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jazzy snazzy
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run off by a mob of Villagers wielding
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Those things are harsh, hot, unsafe and unstable. Been using them for over 40 years for video/film production and never,ever considered performing with them.
For production, we had to carry a vast array of diffusers, soft boxes, gels, sand bags, extra lamps and on and on.

If you can possibly afford it, go with the new generation of LED fixtures.
They run cool, around 40w, last 100,000 hours and are DMX controllable.
You still have those ugly stands to contend with but no one will sue you for 3rd degree burns or fire. The cost evens out over time.

Here are some examples;
http://www.starlight.com/LEDpar64.html
http://www.chauvetlighting.com
"The secret of life is to look good from a distance."
-Charles Schulz
Alan Munro
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Kentwood, Michigan, USA
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Quote:
On 2009-12-18 09:50, Michael Messing wrote:
Quote:
On 2009-12-18 08:21, Alan Munro wrote:
Also, the fixtures didn't have lens on them and there was no good way to attach them.


Just so it's clear, I'm not recommending work lights. I am talking about quartz video lighting like this:
http://tinyurl.com/Smith-Victor

This type of light comes with a 600-watt bulb and a safety glass. The key to keep the brightness from causing too much discomfort on your audience volunteers is to have the light high enough that it is not directly in their eyes but overhead (just like traditional theatrical lighting.) The brightness complaint is interesting to me. I read about it a lot but it's not much different from a theater follow spot. If you're using a spot light, the audience member won't be able to see either.

When I was in theater classes, they always said "if you can see your audience, the light isn't bright enough!"

I used Smith-Victor video lights, but the used set that I had could have used lens if I used the barn doors, but the audience would have been shellshocked as the lights heated. I did raise them, but the stands only allowed the lights to be brought to 8'. I didn't have trouble with the brightness, but the volunteers looked right into them as if by reflex.

I'd use LEDs if the price was much better and there was room to place them in the small banquet rooms. I've performed in facilities where square footage was rationed. I had to squeeze between tables! Luckily, those facilities have little repeat business.
Autumn Morning Star
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In suggesting the new LED theatrical lights, do you think they are bright
enough? I have seen them in action and it seems to takes a number of them,
and they aren't cheap.

Anybody use them in their show?
Wonder is very necessary in life. When we're little kids, we're filled with wonder for the world - it's fascinating and miraculous. A lot of people lose that. They become cynical and jaded, especially in modern day society. Magic renews that wonder.
Doug Henning
miscoes
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Allariz, Spain
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Definitely NOT. Led par cans give intense color and are light and easy to use and carry.

I use 8 and they draw only 30 Watts (every unit) so they are really usable in household power outlets.

BUT...

They don't give enough white light to flood my stage so I carry also several PAR 64 1000W units.

In Spain we use 220V so we can usually draw 2500W from every power outlet.
Autumn Morning Star
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Thanks! I have floods and spots, so this might work well.
Wonder is very necessary in life. When we're little kids, we're filled with wonder for the world - it's fascinating and miraculous. A lot of people lose that. They become cynical and jaded, especially in modern day society. Magic renews that wonder.
Doug Henning
Bill Palmer
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Recently, one of the big consumer lighting companies has run a page of information concerning LED lights and the fallacies associated with them. You might want to check this page out, because it has extensive links to various testing groups, etc.

http://www.1000bulbs.com/pg/LEDThePromisePerformance/

I don't know why ANYONE these days would be considering using incandescent bulbs. They are hot, dangerous and expensive. I used them back when that was all that we had other than quartz/halogen, which were hot, dangerous and cheap.

I recently started using very bright studio lighting in my photography. I found some really wonderful, very bright bulbs at one of my local photo vendors, and have used them quite a bit. These are made by EiKO. They are large CFL bulbs. The bases require ventilation, but the bulbs remain quite cool. They produce the equivalent of 350 - 400 watts of very clean, white light -- about 5000 degrees Kelvin. They have a very long lifetime. There are other brands of CFL photo bulbs out there as well.

As long as you keep the packaging they come in, they are easy to transport without breaking.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

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