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B Hackler
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I am thinking about purchasing a set of two photography flood lights that are 500 watts a piece to light up a stage when the light is dim. I plan on setting them near the edges of my backdrop and pointing them toward the middle of the stage is this a good solution? any advice would be great.
B Hackler
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Anyone?
Kent Wong
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Wouldn't those lights be a little harsh to look at if you're sitting in the audience? Why not simply use one or two followspots facing towards the stage? Or use LED washes mounted on T-stands on either side of the stage.

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B Hackler
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I thought of the flood lights as a option to light up the stage when the light was dim. where could I get the led washes mountd on t stands at? thanks
Kent Wong
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Michael Messing
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I use this quartz video lighting set:
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/15......ing.html

While Kent is correct that video lighting is pure white light and somewhat harsh, they have some great advantages. One, they pack a lot of light in a small package. This is 1,200 watts of light in a toolbox (including the light stands!)

Two, they are very convenient to set up. Three, they are reasonably inexpensive.

Yes, theatrical lighting is better but it is usually more expensive (especially is you're buying follow spots) and much more complicated to set up.

I use this light kit for one purpose only and that is to add a good amount of light when the stage area is dim. Since the kit comes in a toolbox, it's not a big deal to transport them. I can put them in my van and take them just in case I need them.

The only concern about these lights is the heat they put out. They get very hot and you really want to make sure the light stands are where no one can easily knock them over.

Michael
B Hackler
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Thanks for the help
David Bilan
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Michael's lights are a good selection.

I second his comments about safety. If you are on a stage, you are reasonably safe. Having these lights at floor level with 8-year olds is asking for disaster. A 500 watt light is not only hot, it is top-heavy on a stand (weighing the base of the stand down with sandbags helps stabilize the unit.

Other issues: 1000 watts of lighting pulls 8 amps. Electrical load should be limited to 80% of the circuit capacity (20 amp breaker should not exceed 16 amp load). If your circuit is powering a coffee pot, both lights and a microwave, you could be in trouble. remember, one circuit may cover several outlets.

It is also possible to put diffusion in from of the light to soften it. This cuts the amount of light considerably, but difussion is reasonably cheap and takes up no space in a light kit.

Dave
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jlevey
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All good points Dave, Michael and Kent. Thanks. I have been using a 500 watt quartz unit on each side (45 degree to the stage, but have found them bright for my own eyes to look into. I have switched to 300 watt (quartz) in each unit and this is better --still lights the stage nicely in a church basement or small gym. I put a pink gel in front of each light (over the protective glass to cut the glare and make the stage (and me the performer) look a little bit warmer. It has worked well for the last few years, but the flood lights I use (home depot workshop type) are not well made and the circuitry in one unit has gone bad. Time to replace with a new unit. I have my lights mounted on lightweight Manfrotto stands and weigh down each stand's base with heavy sand bags, to prevent people knocking them over, etc.

Still not certain which way I will go... I might just go the most economical route at this time and replace the one flood light with a Home Depot replica. Or, simple photo flood lights that should be better made and more dependable. I'm also considering Michael M's suggestion (in another thread) of purchasing the more expensive Hedler lights with the self-cooling fans.

Jonathan

For further discussion on Portable/spot-lighting see:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......forum=11
Jonathan
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jlevey
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Michael, when I clicked on the link you provided above to view the tool kit/portable lights that you currently use (Smith-Victor K40A Toolbox Quartz Lighting Kit, consisting of Two SG700 Flood Lights, 1200 watts total), the company's ad says that this particular kit has been discontinued.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/15......ing.html

Since I already have my nice Manfrotto stands, do you happen know where I might purchase a similar set of lights as the ones you own? Perhaps at our local (Montreal) photography store. Can gels be put in front of the light's lens that you own, to cut down on the glare?

Also, doesn't 600 watts of light shining at you directly while yo perform on stage hurt your eyes --perhaps it might even damage the performer's vision?

I'm a bit concerned about this as I only have one set of eyes and cannot seem to find a good quality back-up set of eyes online these days Smile

Please advise.

Jonathan
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jlevey
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I believe I may have found your lights sold on the same site that you sent us to, Michael.

Please confirm.

However, I don't need the stands and not sure I need (or want) the barn doors that come with it.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/48......ten.html

Actually, in my Home Depot flood lights, I have always used quartz halogen type. Can someone please tell me the difference between quarts halogen and quartz tungsten?

Many thanks.

Jonathan
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jlevey
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Actually, to cut set-up and strike down time in half,and reduce the weight of transporting heavy equipment (those sand bags are heavy enough!!!), would using one spot-light (ie.Chavuet 400), as I've seen suggested on other Café threads, actually light the stage in a church basement or gym sufficiently? I was always under the impression that two lights were an absolute requirement, in order to light the stage without harsh shadows (Each light set at 45 degree angle to the stage serves to "cancel" shadows out.

Please advise on all of the above.

Jonathan
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Michael Messing
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Spotlights are great but you usually want someone to be able to man the light so they can follow you. A spotlight is intended to focus light in a small area and not give a general "wash" of light. That's where two lights come in handy.

As far as I know, quartz halogen and quartz tungsten are the same type of lights.

Here is the updated link for Hedler lights:
http://www.hedlerusa.com/C%20Series.htm

As for lights causing problems with your eyes, you want the lights high enough that they are not directly in your eyes. I use 14 foot light stands to get my lights up high enough that, even with me on a 3 foot tall portable stage/riser, the light are still above me when the stands are still on the floor.

Lights coming from above is pretty standard theatrical lighting.

Hopefully, this helps some.

Michael
jlevey
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It does help, Michael. Thanks.
Jonathan
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Alan Munro
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I bought a couple of 300w incandescent flood bulbs for my fixtures. They don't blind the audience volunteers and work quite well as supplemental lighting. I bought the bulbs from a local company that sells stage gear.

I used to use quartz halogen lighting, but read of too many horror stories of bulbs exploding all over people. I couldn't use the barn doors with those fixtures because the heat caused a sound that sounded like gunshot, as the metal expanded - not cool at a banquet.
jlevey
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What tiype of fixtures did you use with the bulbs Alan. In any case, thanks for your input.

Jonathan
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Alan Munro
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Quote:
On 2009-12-17 18:14, jlevey wrote:
What tiype of fixtures did you use with the bulbs Alan. In any case, thanks for your input.

Jonathan

I currently use Smith-Victor 90UL fixtures: http://www.smithvictor.com/products/deta......&nm=90UL

I could do without the reflector, considering the Phillips 300W Reflector Floods that I use. It's just that the mount attaches to the reflector so much easier. I suppose I could use the 100UL - it would save on space. I have the fixtures mounted on high tripods - the clamps detach to allow for this.
Michael Messing
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Alan, I know it's possible for halogens to explode but that's usually because they've been handled. The oils from a person's fingers get on the envelope (glass) of the bulb and that's what causes the bulb to blow when it gets hot. I've been using quartz video lights off and on for about 30 years and I've never had a bulb blow. I wear gloves or use a cloth to handle the bulbs when replacing them.

In addition, many quartz lights come with a safety glass on the front to provide extra protection. (The Hedler lights have safety glass in them.)

Michael
Alan Munro
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One reason that I stopped using the halogen lights is because the audience volunteers had a great deal of trouble with the brightness of the lights. They were nearly blinded by them! Also, the fixtures didn't have lens on them and there was no good way to attach them.
Michael Messing
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Quote:
On 2009-12-18 08:21, Alan Munro wrote:
Also, the fixtures didn't have lens on them and there was no good way to attach them.


Just so it's clear, I'm not recommending work lights. I am talking about quartz video lighting like this:
http://tinyurl.com/Smith-Victor

This type of light comes with a 600-watt bulb and a safety glass. The key to keep the brightness from causing too much discomfort on your audience volunteers is to have the light high enough that it is not directly in their eyes but overhead (just like traditional theatrical lighting.) The brightness complaint is interesting to me. I read about it a lot but it's not much different from a theater follow spot. If you're using a spot light, the audience member won't be able to see either.

When I was in theater classes, they always said "if you can see your audience, the light isn't bright enough!"
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