is the next best thing to being there.
Paul Daniels Masterclass 7 CD set
Recorded during the recent Masterclass tour of the USA, UK, Australia and New Zealand, Paul Daniels reveals the secrets of how to succeed and profit in the world of show-business. Each topic is fully explained, and Paul also allows ample time to answer questions. Paul Daniels has performed more magic on TV than anyone else in history, he is widely considered to be one of the foremost authorities on magic, and his Masterclass events have been attended by the biggest names in magic. This audio set is the perfect way to improve your magic (and business) knowledge whilst driving in the car! Subjects covered, include: * How to dramatically improve every trick you already own * How to develop your stage presence and persona * How to get on TV, radio, and in the news * How to double or triple your profits from every show you do * The real secrets of Publicity – how to promote your business for little cost * How to use business cards effectively * The importance of setting targets and goals * How to keep an audience attentive and win them back if you lose them * What to do when someone says, "I know how you do that" * Advice and practical guidance on putting an act together * How to get the best from agents * The differences between agents and managers * How to develop and promote yourself as a brand * Paul’s views on packet tricks * Paul’s favourite magic tricks and magic books * Paul’s favourite performers and why * The story of the Louis Theroux reality TV show * Tips on how to succeed in restaurant magic * What you can learn from Maurice Fogel and Al Koran * An explanation of the development of Paul’s chop cup routine * Advice on getting bookings for large stage shows * Working with animals * Using assistants * The story behind the famous chimpanzees’ routine on TV * The background to the Electric chairs routine * Comments about performing the national BBC TV shows every week “I had the privilege of attending Paul Daniel's Master Class in Las Vegas. In my opinion, it was the greatest sharing of a true professional's secrets of success, that any serious student or practitioner of the magical arts could ever hope to receive at any price. Solid gold all the way. All shared by one the most respected names and talents of the professional Theatre world. He did not duck or dodge any question fired at him by some of the biggest names of magic in the Las Vegas scene. All of this given at a tuition price which was considerably less than most of us have paid for a useless piece of junk that we have kept hidden in a cupboard somewhere gathering dust. Bravo.” - Peter Reveen, Manager of Lance Burton. 7 CD set in Quality Binder
Darwin, Gary: Reaction Ad-Libs (DVD Download) Penguin Magic; The ultimate Course in Situational One-Liners for Magicians includes outs when things go wrong.
Devant, David: Lessons in conjuring.
Derris, John: Come a little closer
Dexter, Will: Plotting Magic The Magic Wand Vol 43 # 241 Mch 1954 p 8. & Vol 43 # 242 June 1954 p 53
Durham, Geoffrey. Professional secrets: a life in magicIn between the explanations of the effects, Geoffrey gives us insight into the how and why of things. He tips the real work behind the tricks, not just the secret, but how he arrived at the routine he created. Something so important that many may miss out on the real golden nuggets hidden in this book if they are just looking for effects. Priceless information that many of us would pay a director 1000's of dollars to teach us. His streamlined methods and presentations are honed to perfection from thousands of live performances. Geoffrey shares his innermost thoughts on showmanship, patter, audience handling, rehearsal and much more, in a series of well written essays that aren't so much magical theory but true magical genius. Drawing from his vast experience as a performer in many venues, he helps us learn from his mistakes. He sets us on the road to REAL show-business success
Earle, Lee. The Gentle Art of Cold Reading.Book and Audio CD Cold reading is a combination of flim-flam, applied psychology, and glib entertainment, it persuades folks to believe that you know more about them than they ever thought possibleThe CD covers Lee Earle's original „Classic Reading“, which is a great introduction to character analysis and psychic reading and gives you a framework which you can develope and flesh out complete with additional lines. It is essentially a personality sketch which you can find on various internet resources, only Lee does the one thing to the classic Forer sketch that nobody ever thinks to do, and that is what makes it so good... The CD adds updates on working for skeptics and intuitive reading.
Edmundson, Gerald: The Ostrich Factor How to practice an effect, rehearsing sleights, attention control, misdirection, movements, and patter… and applying these concepts.
Elmsley, Alex. Collected Works by Stephen Minch 1991. Vol 1: a ground-breaking essay by Alex Elmsley on presentation, psychology and misdirection
Enters, Agner. On Mime. Middletown, Connecticut, Wesleyan – 1965. Interesting demonstration on the use of breath rhythm as misdirection.
Evans, Eric & Craver, Nowlin The Secret Art of Magic
Fitzkee, Dariel: Magic by misdirection & Showmanship for magicians.
Ganson, Lewis. The Art of Close Up Magic Volume 1. Illustrated by Dennis Patten, Hardcover, 401 pages. With a foreward by Fred Lowe. p 1 Chapter 1 - The Presentation of Close-Up Magic: essay on the presentation of magic; p 1 Introduction: presentation style varies depending on the size of the group; p 3 One Spectator; p 6 A Small Group; p 10 The Large Group; p 11 Containers: carrying and storing magic props; p 15 Working Surface: table surface, dice stacking; p 16 Music: Music, players, and a suggestion for a comedy bit; p 21 Close-Up Effects: choosing effects with a plot; p 22 Length of Performance: suggestions; p 24 Practice: suggestions; p 26 Economy of Movement: improving your performance; p 29 Borrowing: to borrow or not to borrow from the audience; also some suggestions on examination of objects; p 86 Chapter 4: It's a Gamble. Routines with a gambling theme. Advice to present as a lecture-demonstration to avoid offense;
Hustle, Danny. Art of Krowd Keeping. Hustle details the strategies and routines that Gazzo uses to keep the attention of a crowd, and to persuade them to part with their money. For the ones interested in what captivates an audience and keep them amazed.
Germay, Luke. Building Blocks. blending up-to-the-minute psychological techniques with some classic conjuring methodology
Goldman, Bill The little book of big secrets. This manuscript shows how to investigate how some Magician attained prominence and how you can follow their example to gain more success. Bill maintains that it is not the effects or the routines, but the way a performer affects the audience that makes a Lance Burton or a David Copperfield. In the book Bill strives to give practical, real world tips and techniques that will allow you to win the hearts, minds, and imaginations of paying crowds. Bill tells you in plain and simple terms how to become the great magician and performer you have always wanted to be & Confesssions of a corporate warrior. This DVD set is the most important reference for trade show magicians. What makes a Corporate Warrior? Over twenty years of performing thousands of shows for Fortune 500 companies! Bill Goldman has traveled the world performing at trade shows, hospitality suites, sales meetings and after dinner banquets! This special two DVD set documents an incredible Inner Circle trading session between Bill and four working professionals. Bill's conversations with Tim Noonan, Brian Irwin, Bram Charles, and Jason Bird tip it all. You'll learn the real work that only years on the road could teach you. The guys ask all of the right questions that extract every possible piece of information from the center of Bill's brain. It's the stuff nobody ever talks about! With a running time of 2 hours and 45 minutes, the two DVD set contains extremely valuable information on scripting, trade show pitches, premiums, length of performance, give-a-ways, stopping traffic, building crowds, marketing, promo videos, payment strategies, and so much more. The presentation is in a refreshing conversational style that is often as hilarious as it is educational and inspiring! Bonus Eight New Routines! A Ton Of Hilarious Goldman Stories
Goshman, Albert. Magic by Gosh, the times and life of Albert Goshman by Patrick Page
Green, Charles. Restaurant Magic. Audio CD. Strolling magic in restaurants is a great venue for close-up or stand-up magic. Here, Charles gives valuable advice on how to identify performing outlets, obtain bookings, and determine salary. He also includes insightful information on contracts, showcasing, opening night, relationship strategies, and self-promotion.
Hahne, Nelson. The Sphinx July 1929. XXVIII N° 5. Deceptive Psychology. An interesting work predating the discovery of modern psychology and really covering Magic. It covers various form of suggestion: suggestion through association, suggestion by repetition, suggestion through imitation, suggestion through obedience. His suggestion through association covers noise example could be the click pass with coins: the noise associates the moves with a transfer from one hand to the other. Feints are the most direct example of suggestion by repetition: do a genuine move for a purpose and then fake it when you repeat it. Suggestion through imitation: Nelson Hahne’s example is that if you want somebody to look at something (a coin in his example), look at it yourself (and follow its alleged journey with your eyes). Suggestion through obedience claims that people always act along the line of least resistance: avoid creating hostility and use assertive speech to more systematically obtain the desired response. More a series of recipes than a thorough approach to misdirection.
Hall, Trevor H.: The card magic of Edgar G. Brown. Book. In the second part the six lectures printed during the 40s on the magic for magicians and magic for lay-people.
Hass, Larry. Transformations: Creating Magic Out of Tricks. Being an excellent magician does not reside in knowing lots of “tricks,” but rather in the thoughtful application of psychological and theatrical principles that transform our best tricks into experiences of magic.
Hildebrandt, Dale: Hypnohole & Other Absurdities. Dale A Hildebrandt walks a different path from most magicians. His knowledge of Neurolinguistic programming (NLP), hypnosis, Wonder Words, and psychology is evident throughout the book.
Hoffmann, Professor [Angelo Lewis]. The Magician Annual 1910-1911 by Will Goldston p 12: The Magic of Suggestion. „…the secret of the magician lies in his power of misdirecting the attention of the spectator, and I had in fact intended Misdirection In Magic to bet the title of this article. But on thinking over the matter with the attention due to the proper preparation of a paper fort he ANNUAL, it appears to me that this theory takes a part fort he whole“
Hugard Jean & Braüe, Frederic: Expert Card Technique. Very good comments in the chapter 6 on misdirection and presentation at the end of the book.
Hull, Burling: Magical Showmanship and Stage Craft
Hunt, Douglas & Cary: Pantomine, The silent theater. Chapter on pantomime as used by magicians.
Jay, Joshua. Methods in Magic. (2008) 9 routines illustrating Joshua Jay’s suggestions to improve magic performances and in-depth interview with Joshua Jay, taking in advise on many aspects like practising etc.
Kaye, Marvin. The Complete Magician. p 23 Why do people like magic? P 55 What do you say and why do you say it? P 63 when do you move and why do you do it. P 134 Controlling The Audience’s attention. P 141 in search of personal style. P148 putting together an act. P 174 Preparing for the stage show. P 183 Assistants and volunteers p chapters on various audience types (children, difficult young adults, elderly, hospital shows. A superb book generally but unduly ignored.
Keable, Ian. Stand Up: A Professional Guide To Comedy Magic
Knepper, Kenton: Wonder Words 1 The Art of Linguistic Deception & Rants to Raven 1 & Rant 2 & Secrets of indirection: As important as "mis-direction", indirection is a subtle way to cause the audience to accept things as true without conscious criticism. This manuscript details new effects and techniques based upon this powerful principle. From making "standards" truly remarkable (such as the Linking Rings, Egg Bag and even the Lota Bowl) to new works such as Kenton's "Indirection Bowl" direct from the opening of his act... & Miracles of suggestion. & Q book. & Creating Material & Making Your Performances Memorable: This material was originally intended to act as lecture notes for workshops that Kenton and Allen were conducting. However, it quickly became apparent that it needed to be put in legitimate book form. Kenton and Allen state, "You are about to embark on a journey in which few magic or mental books have dared to travel-if any. Everything about this book is unique." Topics Covered Include: * The Authentic Self * Presentational Concept * Story Technique * Eyes As the Window * Instant Grace * A Question of Context * Physical Actions *…
Kurz, Garry: Leading with your head. Booklet.
Lamont, Peter & Wiseman, Richard. Magic in Theory. Experiencing magic is a mental process. The eyes can be deceived, but if the mind isn't fooled there is no magic. The methods for deceiving the mind are the greatest and most powerful secrets magicians possess. These methods apply, or should apply to every trick you do, and can cause the simplest effect to be perceived as a miracle, you can rest assured that these are secrets no masked or unmasked opportunist will expose on television. Yet ironically, these invaluable secrets of deception are among the most neglected tools in the average magician's bag of tricks. In their new book, Magic In Theory, Lamont and Wiseman lay out these secrets in a clear, through and straightforward fashion that allows you to learn and apply them to every trick you perform. Peter Lamont and Richard Wiseman are eminently qualified for the task. Both have been professional magicians and continue to be deeply involved in magic; and both hold doctorates in psychology. By wedding their long-standing, first-hand knowledge, with the most current scientific research into human psychology, Lamont and Wiseman have been able to analyze the psychological secrets of magic, it's misdirection and its presentation more completely then ever before possible. In addition, to expand their analysis of this crucial subject, they have interviewed six of magic's finest and most thoughtful performers... Lance Burton, Mac King, Max maven, Darwin Ortiz, Michael Webber, and Tommy Wonder. Magic in theory teaches the real secrets of magic, secrets all magicians, whether performing close-up or on stage, must have to make the magic happen in the minds of their audiences.
Lavand, René. Magic from the soul.
Leech, Al: Don’t look now, the smart slant of misdirection. Booklet.
Leirpool, Jarle: More pocket power. Book. Comparison between magic and martial arts: unfortunately this betrays the author’s need to challenge the spectator. Challenge kills magic because it kills the needed suspension of disbelief, a necessary step for any trick to become really magical. The conclusion and the underlying spirit may be wrong but some there are some very intelligent analytic points in this lecture.
Lenier, Jules: Theater Close-Up. Published in a magazine but I cannot recall which one (I think it’s Magick but?)
Lowe, Fred: Slow Magic
MacGregor, Jerry. Real World Magic. Don't just dream about performing in the real world, Turn your dreams into reality! Jerry MacGregor (co-author of the Restaurant Magician's Handbook) draws on a lifetime in the theatre to offer more than 300 pages packed with information to help you succeed! Including.... • Insights into staging and movement • Wisdom on using words effectively • Tips on selecting, rehearsing, and creating a routine • Entertaining a workable routines drawn from the working repertories of more than a dozen professional magicians. Whether you work close-up, stand-up, on the stage or on the streets, you'll discover the secrets of success on a book that's been described as invaluable for those longing to take a step up in their performance
Martinez, Daryl: Scratching the Surface” Lecture Notes to Convention session No.1 (1982)
Martyn, Topper. Topper's Mad, Mad, Magic by Gene Anderson. 1974 Magic, Inc, Chicago. 54 pages, comb binding. p 29 How to Make People Laugh...Without Really Trying: an essay on comedy; p 51 Bibliography: a listing of other books on comedy in magic
Maskelyne, John Nevil & Devant, David: Our Magic. Despite the authors’ ffame and Tommy Wonder’s endorsement this is not the best book on the subject.
Maurice, Edward: Showmanship and presentation. 1946 46 pages
Maven, Max: Verbal Control. A great little work on equivoque & Scripting Tricks Scripting Magic
McCabe, Pete. Scripting Magic. The Secret Art of Magic is comprised of two sections, essentially two books: Street Magic & The Art of War and The Secret Art of Dispersion. Separate, yet inextricably linked by the paradigm of ancient war strategy. Street Magic & The Art of War uses strategies from Sun Tzu's The Art of War to teach the intricacies of street magic—from trick selection, to the pitch, to stopping people, to handling hecklers, to building a crowd, to collecting the hat. Its most profound lessons, however, deal with controlling yourself and your audience—the most critical thing for all performers. Though Street Magic and The Art of War is already being called "THE textbook" for street magic, ultimately the most important—and largest at 170pp—section of the book is The Secret Art of Dispersion. It provides a framework to understand, assimilate, and implement deception as never before. Using an ancient Chinese manuscript of 36 strategies for deception in warfare, The Secret Art of Dispersion teaches a new and expanded approach to misdirection—dispersion. Based on the military concept of dispersing concentration, it not only encompasses the concept of directing/misdirecting attention, but unifies all the ways magicians control their audience's awareness—not just of what they see, but of what they think about (and conversely, and perhaps more importantly, what they don't think about). While misdirection is usually thought of as a tool just for sleight of hand or manipulation, The Secret Art of Dispersion uses a plethora of examples to show the applications of dispersion with apparatus, illusions, stand-up, doves, mentalism, and children's magic as well. What People Are Saying: "The Secret Art of Magic is a remarkable book.
MacGregor, Jerry: Real World Magic. p 7 What are we doing? Part One: Reasons 1. Stepping into the Real World - A Routine, Not Tricks - Establish a Character - Keep Your Magic Visual - Have a Direct Opener - Choose Winning Effects - Involve the Audience's Emotions - Keep it Simple - Build Toward a Climax - Have a Clear Ending - Help Them Like You; 2. Learning to Entertain - The Audience Must Like Me - I Always Use Ordinary Props - I Work Standing Up - I Have to Like It - I've Got to Fool Them Badly; 3. The Meaning of Your Magic - Have a Strategy - Establish Your Personality - Choose Your Words Carefully - Reveal Your Wonder - Practice Your Timing - Create Excitement - Demonstrate Relaxation - Practice Everything; 4. Magic Words - What Do I Say? - How Do I Say It? - How Can I Use Words Effectively? - Do I Have to Be Funny? - What Do I Not Say? 5. Hocus Pocus and Sim Sala Bim - The Introduction - The Conclusion - The Transition; 6. The Magician on Stage; 7. Selecting Tricks for the Real Worl - Read Widely - Make Sure It Grabs You - Choose Visual Effects - Prefer Direct Effects - Prefer Normal Props - Prefect Practical Applications - Use Audience Participation - Think "Simple" - Know Your Audience - Know Your Limits; 8. Preparation and Practice - Walk Through It - Envision It - Get Comfortable With It - Have Someone Evaluate It - Repeat It - Set the Timing - Look for Naturalness - Focus on Misdirection - Check Your Reaction - Study the Situation; 9. Routining Your Show - The Notion of the "Show" - The Beginning: Start Fast - The Middle: Use Variety - The End: A Slam-Bang Finish – Crescendos - The Themed Act - The Basic Five - Tricks as Tools - Varied Venues - What Do People Like? 10. The Biggest Secret in Magic - The Big Goal - The Little Goals - The Biggest Secret
Muerte, Manuel. Done by Misdrection. Manuel Muerte, FISM winner, Master of Misdirection and member of the Flicking Fingers Demonstrates his tried and tested tricks in front of a live audience. Clear and easy instructions allow insight not only into the methods, but also into the basic principles and philosophies. In over two hours of viewing time, we learn 21 original stage and close-up routines. We accompany Manuel Muerte for a day in Berlin, learning the fundamentals of misdirection. As a special bonus, Manuel Muerte performs his award-winning FISM number for the first time on DVD
Neale, Robert E. & Parr, David. Magic Mirror This book is Robert E. Neale's newest exploration into the innermost workings of performance magic, filtered through the professional sensibilities of co-author David Parr. Dr. Neale insightfully identifies the many kinds of magic, in theatrical, historical and social contexts. From this foundation, he creates a method for classifying magical effects by their psychological roots. Using this system the reader can readily determine the underlying emotional content of an effect and build a powerful presentation around it. The Magic Mirror shows how magic can be comic, serious, thrilling, playful, inspiring. Included is a selection of exceedingly clever effects with full presentations, to illustrate Dr. Neale's points. & Magic and Meaning with Eugene Burger.
Nelms, Henning: Magic and showmanship. Book
Ortiz, Darwin: Strong magic. Creative Showmanship For The Close-Up Magician Why is it that some magicians get great audience reaction while others who are just as skillful leave audiences cold? The answers are in Strong Magic, the first-ever book on showmanship specifically for the close-up magician. As a successful professional magician for almost twenty years, Darwin Ortiz has appeared before thousands of audiences of all kinds. During that time he has studied what it takes to really move an audience. In Strong Magic he presents the results of those years of study and experience in a way that every magician can benefit from. Do you want applause, gasps, and praise? Do you want to be talked about and remembered? Strong Magic tells you how. & Designing Miracles ; creating the illusion of impossibility explores how lay people think and what it takes to amaze them. It supplies a new set of tools for understanding how magic works, why it sometimes doesn't, and how to make it work better.
Osterlind, Richard. Principles of Magic. Why can two performers do the same piece of material yet one consistently gets much more enthusiastic audience responses? Is it possible that some of magic's most sacred axioms such as "never repeat a trick" and "never tell an audience what you're going to do" may ultimately be responsible for the huge amount of mediocre magic that abounds? What is magic's biggest lie? These are just a few of the topics that Richard Osterlind tackles in what may be his most passionate argument yet for a return to the fundamental principles that once made conjuring one of the most respected of the performing arts. Over the years, these principles have, according to Richard, become misinterpreted, misunderstood or largely ignored, resulting in magic's unfortunate and undeserving loss of its rightful place in the public's estimation. The Principles of Magic is Richard Osterlind's warning flag that, as performers, we have to change many of our approaches and attitudes before it's too late and magic vanishes forever. A concern already expressed by Orson Welles almost hundred years ago and magic has never been as strong. Richard however is doing more than just a reasoned appeal to mystery performers everywhere to once again lift magic to its highest artistic potential, The Principles of Magic is about rediscovering what it was about magic that you first loved...and perhaps relearning how to share its original wonder with others.
Ouellet, Gary. Magic on TV - Performance Secrets. Camirand.
Pallme, Hermann: Entertaining by magic. 68 pages book,1906. History Of Magic; Educational Value In Magic; Magic As A Profession; The Study And Practice Of Magic; Concerning Deportment; The Dramatic Element; The Monolog; Music; Costume And Character; As A Social Advantage; Magic For Profit.
Parrish, Robert: The Magician's Handbook. A.S. Barnes and Company, Inc., New York, A Perpetua Book; Copyright 1944 by Robert Parrish, Copyright 1945 by Bernard Ackerman, Inc. New Edition 1958, Perpetua Edition 1960, Library of Congress Number 58-14113.
P 1. Warning: The Fun of Magic: An introduction to performing; p 2. The Way It Looks and the Way It Is: An essay on the appearance of things; p 3. The Old Ways and the New: A short essay on how magic has changed; p 4. The First Trick: The importance of learning it well, A matchstick trick presented; p 5. After Dinner Magic: Knife paddle, variation of glass through table, walnut and kumquat exchange; p 6. Card Magic with the Greatest of Ease: Controlling Cards and some tricks; p 7. How to be a Psychic: Five mental effects; p 8. Manipulating Many Things; p 9. Larger Tricks; p 10. A Magic Show; p 11. And the Pursuit of Magic...; p 12. How to be Deceptive; p 13. The Magic Counterpane; p 14. The Magic Tea Table; p 15. Needlework Magic; p 16. Take a Little Magic After Dinner; p 17. Magic for a Night Out; p 18. Bring Magic to Your Week Ends; p 19. The Magician on the Brass Rail Road; p 20. The Show
Pinard, Andrew J: Serious Bizness. Incorporating Humor into your Performance
©1996, 2000 Andrew J. Pinard; Absolutely Magic; P.O. Box 535; Bradford, NH 03221; absomagic.com. Analysis of the types of comedy and how they can be applied to our performance through visual humor. P 7 Visual Comedy; p 7 Character; p 8 Body Type; p 9 Costume; p 9 Attitude; p 10 The Common Link; p 11 Forms Of Visual Comedy; p 11 Slapstick And Violence; p 12 Maximizing The Impact Of Slapstick And Violence; p 13 Magic And Surrealism; p 13 Sudden Appearances/Disappearances; p 13 Transformation; p 14 Objects Coming To Life; p 15 Acceleration/Deceleration; p 15 Imitation, Parody, And Satire; p 17 Mime And Body Language; p 17 Form And Plot; p 18 The Anatomy Of Humor; p 19 Last-Minute "Quickies"; p 19 Conclusion; 21 Recommended Bibliography & Filmography
Pittman, Woody. The Big Picture : Character development for magicians. (published by te Author in 1998). This 38-page booklet helps us answering the question, "Who am I when I’m performing performing?" Great for anyone, from first steps in magic who might be imitating another magician, or more experienced performers looking for a change. This booklet will help you learn how to discover your own unique performing "character" and perform at your best.
Pyka, John. Theatrical Magic. A Magician is an actor playing the part of a magician…. Famous words, a famous quote. Too seldom do performers understand and use this philosophy. In his book, John uses his character Big Daddy Cool, and other original magical routines to teach the premise and process of taking our magic from the realm of a puzzle, and making it in to THEATER! Now, many of you will object that " magic isn't theater," or "magic is entertainment in and of itself," or "the amazement is the meaning." Magic can (and should) be amazing, but it can also be so much more. A magic show doesn't have to be a string of special effects and nothing more. It can tell a story, make a statement, or even instruct or educate. Unfortunately too many performers have created shows that are nothing but a string of special effects, that has no meaning or relevance. This is one of the reasons that many people regard magic as meaningless diversion (usually for children). It is because so many magicians have made it so. We have removed meaning and relevance from our magic. How sad. So, how do we fix this? Our hope is that this book will help make a difference. And you, by reading it may well be a part of the change. Theatrical Magic, in the simplest terms, is magic that is character and story driven. Whether it is known as Story Telling Magic, Bizarre Magic, Gospel Magic, or some other title, it is magic is that is used by the performer to accomplish several goals. 1) To tell a story, 2) to establish or showcase their character, 3) to solve a problem, 4) to make a statement, or 5) to instruct/educate. Often, magic accomplishes several of these goals at once. Of course it should go without saying that a fundamental purpose of theatrical magic is to entertain, amaze, and create wonder within the story. Sections Include: What is Theatrical Magic? The Story Behind the Stories: Swingin’ At The Roxy Mambo Scarves - Tahloola's Demise -Titanic Thompson Sidewalk Shuffle - Making Magic Your Own Jiggernaut - Character Development 101 Character Study/Bio Close-Up Stage: - Wonder Pen-atration - Scotch & Soda - Houdini's Metamorphosis - Everything's Rosy - The Legend of Billy The Kid - What’s My Motivation? Analyzing The Christ/Anneman Alignment Move - The Grand Stage: The Vizier's Love - J Johnny's Angels - Snowstorm in Armenia - Adventures of the Blue Phantom - The Vampire - Exercise In The Absurd: AKA The Pirate Act - Food For Thought Other Voices: - The Key to Room 158 - Nelson Griswold w/ Eugene Poinc - Broom Suspension by Bill Palmer- The Shaman by Jason Michaels BONUS: Tricks for Monkeys - Ruthless Ambition
Ramsay John: a lesson in misdirection. The Gen Vol 13 Number 7 November 1957 p 199.
Reneaux, James. Professional Technique for Magicians. Routining; Stage Waits; Staging; Getting On and Off (Entrances and Exits); Confidence; Make-up; Dress; Ethics; Tempo; Pacing; Timing; Rehearsing; Music; Lighting, etc. It is the “real meat” of showmanship and professional know-how. After reading it you can read it again and realize you missed a lot the first time.
Reynolds, Quentin. Perform like a pro DVD. Have you ever wondered why one magician with skill, talent, and a pleasant personality gets minimal reaction from his audience while another with equal or less talent can bring the house down. Most magicians think it is about the tricks, whereas it is actually about the experience you create for your audience. The tricks are only the tools to help you create this experience. On this DVD, taped live at The World Magic Seminar in Las Vegas, Quentin Reynolds shows you how to double the reaction to your current repertoire without changing any effect. While speaking from his experience as a children's entertainer, the principles shared here apply to any magical performance from-close-up to stage. You will discover: The simple formula on how to create a world class act, how to develop your most Suitable performing style, the single most common mistake made by stage magicians, the correct use of silence in your show, how to elicit gasps, how to build the magical moment, and how to build a balanced show so everything flows easily, Quentin uses examples from his own repertoire to illustrate the points he makes. With 30 years experience as a professional magician and over 10,000 children's shows in every conceivable performing condition, Quentin explains simply and clearly how you can perform like a pro and dramatically improve the audience reaction at every show you do.
Riese, Eberhard. Foundations, the Art of Staging Magic. 176 pages. This very well made book discusses techniques for developing great and creative magic acts. It is most of all addressed to magicians who have already gained some practical experience as illusionists and wish to tackle a new act. It is intended to show them a possible route to an original, unusual magic routine.
Rowland, Ian. Full Facts Book Of Cold Reading (4th edition). Cold Reading is the most powerful inter-active psychological technique in the world. It is useful in selling, business negotiations, interviews, presentations and even romance! If you want to influence what another person thinks and feels about you, cold reading is the most effective technique in the world. This is the definitive book on cold reading. It explains everything there is to know about this limitless technique! How can you apparently tell complete strangers about names, dates and events that mean something to them? In business, how can you seemingly get inside the mind of every lead, customer, client, colleague and rival? This book explains all, and is the most authoritative ever written on the subject.
Sankey, Jay. Beyond Secrets. 182 pages. Practice more effectively, Connect with your audience, Invite wonder, Nurture your creativity, Add humor to your magic, Market your unique talents, Write powerful scripts, Transition between effects, Choose spectators, Orchestrate your magic, Simplify your magic
Schneider, Albert: Description of The Theory and Practice of Magic Deception. Book in preparation http://www.worldmagiccenter.com/sales/descthry.htm & The Al Schneider Technique DVD 1 on the five steps of deception which is an illustrated theory of the same points. The analysis of the rewinding process by the spectators (steps 4 and 5) is a breakthrough in magical analysis.
Sharpe, Samuel H.: Great Magic & Neomagic. Booklets. Art and Magic, 2003. Art and Magic combines three profound works by S. H. Sharpe - author of Neo-Magic Artistry and other classics: the much-anticipated 1000 Thoughts on Art and Magic, Sharpe's revised text of the scarce Words on Wonder, and his serialized "Through Magic-Coloured Spectacles: A Sequel to Neo-Magic." Sharpe will blow your mind with his insights. Art and Magic is a great book for all magicians - any page, any time. It's a book of knowledge, a book of secrets, a book of magic for a new generation. & Conjuror's Psychological Secrets This book presents the classifications, principles and examples of important psychological techniques every magician should know about. The author has identified four fundamental Principals (Objective Illusions, Subjective Illusions, Influence by Suggestion, and Intellectual), with fifteen Specific Principles as sub topics within the major classes.
Simon, Bill: Effective card magic.
Spina, Joanie. Get Your Act Together! The "Real" Secrets of Magic from Joanie Spina DVD
Stanislavski, Constantin. An Actor Prepares. Theatre Arts Books – 1970. The book deals with the inner process/preparation an actor must explore in order to prepare for a role, how to control and stimulate his mind in order to convey the truth of his character. Stanislavski himself says, "My system is for those who have a creative nature. It's for the talented". On stage or on a movie set or in a magic close up situation performers have to be believable. If we feel there is something lacking in our acting but could never quite figure out what, chances are that we will discover it by studying Stanislavski
Stockman, Avo. Poetry reading. Magic is an art form centered around amazement, emotion, desire and in rare cases, beauty. It is not, however a strictly defined set of tools or props. Instead, it is an experience. Magic lives in the mind, not in the physical world. It is therefore necessary to weave magic into our lives it is to be fully appreciated. Magic in the form of a “show" is an extremely limited opportunity. Even for magicians who perform regularly, the amount of time one is “on" is limited to the small fraction of a day. To live as a magician is to share this beauty of wonder wherever and whenever the opportunity arises. It is therefore important to be ready to introduce magic into the fabric of your life. To propogate a myth, a legend around being someone with special powers requires more than a stage persona. Being true and being yourself on and off stage is the only way to catch those precious opportunities. Underneath the super power abilities, the real “magic" is sharing a piece of beauty with your audience. WIth that perspective, the world becomes your “stage", and every minute of every day your “showtime."
Stone, David. Secrets of table hopping. Lecture Notes on Professional Restaurant Magic In these 32 page notes for the professional magician, David Stone covers: The First Contact - How to make a good first impression with staff and guests. When To Perform - The right time to approach a table depending on the environment. Vertical Magic - David reviews his requirments for choosing material & Close Up. Book. This work is actually a book on how to make close up magic entertaining.
Sully, James. Illusions, a psychological study. 1889. Intelligent but too analytical for being of real practical value.
Swiss, Jamy Ian: Jamy Ian Swiss Lecture Video. In this lecture video, Jamy Ian Swiss gives an insight into the 'world of professional close up magic'. He covers such a wide spectrum, that this is more than just a guide to modern close up Magic. There's in depth information about routines and tricks in terms of 'openers', 'middles' and 'closers', with a strong emphasis on the psychological construction of Magic. Touching on the 'too perfect theory', Jamy shows the correct way to structure an effect in order to obtain the maximum level of mystery, from even the simplest of routines. With methods to get you several steps ahead of the audience, he offers sound advice on choosing the appropriate move for specific tricks and situations. Add to this, clear explanations of his routines and moves such as: 'Wish Fulfilment'; 'The Kiss of The Big Apple'; ‘Card Folds (including a new 'cull fold'); 'The Animated Finger Ring' Plus valuable tutorial on the use of invisible thread. This video contains a wealth of information and advice, delivered in an entertaining style, that will have you glued to your TV set for the full 80 minutes. A great video from one of Magic's top professional. Duration approximately 80 minutes) Skill level:- Some previous knowledge is assumed, some practice will be required
Tamariz, Juan. The Magic Way & Five Magical Points. The “criss crossing the gaze” in 5 magical points is not only a discovery, it is also a very proper evidence to John Ramsay’s theory of misdirection. The second lecture International Magic ‘Follow The Leader’ & ‘Same Trick Twice’ are both fully explained. But, this is much more than just a performance and explanation of magic, there’s an in-depth teaching on Comedy in Magic. Here Tamariz delves into how to make Comedy, various levels of it and more importantly, when to use it! All this plus details on Theory & Misdirection in Magic.
Teale, Oscar S. Higher Magic, Magic for the artist. Adams Press 1920. Interesting analysis by a former S.A.M. President and Secretary. Some forgotten gems in an ocean of generalities. & The Sphinx XXVII N° 6 August 1928 p 258-261. Prestidigitatorial Psychology continued with The Sphinx XXVII N° 7 September 1928 p 307-310. Prestidigitatorial Psychology. This series of two articles is an opinion confrontation between Oscar Teale, former President of the SAM, of an article by Alfred Binet (a father of psychology who interwied famous magicians of his time to write his work) in the Revue des Deux Mondes in October 1894. Alfred Binet’s translated in English is incorporated in the Smithonian Institute Report for 1894 page 555-571. As far as modern performers are concerned, Teale’s refutation is even more rhetorical than Alfred Binet’s theory: both are analytical confronting two cultures with no practical value. Teale is also making “definitive” statements which are totally in contradiction with Tamariz’s “Magic Way” as supported by modern magicians like Michael Ammar, David Williamson etc. Not worth entering the controversy.
Tennace, Richard. Acting for magicians. One of the main reasons magicians neglect the "acting" part of magic is because magic is such a demanding discipline to learn. A performing magician wears many hats. The magician has to learn sleights, misdirection and technical prowess of the hands. The magician is the choreographer, writer, sound person, booker and promoter of his show. Learning how to develop a character often takes a back seat because "there's no time to do everything!" But taking the time to learn how to develop a real character, or stage persona, is the most important thing you can do! It is the thing people remember. Cover's Such Topic's As: Playing The Part; Thinking Like Your Character; Dress And Look Like Your Character; The Base Character; Talking Like Your Character; The Theatrical Purpose.
Triplett, Norman. American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 11, No. 4 (Jul., 1900), pp. 439-510 doi:10.2307/1412365: The Psychology of Conjuring Deceptions
Vacara, Carlos essai sur le rythme de trois
Waldman, Carl and Joe Layden with Jamy Ian Swiss. The Art Of Magic (The Companion to the PBS Special). Los Angeles, General Publishing Group, 1997. 256pp., illus., gloss., bibliog., index, 4to. Boards in dj
Wardell, Peter Crowdpuller DVD. Peter Wardell who has spent more than 15 years performing on the streets in London teaches what he learned about getting and keeping crowds, pre-show preparation, and much more and as a bonus learn how to apply all these skills to tradeshow work. Routines explained include coins thru the table.
Weber, Ken: Maximum Entertainment. A fine new how-to book on performing. There are no tricks in this book, but it’s packed with secrets. The most important secrets-techniques for mastering an audience.
Product Details: * How to Be Your Own Director! * How to climb the Hierarchy of Mystery Entertainment! * How to target the "Big Three" Reactions! * Discover the Six Pillars of Entertainment Success! * Learn powerful tips for Scripting and Rehearsing, and Choosing the Most Powerful Material! * Discover invaluable Voice tricks and Language Skills! * Do you know the best way for magicians to be Funny? This book will show you! * Immensely practical tips on Sound and Lighting! * Find out what the most successful performers do Before, During, and even After every show! * Plus bonus chapters zeroing in on the special problems faced by Close-up magicians and Mentalists! "Insightful and inspiring...fun to read...destined to be a classic. I can think of only a few performers a very few who do not NEED this book! It’s packed with more nitty-gritty, real-world advice than a whole shelf of magic books." - Charles Reynolds Award-Winning Magic Consultant/Producer “Finally! A well-written book by someone who has been there and knows what he's talking about. If you are seriously interested in making an impact with mystery entertainment, your money would be so much better spent here than on the latest trick or video. Read it, digest it…let the material inspire you, provoke you and ultimately make you a better performer." -Craig Karges Six-Time "Entertainer of the Year" National Association of Campus Activities "The ultimate guide for the entertainer of the 21st century"deceptively simple, practical, and fun" highly constructive advice for any performer. With deep insight and gentle guidance, Ken Weber breaks a critical silence about the flaws within our art form. A stroke of genius in concept, and a joy to read!" -Marc Salem Star of the international smash hit, "Marc Salem’s Mind Games" Ken Weber: While still a teenager, Ken Weber was the "Official Magician" at the RCA pavilion at the New York World’s Fair. After receiving two university degrees in theater, he went on to a successful career as a full-time entertainer. Ken has appeared at over 500 colleges and universities, and for hundreds of corporations, associations, and resorts. Newsweek magazine named him "one of the most frequently requested" performers on the college circuit. In 1993, the internationally respected Psychic Entertainers Association awarded him their most prestigious honor, the Dunninger Award for Excellence in the Performance of Mentalism. This Book is a must for every magician / mentalist / entertainer.
Magic is the art of proving impossible things in parallel dimensions that can't be reached
tommy
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I keep them in my other book case. Smile
If there is a single truth about Magic, it is that nothing on earth so efficiently evades it.

Tommy
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Lawrence O writes:

Quote:
So my question would be (if I may ask): what are you after?
If the reply is magic, then don't go after rare books.
If the reply is rare books, you're in for some disappointment for the pleasure is in the search and once you have these books and you know their content, a large part of their interest fades away (at least it did for me).

-First of all, before I continue any longer, I must extend an immediate thank you/ merci to both Bill Hallahan and Lawrence O for their responses. They are simply the best!

My response to Lawrence’s query above is two-fold. First, of all, I was only after a simple listing of what those here thought to be the most important texts from 1584-1938; and I had anticipated some likely answers- as well as some fun that might come from the debate over them. Little did I know that I would be faced with the embarrassment of riches which you two have collectively bestowed upon us! Nor did I anticipate that the “landslide” of information would wipe out the possibility of any real debate over the subject.

Secondly, I take into account Lawrence’s caveat regarding the pitfalls of collecting. I am reminded of my years as an obsessed comic book collector turned dealer, in search of every possible comic book I could find to feed my insatiable appetite for accumulating a great collection of Golden and Silver Age comics. I can do no better than to refer interested parties to an essay written by Harlan Ellison on collecting (if I could find it amongst all my crap! --Damn it‘s good!) OR to the little story told in Terry Zwigoff’s “Crumb” about one man’s obsessions with collecting rare blues records to the point of stealing them and putting his job in Jeopardy. Yet, all said and done I am almost embarrassed at the proletariat aims of my former hobby in contrast to the great collection that Lawrence has amassed . But yes, one of my favorite heavy metal bands put it this way in a song “You know the chase is better than the catch” - Motorhead


Lawrence also writes:
Quote:
Naturally, each of us is entitled to pursue his dreams and I'd love to understand yours in more details. I keep a database covering works (with their © date, authors, illustrators, editors) effects, props, sleights and just keeping it up to date is a real work.

-Lawerence, Although I have not been able to read through your offerings with a fine toothed comb, I will assume that for the purpose of conserving time, (you say)--- “keeping it up to date is a real work” -that some of the descriptions listed above were lifted from other sources.

In terms of my “dreams” (as concern magic) it is my intent to not only be the magician that performs tricks and illusions but to be a “legitimate magician” with a good insight into the roots of magic’s history.

It is people like Bill Hallahan and Lawrence O who make what other’s in other places online have called the “green monster” or the “green wall of slime” a place of esteem and prestige. Especially in this little nook, our forum called “Food for thought”

Thanks-

Mark M Walsh
...The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity...

William Butler Yeats
Lawrence O
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Yes Mark: some of the descriptions listed above are chosen from various sources. I often like to take the marketing comments (when they are well done and honest enough) or the valid comments that are made by others. The point here is for me to have comments on works keeping some enthusiasm to avoid my own comments to become over the time too dry or blasé. I hope that this is not ethically reprehensible: it just aims at keeping passion in somewhat scholar references.
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I would like to thank Lawrence O for his extensive annotated list of seminal texts of magic, and especially for his inclusion of several excellent essays by Jim Buffaloe from his book Buffaloed - the Magic of Jim Buffaloe. As publisher (editor, typesetter, designer, etc.) of the book, I can say that it was quite a labor of love, but with satisfying results. There is so much good magic in the book that often the essays are ignored. But I think they are some of the finest in print, and on aspects of magic that are not commonly covered. Thank you Lawrence, for helping to bring more recognition to this work, which I feel it deserves.
Dan Garrett
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SAM National President 1994-1995
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Well Jim is probably more the person we should all show gratitude to.
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I am awestruck by the responses of both Bill and Lawrence above! Did you gentlemen actually type all of that information out or did you somehow transfer book lists from your computer files?

However you did it my hat is off to both of you. Amazing responses!

I never cease to be amazed at the wealth of knowledge and help available on this site.
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Lawrence has stated above that he accessed most of the information from an already existing database that he keeps for himself (made up mostly of dealer reviews).

Although Lawrence did not stay between the arbitrary dates I proposed, I think it is interesting to note that as far as he is concerned--- the most important magic books are books on theory, psychology and presentation. I tend to agree and when I began re-building my library I sought out these kinds of books first (although I have not acquired and read all on Lawrence's list I do have a good chunk of them).

Your right both lists are impressive you've saved us a lot of research!

Thanks!


Quote:
On 2009-01-18 13:59, cinemagician wrote:
Lawrence has stated above that he accessed most of the information from an already existing database that he keeps for himself (made up mostly of dealer reviews).

Just a clarification- my statement above might lead some to think that Lawrence "just copies down" what is written about these books. I know that is not the case as evidenced in many of his contributions here.

Lawrence's posts are among some of my favorites on the entire Café- each is a wealth of insight and information-

Mark
...The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity...

William Butler Yeats
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Lessons in Conjuring by David Devant is on Lawrence O's list. It was published in 1922, and should be on my list, as it's an important book before 1938. I know it's a good book even though I don't have it now, because David Devant wrote it, and because Steven Youell, and Lawrence O recommended it.

I recently found a first edition, and it wasn't expensive! It should arrive in another week, or so.
Humans make life so interesting. Do you know that in a universe so full of wonders, they have managed to create boredom. Quite astonishing.
- The character of ‘Death’ in the movie "Hogswatch"
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Mark

Thank you for the tactful and generous comment.
Magic is the art of proving impossible things in parallel dimensions that can't be reached
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