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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » Best sponge ball routine? (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Thales
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I have to say that Sponge by Jay Noblezada is outstanding for someone like myself that did not have any sponge experience. It does a really good job of teaching the basics, going over each move a number of times slowly and from different directions. Plus, it has a few good routines to get you going and, of course, the section with Darwin is filled with lots of great advice and moves. And Jay does the routines in the streets for different people at least five times, which really gives you a good idea how to handle the spectators and how to flow the routines, etc.

I also have 'The World's Greatest Magic' DVD on sponges, but have yet to view it. I figure it will be a great complement to Sponge and give me a number of great routines to pick from.
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Michael J. Douglas
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I haven't used sponge balls in a long time, but have instead preferred the rabbits. When I used balls, it was a "basic" transfer in my hands, then in the spectator's hands, finishing with multiple balls.

I have the '25 Tricks with...' VHS and remember it being a good source for beginners. John Carney's "Current Classic" from 'Carneycopia' is a simple two-ball routine that has some nice touches. And, after reading about it here, I purchased Scott's PB&J routine, and it's an excellent, humorously-pattered three-ball routine that begins and ends clean.
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Lawrence O
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Bill Palmer is right (not unusual): I just didn't know who was the creator but didn't want to omit the effect from the list just on that account.

Thus, please know that I amended the list as follows...

Lesnik, Yuris: Puff the Magic Dragon, Latvia. (marketed item with ELMS) A sponge cube egg transforms into a cute baby dragon in the palm of your hand back and forth. With some serious practice this can be made really magical. Yuri also has a cube to dog, a cube to spider and other "formfoam" ideas that are really off the beaten path. Naturally these deserve a proper routine to make them really magical, but there are many members on the café that can supply ideas. These foam morphing ideas deserve being made in a very magical way rather than just pushing foam through to present the possibilities of a clever prop (possibly secretly switching the blocks to magically move the morphing from one transformer figure to another).

Dynamike, send me your routine, and I'll be delighted to add it to the list.

There are several good points on Jackhow14 routine on Japanese TV: I had not seen anyone do the cutting of one ball in two as presented there. This way to make the spectator participate in making a magical effect himself is very nice. Moving from the Big Ball to the Dr. Jaks' ending is also original. Now, I personally don't like Dr. Jaks' ending because the performer has to get his little balls back from the floor. I'm convinced that it did play some role in Eugene Burger dropping his whole routine as well. Like Bill Palmer, I don't like performing in and out of the mouth effect, but I thought that our friend does a good job with it, even if I resented the big lips (creative) idea as somehow prejudiced.
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ttorres
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Wow, Lawrence! I mean, WOW!
...the magic that creates Memories!
Davidmagicman
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That was a long list of sponge balls routines. I didn't know that it was so many.
Thanks, Lawrence. Now, will I study a few of them and see if I will add something from them to my act.

Posted: Nov 8, 2009 12:14am
Oops, I forgot to name which routine I think is best. I think it is Steve Dacri's routine because it is simple and very good and also gives a good reaction.
/

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Michael J. Douglas
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That was cute, Ian. Smile
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Quote:
On 2009-11-10 17:40, Michael J. Douglas wrote:
That was cute, Ian. Smile

There is an alternate routine that ends with a ball to bunny or ball to square. 4 stars in Genii, on the market since 1980.
Illusionist, Illusionist consulting, product development, stage consultant, seasoned performer for over 35 years. Specializing in original effects. Highly opinionated, usually correct, and not afraid of jealous critics. I've been a puppet, a pirate, a pawn and a King. Free lance gynecologist.
Lawrence O
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Bill is absolutely right, Yuris, I just could not find the name of the creator of these very nice little dragons and thought that maybe some magicians would use them to magically change a little sponge rabbit into a dragon for a different ending to the classic routine. So now in my notes it reads:

Lesnik, Yuris: Puff the Magic Dragon © Riga, Latvia. (marketed item with ELMS) A sponge cube egg transforms into a cute baby dragon in the palm of your hand

I also found in some old lecture notes:

Crandall, Senator: Entertaining With Magic © March 3 1952 by Senator Crandall, selfpublished and Lecture presented before The Magicians Guild Of America p 9 Sponge Ball Routine. The routine starts with two balls and the performer’s hands clearly holding nothing else. Then thanks to a very smart triangular misdirection structure, the performer is able to secretly steal a third ball from his right pocket. Then the two in the spectator’s hand is performed using again smart misdirection to steal a jumbo sponge ball from the left pocket. Then the two sponges are tabled and one is placed in the left thumb crotch, then the second one, before one (actually taking both) is placed into the pocket. The one remaining is revealed to have grown to 5 times its size. The routine is a lesson in sequential misdirection involving three location in sequence but focusing spectators on only two: this is a rarely used misdirection technique which has not been isolated as a specific technique but it's extremely deceptive.

Posted: Apr 24, 2010 7:32am
Also revised the reference on Willane

Willane [William H. Lane]: Methods for Miracles © 1953 by Rae Hammond (editor), London, UK, illustrated leaflet including “Willane's Intimate Sponge Ball Routine” & Complete Methods for Miracles © 1985 by Rae Hammond, Davenports, London, UK; the 14 leaflets in book form magnificently illustrated and with additional notes
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magiclimber
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I've been toying with the idea of using different size sponge balls (obviously not my idea, I think goshmans), and I really think it adds an interesting aspect to the routine. Plus, certain moves are easier to perform with different size balls.
Lawrence O
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Different size sponges started before Al and so did the variety in colors. He is however the one who made the line "one is always bigger than the other" famous ...
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Al Kazam the Magic Man
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Hi All,

Jack How's routine is on a very popular Taiwan TV variety show. The guy in the clip with the beard and cool looking sunnies is the host of the show. He does a lot of shows with magicians and sometimes even does some stuff by himself. At times the camera pans over to a couple of guys. These guys are quite famous magicians in Taiwan and appear and perform on TV quite regularly. Many of the girls in the clip there are entertainers or singers themselves.

I'm sure you could gather that he wasn't so much telling a story with his routine, but rather just saying I've put one ball here, how many in my hand etc.

JoJo <-------Lived in Taiwan for 16 years.
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motown
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Protons is a nice routine.

Before Goshman there really wasn't much choice in color the way there is now.
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Lawrence O
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Quote:
On 2010-04-24 13:48, motown wrote:
Protons is a nice routine.

Before Goshman there really wasn't much choice in color the way there is now.


No argument about Chris Priest's entertaining routine, but before Goshman there really wasn't as much choice in sponge ball either but Francis Douglas, a well known magician amongst others, did actually use different color balls.

Why should your understandable admiration for Chris Priest's performance drive you to place it on an exclusive pedestal? I doubt that it needs it.
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motown
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Lawerence,

you shouldn't read more in to something then what is really there.
And you shouldn't create a meaning that doesn't exist.
"If you ever write anything about me after I'm gone, I will come back and haunt you."
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Lawrence O
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Point granted.

However when you associate in the same post two statements (a true one and a debatable one), you will, I'am sure understand that there is a use for other members to understand if there is an ambiguity or not, a causal point or not, in this association: this isn't just you and me, it's a forum with many readers.
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TheAmbitiousCard
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Quote:
On 2009-11-04 15:52, Thales wrote:
I have to say that Sponge by Jay Noblezada is outstanding for someone like myself that did not have any sponge experience. It does a really good job of teaching the basics, going over each move a number of times slowly and from different directions. Plus, it has a few good routines to get you going and, of course, the section with Darwin is filled with lots of great advice and moves. And Jay does the routines in the streets for different people at least five times, which really gives you a good idea how to handle the spectators and how to flow the routines, etc.

I also have 'The World's Greatest Magic' DVD on sponges, but have yet to view it. I figure it will be a great complement to Sponge and give me a number of great routines to pick from.


In my opinion, "Sponge" was THE WORST DVD I've ever watched. I was shocked how little thinking went into the routines. ESPECIALLY for a teaching DVD. I found it HIGHLY IRRESPONSIBLE.

Pat Page's DVD is so much better in terms of actually how to do a routine that the nosebleeda DVD seems like a crime.

The lack of consideration given to many of the required elements of a good magic routine was just awful.

And to have the gall to call that DVD "the last word on sponge balls" is irresponsible, thoughtless and 100% wrong. What a shame for a beginner to purchase it and think.. "well, that is ALL I need to know. Boy am I good!".


Personally, I find John Carney's to be extremely practical for walk-around type magic. The explanation goes into great detail on how to actually do the routine properly and responsibly.

Scott's PBJ is also very well written and explained.
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magiclimber
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No surprise here with penguin's outrageous claims.

I second Carney's, although I've only studied it.
rawdawg
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I'm rather partial to Meir Yerdid's "Color Blind Froggies" that he once posted on his website.
One time, when I was young, I botched a sleight so bad, Vernon, Marlo & Miller rolled over in their graves. But I didn't see Elmsley, probably because he was behind the others.
Lawrence O
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Quote:
On 2010-04-26 19:37, magiclimber wrote:
No surprise here with penguin's outrageous claims.

I second Carney's, although I've only studied it.


For Roger Klause's sponge to the spectator's sleeve phase in John's routine, try and use a Sanada Gimmick instead of the TT. The economy of movement is real and makes the routine flaw even better
Magic is the art of proving impossible things in parallel dimensions that can't be reached
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