The Magic Caf
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The words we use » » Silent Scripts: Magic and Showmanship-Henning Nelms (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

mleskanic
View Profile
Regular user
152 Posts

Profile of mleskanic
In Magic and Showmanship by Henning Nelms, Henning talks a bit about having a silent script to stay in character. I think this is a very smart idea. I am unsure however if it is necessary during a manipulation routine.

What do you guys think? Should I have a silent script for a card and billiard ball manipulation routine?


Thanks,
Matt
puppeterry
View Profile
Regular user
Sanger, CA
114 Posts

Profile of puppeterry
Matt,
Your silent script (in acting, I use the term subtext) depends a lot on your character. Are you surprised by a change or production? Are you relieved that you reached your goal? Are you being thwarted by magical forces you sought to control?
Your magic has to have an effect on your character to have an effect on your audience.
TV Mc Arthur
The Librician
Fresno (CA) County Public Library
"They don't get better.....just faster."
JackScratch
View Profile
Inner circle
2151 Posts

Profile of JackScratch
Do you believe character is unimportant in a manipulation routine? I believe it is even more important. If you do not engage your audience, nothing could be more tedious than watching you juggle items.
Big Daddy Cool
View Profile
Inner circle
1598 Posts

Profile of Big Daddy Cool
Ditto.
We'll catch ya on the Back of the Cereal Box!
John Pyka
www.johnpyka.com
JamesTong
View Profile
Eternal Order
Malaysia
11213 Posts

Profile of JamesTong
Quote:
On 2009-03-03 23:18, JackScratch wrote:
Do you believe character is unimportant in a manipulation routine? I believe it is even more important. If you do not engage your audience, nothing could be more tedious than watching you juggle items.


Yes, I fully agree too.
Lawrence O
View Profile
Inner circle
Greenwich (CT)
6799 Posts

Profile of Lawrence O
It is an easy trick to figure out that you have a certain bizarre hat (colonial helmet, baseball cap, fedora, yacht captain's cap, Sherlock Holmes cap, Navy bob, American football helmet...) which doesn't match the character's admitted role: psychologically matching the ambiguity give a lot of matter to the character. For example the performer acting as a psychologist mentally wears an American football helmet, or the seaman doing rope tricks figures out that he wears a Sherlock Holmes cap...
The non admitted incongruity is actually a very creative designing method to great characters.

This is a smart way to input showmanship in the silent script. By the way, Tommy Wonder in his Books Of Wonders suplies subtle advice regarding the silent script.
Magic is the art of proving impossible things in parallel dimensions that can't be reached
George Ledo
View Profile
Magic Café Columnist
SF Bay Area
2980 Posts

Profile of George Ledo
Quote:
On 2009-03-03 23:18, JackScratch wrote:
If you do not engage your audience, nothing could be more tedious than watching you juggle items.

Another vote for this comment.
That's our departed buddy Burt, aka The Great Burtini, doing his famous Cups and Mice routine
www.georgefledo.net

Latest column: "Sorry about the photos in my posts here"
Lawrence O
View Profile
Inner circle
Greenwich (CT)
6799 Posts

Profile of Lawrence O
... and another one
Magic is the art of proving impossible things in parallel dimensions that can't be reached
Bill Palmer
View Profile
Eternal Order
Only Jonathan Townsend has more than
24289 Posts

Profile of Bill Palmer
See if you can find a youtube video of Cardini. Watch it, then tell me what you think Cardini's answer would have been.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
mtpascoe
View Profile
Inner circle
1932 Posts

Profile of mtpascoe
Great example Bill. There is definitely subtext going on in Cardini's act. And if you re-read Magic and Showmanship I'm certain that Nelm's mentions that the silent script should be used for silent acts.
jackturk
View Profile
Elite user
463 Posts

Profile of jackturk
You can find similar relevant insights on this topic
Steve Martin's autobiography, "Born Standing Up" -- he
talks at great length about the duality of what's going
on in his head, versus what the audience sees and hears,
as well as the ongoing effort to constantly evaluate both
his own performance and the audience's reaction to it.

Moving aware from the profound to a very personal and
mundane example...

That "inner script" is extremely important to me in my
act particularly when I'm working with my Rabbit-in-Hat
puppet. For the bits to work at maximum effectiveness...
and to get past the initial kid cries of "it's a puppet"...
I have to believe with all my heart and soul that the
dang rabbit has it in for me.

So when I look that bundle of fur, stitching, and glue
in its beady little plastic eyes, I am believing at my
very core that I'm dealing with a snarky little fiend
who needs to be taught a lesson.

And when I can do that whole-heartedly, it definitely makes
all the difference to the routine.

I'm certain Nelms would suggest we approach every single
routine with exactly the same level of total inner
commitment.

--Jack
"59 Ways To Recession Proof Your Entertainment Business -- FREE!"
http://www.GetLeadsLikeCrazy.com

"How To Make $25,000 a Year Doing Birthday Parties Part-Time"
http://www.magicmarketingcenter.com/birthdayPT
JNeal
View Profile
Inner circle
I used to have 999 posts, now I have
1553 Posts

Profile of JNeal
I might suggest that Cardini DIDN"T use a 'silent' script, because in most of his performances he actually muttered commentary to himself! YOu can actually here it on the Christopher special. Of course, the concept is the same..even if it isn't always silent!
visit me @ JNealShow.com
Michael Landes
View Profile
New user
76 Posts

Profile of Michael Landes
Quote:
On 2009-02-24 22:23, mleskanic wrote:
In Magic and Showmanship by Henning Nelms, Henning talks a bit about having a silent script to stay in character. I think this is a very smart idea. I am unsure however if it is necessary during a manipulation routine.

What do you guys think? Should I have a silent script for a card and billiard ball manipulation routine?


Thanks,
Matt



Tommy Wonder addressed this issue in his lecture.
He would say, "Do you like this sort of magic?"
and then he would do the classic manipulative sequence in which
the performer takes a pack out of its case, whereupon the case seems to have vanished,
whereupon the deck seems to have vanished,...only to reappear back in the case.
a classic bit. And he performed it beautifully.

whereupon, everyone would say at once, "Yeah!"
to which tommy would frown a little and say, "Really? Well, I don't"
It doesn't mean anything. just a bunch of ....stuff. I prefer this.."

Then he would do the very same sequence, but with a silent script in place.

the difference was so huge we were all quite mortified to have praised the original version.

always a good teacher. Smile
thethirteensteps
View Profile
New user
54 Posts

Profile of thethirteensteps
Does anyone know if Tommy Wonder talked about silent scripting with close up magic? It seems from routines like his wild card that he used it, but he was also very responsive to the reactions of the people in front of him. I guess he silent scripted it but also kept it loose, but I'm sure he had insights beyond that.
Moncle
View Profile
New user
United Kingdom
41 Posts

Profile of Moncle
Quote:
On 2013-12-15 14:52, thethirteensteps wrote:
Does anyone know if Tommy Wonder talked about silent scripting with close up magic? It seems from routines like his wild card that he used it, but he was also very responsive to the reactions of the people in front of him. I guess he silent scripted it but also kept it loose, but I'm sure he had insights beyond that.


In answer to that question, he absolutley did, there's a part in his book where he describes a ball vanishing and what is going through his mind as it happens. Derren Brown refers to this technique in Absolute Magic, quoting Tommy's example.

I use it to make my magic much more believable, the plot leads your thoughts and feelings, instead of trying to act a reaction you try and feel the emotion of what has happened then your natural expression comes through and makes your magic more real.

You find yourself dancing with your spectators emotions, Tommy also talks about emotional involvement, or was Darwin Ortiz.

Anyway it is refreshing to discuus elements of performane. Thank you posters.

Michael
ApprenticeWizard
View Profile
Regular user
Charlottesville, VA
170 Posts

Profile of ApprenticeWizard
I was just wondering if anyone has any suggestions on combining silent scripts and regular scripts. I try to script everything I perform and sometimes I add some words or thoughts in brackets as reminders of what I want to be imagining at that point in the routine. I guess that is an example of "silent scripting." How would you go about creating and learning such a combination? Also, where can one find the best explanation of silent scripting (with examples) and instructions on how to use it (without overloading your memory circuits)?
Magically yours,
Tom Olshefski
pf70ds
View Profile
New user
34 Posts

Profile of pf70ds
A silent script helps you believe in your magic and keeps you in character at all times
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The words we use » » Silent Scripts: Magic and Showmanship-Henning Nelms (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2022 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.02 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL