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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Magical equations » » Your Favorite Math Principle/Trick (1 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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highmagic
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Thanks Scott - I'll check Gardner's book for the final part
Scott Cram
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Here's yet another cool mathemagical principle!

Check out Lewis Jones' "The Pattern Principle" in Steve Beam's "Semi-Automatic Card Tricks, Vol. 3". The principle itself isn't a math principle, however, it would be next to impossible for it to work if the mathematics of it weren't worked out properly.

Basically, it minimizes the work required to remember the order of the colors in the deck.

One read through the principle, and the included effects, "Red Alert 1, 2, 3 & 4," and I was well, like this: Smile

There's some great & unexplored potential in the "Pattern Principle".
domclarke
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"Reversal" in Banachek's Psychological Subtleties.
landmark
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Here's a mentalism effect from Buckley's Gems of Mental Magic that uses a math idea that very few know. The effect, called Devious Digits as described by Buckley:

Here is a miracle in which a number that runs into the quintillions is reached by multiplication of a random selection of numbers. Yet a spectator who calls a friend of the performer by telephone is given this long number accurately while it is being worked out by the assistant in the room.

The multiplication involves a 15-digit number times any number from one to thirteen. While the first number is not really random, the second is freely selected. It's a killer!
landmark

Another favorite old-time gag is the Piano Card Trick from Royal Road. Though simple, it's amazing how many people you can fool with it if you present it as a sleight of hand trick.
landmark
riberts
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Quote:
On 2003-05-13 18:38, Magictrickster wrote:
My favorite mathematical effect is the use of a calculator to generate a number, which I use as a book test. A spectator types in, say, any three digit number then multiplies it by any other three digit number then presses the equal key to produce an answer which leads to the page, line and word in a book. The number is of course one I've pre-selected. Please message be privately if you'd like to know how to do this (you need a scientific calculator to do it).

Brian.


I agree Brian it's a good effect. There's a similar use of this principal used by Roger Curzon (from Sheffield's Magick) in his booklet "Blood on the Tricks".

Effect is
- a spectator 'shuffles' a packet of 9 differently numbered cards;
- 1 or 2 spectators randomly generate a number using a calculator

The 9 cards when dealt out form the 9 digit number generated. Not a math effect per se, but very powerful - can be dressed up as either (im)probability of events occurring, the power of the subconscious etc, etc...


Cheers
Ben Blau
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Lately I've been doing a lot of work with Bob Hummer's "3 object divination" principle. It's very versatile. A good description is in Bill Simon's Mathematical Magic book.

Ben Blau
Magicmike1949
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There's a trick in Scarne on Card tricks, with a name I don't recall, that's very good. The spectator shuffles the deck. Upon getting it back, you ribbon spread it face up and get a quick look at the third card from the bottom as you show that the cards are well mixed. Now write a prediction and keep it face down on the table, which names this card. Have someone reach into deck and pull out any ten cards (except for the bottom 3). Now mix those ten up and have someone pick any 4 of them & turn them face up. Now if you can, for each of those 4 cards transfer enough cards from the top to bottom to make each one equal ten. E.g., if a 3 shows, transfer 7 cards to the bottom, if a 10 or face card shows, don't transfer any. If you can do this without visibly counting so much the better, but sometimes I do it openly. Then look at the 4 cards that were selected from the 10. Add their values. Openly deal that number face up but stop when you get to the number and hold that card face down. Turn over your prediction and show it. Now turn over the card. They will match.
bobmcmathman
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Does anybody else use Gardner's cube root and fifth root 'calculations'? I find people seem to enjoy these as an amazing demonstration of memory. (I don't present them as lightning calculations, but instead patter about how I have been honing my memory by memorizing tables of roots.) I usually precede this with some actual easy calculations of squares of 2-digit numbers ending in 0 or 5.
Nir Dahan
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Cube and fifth root are great demonstrations especially to an audience who is more mathematically oriented.
If you can do other mental calculations using logarithms for instance, it absolutely kills.
stick
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By far the best trick using mathematics is to be found in the “Royal Road to Card Magic”, page 148 and is called “An Incomprehensible Divination.”
It kills laymen and some magicians. I have used it for years.
Gianni
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Quote:
On 2003-05-29 12:59, Scott Cram wrote:
My favorite principle would have to be the binary principle, as employed in Leo Boudreau's books - "Spirited Pasteboards", "Skullduggery" and so on.

The best application of this principle, in my mind, is his effect "Murder Most Foul".


Can anyone advise where this effect might be available?

Gianni
Scott Cram
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Quote:
On 2003-10-11 21:59, Gianni wrote:
Quote:
On 2003-05-29 12:59, Scott Cram wrote:
My favorite principle would have to be the binary principle, as employed in Leo Boudreau's books - "Spirited Pasteboards", "Skullduggery" and so on.

The best application of this principle, in my mind, is his effect "Murder Most Foul".


Can anyone advise where this effect might be available?

Gianni


The only place "Murder Most Foul" is available is in the book "Skullduggery", by Leo Boudreau. His books are somewhat hard to find, but they will be available eventually from Lybrary.com.

They've recently received permission from Mr. Boudreau to republish his books in electronic form, but it will take time to convert them.
Gianni
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Scott, many thanks for the prompt and informative reply.

Gianni
DaveS
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Quote:
On 2003-05-29 12:59, Scott Cram wrote:
My favorite principle would have to be the binary principle, as employed in Leo Boudreau's books - "Spirited Pasteboards", "Skullduggery" and so on.

I've never seen a mathematical principle that can make tricks appear to be so close to mind reading. Leo's ingenuity in applying these principles really make the book.

The best application of this principle, in my mind, is his effect "Murder Most Foul". The spectator randomly selects, from a list of 64 possibilities, a murderer, a murder victim, a weapon, and a location. The spectator does this silently, and nothing is written down. Without so much as a single question, you instantly divine the exact murder scenario they have chosen.

Scott,
Are Leo's books still in print? If not, where can I learn this effect? Thanks.
DaveS
We shall not cease from exploration/And the end of all our exploring/Will be to arrive where we started/And know the place for the first time. (TS Elliot)
Scott Cram
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See my Oct 11, 2003, 11:21pm post. I don't believe they're still in print, but you can find them if you hunt. Keep your eyes peeled towards Lybrary.com, in order to find the upcoming electronic versions of them.
rickmagic1
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One that hasn't been mentioned but I've been utilizing for some time is Osterlind's Breakthrough Card System (if that qualifies).

Rick
Richard Green
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Host of the Haunted Magic show at House of Cards Nashville!
landmark
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Aronson's Undo Influence card principle is one of those principles that even when you try it out for yourself, you fool yourself. It seems it can't possibly work--yet it does, every time.

Jack Shalom
adolphus
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I used to do the cube root thing in my first performances - I forgot if I learned it from Kaye or Corinda.
While some mention Hummer's 3 object divination, I found that the next effect in Gardner's "Math, magic and mystery" more to my taste. It was Yate's FOUR object divination, using disguised parity or binary switching.
I've used it over the phone (once on a friend's girlfriend who just HAD to call me after she participated in one of my shows!) Smile
The end effect is that I have them hold their hands over two, last objects (i.e. coins) and I can mysteriously tell them under which hand their previously chosen object is! She freaked!
"Unlike the mere Conjuror, the Mentalist reaches into that space which a hat normally covers. And from there, he withdraws something more fleeting - and at times, far fuzzier - than any rabbit"
LobowolfXXX
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My favorite principle is the principle of restricted choice, which relates to bridge, not to magic. It's based on a similar idea to the old "Let's Make a Deal" show. Briefly: Three closed doors; behind one is a new car, behind the other two are rocks. After you pick a door, you're going to be shown a rock. So, you pick your favorite door. Before you get to see what's behind the door you chose, the host shows you a door you DIDN'T pick, and behind it is...a rock. Now, you may keep your original choice, or switch for the other unopened door. Better to keep the first choice, to switch, or is it a toss-up? If you're unfamiliar with this problem, it can be very counter-intuitive. It has strong practical application at the bridge table.
"Torture doesn't work" lol
Guess they forgot to tell Bill Buckley.

"...as we reason and love, we are able to hope. And hope enables us to resist those things that would enslave us."
Turk
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Quote:
On 2003-05-23 22:14, joseph wrote:
On a simpler note, Overkill by Paul Harris is pretty cool, & Paul Gertner's Unshuffled. Both rely on nice principles. Smile


Joseph,

I must regretfully forget "Unshuffled" and just watch admiringly as others perform the necessary faro shuffles to accomplish the same.

As for Paul Harris's "Overkill", I seem to recall this effect but can't remember where I read about it. Is it in one of his early books? Please don't say "AofA". <G>

Thanks for the info.

Mike
Magic is a vanishing Art.

This must not be Kansas anymore, Toto.

Eschew obfuscation.
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