The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Table hoppers & party strollers » » Interview with a GM (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
Zack Smith
View Profile
New user
37 Posts

Profile of Zack Smith
Hey all,

So today I had my first interview for a restaurant. I feel as though it went OK. However, I was SUPER nervous. I normally get somewhat nervous before performing at a party, but today my hands were super cold and shaky. It was great because the GM had me sit (it was a RR by the way) while he tended to some other issues. I sat for about 5 minutes constantly doing cuts, sybil, and some other sleights. While I was waiting one of the waitress's saw my practicing and smiled. SO naturally I went over and started doing tricks for her. I did a couple tricks and while performing two card monte, the GM came back, right at the climax when I pulled the 2 cards out of my back pocket and the girl got very excited!

So the GM and I went and sat down where we chatted (briefly) and he asked what kind of magic tricks I do. I asked if I could show him, he obliged so I performed 5 speed by Chris Kenner. He seemed to enjoy himself, but I was still nervous. We sat back down and he asked if I had ever worked at a RR before, and I told him I hadn't. He then asked what my going rate was. I told him it was $50 an hour but it was also negotiable. I am not set on $50, but I was just nervous and sort of blurted it out... I also told him that if that was the rate I was being payed I had no problem splitting tips with the wait staff.

And that was basically it. I took notes on Christopher Lyle's post, and I wish, in retrospect, I would have said something about a "test out" night, but I was so nervous it slipped my mind. Anyone have any advice. I know this is my first interview and it is definitely a learning experience. So any advice or tips are warmly welcomed. Thanks guys I appreciate all the help thus far.

Zack
Christopher Lyle
View Profile
Inner circle
Dallas, Texas
5698 Posts

Profile of Christopher Lyle
Zack,

Let me say that pitching a restaurant is NOT EASY! The more you do it, the easier it will become. There's a science to it....much like performing. You can read all the books you want on how to do magic, but you don't become seasoned until you GO OUT THERE and do it. The same is true of pitching the restaurant. You can read all this advice on here, read all the books you can on Restaurant Magic and until you get out there and DO IT, it's going to be a tough road.

Here are my thoughts (meant to make you better so please take my comments as positive)...



Quote:

So today I had my first interview for a restaurant. I feel as though it went OK. However, I was SUPER nervous. I normally get somewhat nervous before performing at a party, but today my hands were super cold and shaky. It was great because the GM had me sit (it was a RR by the way) while he tended to some other issues.



A buddy of mine use to take a shot of Jack before going to pitch a restaurant. He did this to calm his nerves. I'm not saying do this (actually...I would NOT DO THIS), but the point is to do whatever you need to do to be in control of yourself. I could be pitching a restaurant, or about to walk into a living room to perform at a bday party, or I could be going on stage to perform in front of 12,000 people. I do not get nervous!

I believe that nerves has to do with "lack of confidence" in what you're selling or what your performing. Again...the more you do this, the more confident in your product you'll be and the less you'll be "shakey."


Quote:

I sat for about 5 minutes constantly doing cuts, sybil, and some other sleights. While I was waiting one of the waitress's saw my practicing and smiled. SO naturally I went over and started doing tricks for her. I did a couple tricks and while performing two card monte, the GM came back, right at the climax when I pulled the 2 cards out of my back pocket and the girl got very excited!



RED ALERT!!!!! DO NOT EVER perform for staff at the restaurant. That shows the GM that you'll be a big distraction to the staff who should be working! If they ask to see a trick, politely decline and tell them that you're there for the customers. It might seem a little rude even if you're being polite, but I guarentee the BOSS will appreciate that.

Quote:

So the GM and I went and sat down where we chatted (briefly) and he asked what kind of magic tricks I do. I asked if I could show him, he obliged so I performed 5 speed by Chris Kenner.



This is another common mistake people make. Unless the GM asks for a demo, don't give one to him. He asked you what you did...he never asked you to show him. Sounds like it "may" have worked in your favor, but as a rule, don't perform for the GM during the interview process. What if you only have the opportunity to do ONE trick. During the trick, you mess up, or they bust you, or they just don't like the trick...do you think they'll book you now?

Here's my line when asked "so what type of magic do you perform?" :

"I perform sophisticated sleight of hand magic. with everyday objects such as cards, coins, money, ropes, string, cups and balls, finger rings, car keys, sharpie markers, writing pens, silks, and rubber bands. Basically, magic with every day objects. Everthing is completely self contained. I just show up and I'm ready. I don't carry around a table or anything, so there's no worry of me getting in the way."

Quote:

He then asked what my going rate was. I told him it was $50 an hour but it was also negotiable. I am not set on $50, but I was just nervous and sort of blurted it out... I also told him that if that was the rate I was being payed I had no problem splitting tips with the wait staff.



WOW!!! A double whammy here! Why would he ever want to pay $50 per hour if he knows that it's negotiable. I can guarentee you that if you're booked, he's going to try and undercut you...b/c you gave him the option.

AND you offered to split your tips with the waitstaff...BAD IDEA!!! I know some may disagree with me on this, but you're there providing a service that the wait staff cannot do. Why share your money? Are THEY sharing their tips with you? Of course not.

So here's the GOOD NEWS! If for nothing else, you have gotten a great learning experience from all this and will learn what not to do in the future.

For me, my time at Red Robin was pure HELL! I got a phone call from them about 4 months ago asking me if I would come back and I quickly declined! It was a new manager but I simply told him the damage had been done. I'll never perform in another Red Robin, nor will I eat at a Red Robin.

I know Magic Steve had a blast performing at his, so I do wish you the best at this location should you land the gig.

Keep us posted...

Christopher
In Mystery,


Christopher Lyle
Magician, Comic, Daredevil, and Balloon Twisting Genius
For a Good Time...CLICK HERE!
pearljamjeff
View Profile
Inner circle
I live inside your computer.
1243 Posts

Profile of pearljamjeff
To add a bit of a different perspective to what Chris posted (about nerves), I think "nerves" are all in the mind of the beholder. I get nervous every time I perform magic, play music, or speak in public... but I LOVE performing and being in front of people. I don't think this has anything to do with confidence or fear, not for me personally. And I've been told I'm a natural performer. Some people just get nervous, and I think it's wonderful. I really do. For me, it's more about creating the anticipation and the desire to do my best in every situation.

I personally think that nervous energy can be channeled into a feeling of EXCITEMENT that you can transmit to your audience. Like I said, I DO get nervous, and I hope that will never stop happening for me. This is because when I get nervous, I purposefully remind myself that this is my body's way of reminding me to do my best. I turn the butterflies in my stomach into a vehicle for creating this same sensation in my audience.

Chris' perspective is extremely valuable and by no means am I trying to discount it... just giving a slightly different take on things.


Rock,

Jeff
Jeff Travilla - Author of "The Extractor." I work in advertising and marketing now. If you are a professional worker and need marketing help, feel free to contact my company. JCM Media Group.
Christopher Lyle
View Profile
Inner circle
Dallas, Texas
5698 Posts

Profile of Christopher Lyle
Well said Jeff! You said it better than I could...

Channel the nervous energy! Well said indeed!
In Mystery,


Christopher Lyle
Magician, Comic, Daredevil, and Balloon Twisting Genius
For a Good Time...CLICK HERE!
Zack Smith
View Profile
New user
37 Posts

Profile of Zack Smith
Hey guys,

Thanks so much for the input, I REALLY appreciate it. There is so much constructive comments I almost don't know where to start.


Nerves: I guess you could say I am one of those people who gets nervous because I worry about failure. I would humbly disagree about the lack of confidence, I am confident in my abilities as a magician and with my personality as a performer. I honestly feel that some of the greatest performers are best at being people and charismatically connecting with the audience, and I honestly feel that I do this... And I am not above taking a shot to cool my nerves =D

Performing for Staff: Honestly Chris (can I call you Chris?) I never thought of it in this way. Excellent point, I was just so nervous I felt like a good warm up would do me well, and it did, but next time I will perform on the street before entering. Thanks so much for that Chris, because I NEVER thought of it like that and I am the type of guy who would normally do tricks for anyone that asked. But this makes perfect sense and I appreciate you bringing this to my attention.

Performing for the GM: This too makes sense. If I had offered the free night (LIKE I SHOULD HAVE) it would have make sense for him to see what he was actually getting: magic for the guests.

Negotiation: I have mixed feelings about this... I don't want the wait staff to think that I am infringing on their tips, and I honestly don't think that I would. I feel that they would be making more because I would be bringing more people into the restaurant, exciting them with magic, and they would be happier to tip.

So this is the part where I get a little nervous, how much is too much? I understand the concept ask for what you are worth. And I think I am worth $50, but would be willing to work for less... Of course the more the better. So what do you guys think, should I ask next time "how much would you pay" or should I say "the going rate is $30 to $50..." What do you guys think. Because just like you guys said, this is a learning experience and I really want to get as much away from today as I can.



Jeff, I really appreciate what you said about nerves. I feel the same way. I wrestled in college and I was always nervous and always tried to turn that into positive energy to reach success.

Thank you guys again and I really appreciate further feedback from you all.


Zack
pearljamjeff
View Profile
Inner circle
I live inside your computer.
1243 Posts

Profile of pearljamjeff
As far as negotiating your rate, I'll keep it quick... Name your rate and then stop talking. If you think you are worth $50 an hour, say so, and then SILENCE! If they want to negotiate, they will. You do not need to tell them that. An interesting rule from my days in sales and recruiting in the healthcare world is that after mentioning the price, the first one to speak "loses."

Let me play the part of mind reader... at your interview, you mentioned your rate, there was silence, and then you said, "But it's negotiable." Am I right? Or at least close to right? To quote my old boss, "Name your price and shut up!" lol... This is close to the right way of doing things. After doing so, gauge their response. If they totally shut down (body language), it's time to "wiggle." If they are hesitating, it's time to negotiate, but let them start the conversation. If they say nothing... WAIT... They are considering many things at this point and you need to allow them the opportunity to do so. When they do finally say something, take control and use it in your favor.

So in conclusion... where are things at, currently, with Red Robin and the manager you interviewed with? This gig is already yours if you want it badly enough, and we're all going to help you get it.
Jeff Travilla - Author of "The Extractor." I work in advertising and marketing now. If you are a professional worker and need marketing help, feel free to contact my company. JCM Media Group.
Skip Way
View Profile
Inner circle
3771 Posts

Profile of Skip Way
All excellent advice. A couple of alternative points and tips:

As Chris said, confidence comes from experience. I've always found it easier to simply be myself when approaching a GM. I love entertaining and that passion just seems to flow when I'm auditioning. I think that's my top selling point. As Jeff suggested, empower that passion with your nervousness.

I find that I constantly overlook things when talking to a prospect; even today. I just get so wrapped up in the moment that I forget my objectives. When talking to a client on the phone, I use a sales script outline to insure that I touch each vital point. FOr live interviews, I use a small 3x5 card version. I moved this list to my Blackberry once, but found it gave the impression that I was more interested in my phone than what the client was saying and quickly went back to the card. Consider this idea to keep track of your sales points, such as the live two hour audition.

On negotiating, Jeff and Chris said it all and did so beautifully. You're worth what you say you're worth. State your value with confidence and zip it. Smile I strongly recommend Michael Ammar's book, The Magic of Michael Ammar, for this. One of the last chapters is his essay on the art of negotiation for magicians. This material is (in my opinion) worth the price of the book alone.

Finally, on tips. I explain to my managers that I passively discourage tipping. I do, however, accept offered tips as the gifts and compliments they are intended to be so as not to offend the guest. I leave it at that during the interview.

After I'm contracted, I make a point of quietly bringing a selection of mixed bite-size candies for the staff each week. This costs me around $10 a week (a fraction of my usual tips) at the local warehouse club. The gesture "gives back" to the staff in a way that is appreciated and anticipated. I've never once had a server complain about or begrudge my tips. Small gestures mean a lot.

I also offer discounted birthday parties to staff's children as an added benefit. Managers like that. My opinion: Keep the tips, but give a little back. Become an indispensable part of the team.

Good luck on this, Zack! I actually enjoyed my time at Red Robin, but I'm a high energy TGI Fridays/Dave & Busters/Fudruckers kinda performer. One of my (in my opinion) best skills was entertaining multiple tables while giving each guest personal attention. Let us know how it goes!
How you leave others feeling after an Experience with you becomes your Trademark.

Magic Youth Raleigh - RaleighMagicClub.org
montymagi
View Profile
Special user
Slidell La
752 Posts

Profile of montymagi
I would like to jump in on this one. I love restaurant work. I like it better than the shows I get booked for even though they pay much more. When I pitch I work towards coming in for that first hour or two that I offer free. I seldom fail to get hired once I have come in. Charge what you are comfortable with. If you feel $50 an hour is too high, and it sounds like you were not comforable charging that, then charge less.

another idea is to have a free dinner thrown in as part of your pay that you can either eat or use to comp someone. The meal does not cost them much and you get your favorite dinner at least once a week. I work three nights a week and that is a lot of restaurant food so I will, from time to time, comp the meal of a regular or a friend that drops in with their family.

Working that first night is the same as "putting the product in the buyers hands". Take no tips the first night and just ask the people to let the manager know if they liked the idea and want to see you come back. After the first night I am with Christopher tips are part of your pay. If you want to make nice with the wait staff be a very good tipper yourself even when you get your meal to go. I also give a 25% discount on shows for the staff. I hope this helps.
Christopher Lyle
View Profile
Inner circle
Dallas, Texas
5698 Posts

Profile of Christopher Lyle
Quote:
On 2009-06-18 08:40, Skip Way wrote:

I actually enjoyed my time at Red Robin, but I'm a high energy TGI Fridays/Dave & Busters/Fudruckers kinda performer.



Never played a Dave and Busters before but I have played multiple locations of Fudds. THAT was a great place to play.

Just for claitity, my Red Robin experience was rare. Honestly, they should have just turned me down when I pitched it...but they didn't.

In a nutshell...

I pitched the restaurant and the GM told me that he hated Magicians. He'd worked with them at other restaurants he'd managed before and for whatever reason, he just hated them.

I should have walked away...but I didn't. I kept telling him that it's unfortunate that his experience wasn't better with the other entertainers, but perhaps this time would be different. For the sake of the customers, he said he'd give me a try.

After my first week, he came to me and said that he couldn't afford to pay me and that I could only work for tips. I told him that wasn't going to happen. That I'm worth what I charge. He kinda hooted about it for a bit and said, "well...ok, but I'm not super happy about it!" Let me tell you, I wasn't happy about the RR gig at this point. So far...everything had been very negative.

3 weeks later, he comes to me and says that I'm not making him any money and he's going to have to cut me loose. I told him that it takes more than 3 weeks...my service is an ongoing concepet that takes several months for word of mouth to get around about me performing at the restaurant. I also told him (as I told him in my early pitch) that it's not my job to "make him money." It's my job not to COST him money. The idea is that if I can bring in enough folks to make you break even on my fee, then you're getting free entertainment and ALL of your customers are entertained. If you happen to make a few bucks on me being here, then that's just icing on the cake!

He grunted and groaned about it and said, "well, I'll give you a few more weeks and if I don't see any noticable change, I'm going to drop you."

I should have just "walked" at that point...but I think I wanted this to work there more then he did. Why? Because the customers were GREAT at this location. They all wanted to see magic...nobody ever turned me away. It was great (from that aspect).

So now it's a few weeks later...a Sunday...FATHER'S DAY! I get an EMAIL from the GM. I'm going to copy and paste his EXACT EMAIL (I still have it saved):

>> Mr. Lyle,
Your services are no longer needed. I have taken your poster down. Come get it. <<

I have lost restaurants before. It happens. It's all part of the game and I'm aware of this going into it. But if you're going to let someone go, have the decency to call them into the office and do it face to face...or at the worst, call them on the phone and say it's over.

He dumped me in an email and on FATHERS DAY!

So I'm very sour on the Red Robin thing. I don't even like driving by other locations b/c I just remember the awful experience I had at this one. It's 3 months of my life I'll never get back.
In Mystery,


Christopher Lyle
Magician, Comic, Daredevil, and Balloon Twisting Genius
For a Good Time...CLICK HERE!
Magic_Steve
View Profile
Inner circle
Maryland
1476 Posts

Profile of Magic_Steve
Chris...

Sorry to hear about your experience there. Like you already mentioned though, I loved performing at my RR. The staff loved me (they even wanted me to come back after I left voluntarily), the guests were awesome, and it was a blast to perform there. Sounds like that GM never wanted it to work from the jump, which is a shame though.

On the issue of fees, I feel I have something beneficial to add, even though it's already been said. Confidence. Myself, I just bumped up my fees a bit, and this morning I booked one of my biggest shows ever, when considering $$$money$$$ earned versus time spent performing. Last night she came into Jasper's to catch my act. She asked my fee, and I told her without blinking an eye. Something I learned on here (from Dannydoyle no less), name your price AND SHUT UP. Put the ball in their court and let them be the first to talk. Don't try to justify it, make them think they're getting a good deal, nothing. Name your fee and then listen to the silence.

I remember when I booked RR, it was my very first restaurant, and my very first interview to try and get a restaurant. It took me 3 weeks to get the GM on the phone, and then another week to get the interview if I remember correctly. I actually had to get out of school early and my mom took me to the interview, lol. But it went well. I went in, introduced myself, she asked my fee (I undersold the gig at $25/hour, but that was fine for me at the time), and I offered to do a trial night. No magic, nothing. Granted, I was prepared with sponge balls. But she was entirely too busy. Anyways, I had to wait a few days to find out if I could even come in for the trial night, as there was a ton of red tape to cut through. But a few days later, she said it was a go. I went in there and performed for 2 hours on a Tuesday night...two days after my 16th birthday, lol.

More nervous I could not be, but I had a good time and the night was a huge success. She called me back the next day to let me know I got the gig and I could start next week. I was there for about 2 years and for the most part, it was a great restaurant to perform at. There were a few ups and downs in the beginning, but things eventually leveled out and it was smooth sailing.

It can be a tough gig to get though, and keep. My RR was a corporate owned one, so I think that in itself made it harder to book. But that could also be a reason why I was there for a while, through all the highs and lows of the restaurant. But I built up a good relationship with the GM (he's still there and I still go in there to eat) and would consider coming back if the opportunity ever presented itself.

Anyways though, good luck man. Be persistent and don't give up if this one doesn't work out for you. No one ever said booking a restaurant was easy, and I guess that's a good thing. It tends to keep the hacks out, lol.

Best.
Steve
Zack Smith
View Profile
New user
37 Posts

Profile of Zack Smith
Guys,


More GREAT advice and I would just like to say that it is GREATLY appreciated and I feel lucky to get such experienced advice.

So, where to start...

Jeff, Skip, Chris, Monty, and Steve all of you had the same great advice... State your rate and shut it. When I was in there, I stated $50/hr and there was that instant of silence which I shattered by my saying it was negotiable. All of you have the same tactic of pay negotiation and I think this speaks volumes about the success of you all as magicians. So thank you, I will DEFINITELY do this next time.

Skip, great ideas about treating the staff. I think that this is a great way to, like you said, make myself a irreplaceable member of the team. This is just good business all around. I like you am the performer of upbeat exciting places, and I really like your idea about the script. I think that I will make one of these and have it in my car while I warm up next time and read it right before I go in. This way I know what I want and it is fresh in my mind. Thanks for the help Skip.

Monty, the funny thing is that I was totally ready to offer a free night... However, I was too nervous and just forgot. I honestly feel like this is the first hump and because I have been through this one time, the rest will be easier, still challenging, but easier. And the more I think about it, the more I agree with you and Chris, my tips are my tips. I think I got this whole idea of splitting from Jay Sankey. Real Work on Restaurants and Bars is a great DVD with a lot of great ideas on the subject. I like Jay, but I am starting to disagree with him on the tip subject. I am starting to believe that if I am working in a restaurant, I am earning the tips, and the customer is going to be much more satisfied at the end of their meal, thus more likely to tip the waitstaff.

Steve, hearing about your patience and how long it took for you to get your RR gig really helped and put things in perspective. I have read from Chris that these things do take time, thanks for really laying it out for me.

I will be persistent, because this is something that I really want to do. I enjoy magic SO much and the idea of getting paid to do it for people in a restaurant is one of the greatest thoughts. I also feel very fortunate to find the magic Café. My mentor and fried who taught me magic moved to California for a job and I don't have anyone to talk about magic with, much less have very experienced pros giving me great advice. So I really appreciate all your help guys, and hopefully there is a time when I can make it up to you all by providing insight on a topic you guys are struggling with =D
twistedace
View Profile
Inner circle
philadelphia
3772 Posts

Profile of twistedace
The customer WILL tip the waiters and waitresses regardless. We are conditioned to do so. Could you imagine yourself NOT tipping after a sit down meal? If you earn a tip table hopping it's because of what you did well. I always told the customer when they asked "Do I have to pay for this?" "Absolutely not, this is a something special we do here at ____________ for our customers." This way, they know they're not OBLIGATED to pay you, but I received tips on a regular basis anyway and the waiters never complained. I worked 4 different restaurants for years and I've never had a problem.
pearljamjeff
View Profile
Inner circle
I live inside your computer.
1243 Posts

Profile of pearljamjeff
For chain restaurants like Red Robin, TGIFridays, etc... we could all coordinate information, if we are comfortable with the skill level of the performer we are recommending. For example, we know Zach is trying to get a job at a specific RR. If one of us (or a couple of us) also work at RR elsewhere and have great relationships with the GM, we could pass along a phone number to the GM in the proper city and explain, "A colleague of mine, another magician, is interested in working at the RR restaurant _insert_blank_. Do you have five minutes to call and tell this RR's GM about what our experience has been like together."

This could potentially go very far. However, there are negatives to consider when referring colleagues that we don't know much about. These are obvious, but I think the positives and negatives of this type of arrangement are worth considering.

Thoughts?
Jeff Travilla - Author of "The Extractor." I work in advertising and marketing now. If you are a professional worker and need marketing help, feel free to contact my company. JCM Media Group.
Christopher Lyle
View Profile
Inner circle
Dallas, Texas
5698 Posts

Profile of Christopher Lyle
I think that is an AWESOME idea!!!!
In Mystery,


Christopher Lyle
Magician, Comic, Daredevil, and Balloon Twisting Genius
For a Good Time...CLICK HERE!
Magic_Steve
View Profile
Inner circle
Maryland
1476 Posts

Profile of Magic_Steve
It's a good idea, but a lot of room for things to go wrong. I'm not sure I'd be willing to possibly taint an otherwise good relationship I have with built with said GM of a previous restaurant. I'll give an example...

So Magician1 asks GM1 of a previous restaurant to call and let GM2 know how good of an experience they had with restaurant magic. So GM1 calls GM2. GM1 had a very positive experience with restaurant magic and sells GM2 on the idea of it. Meanwhile, Magician1 sticks his neck out for Magician2, even though they've never met. So GM2 decides to go ahead with the magic, and Magician2 gets a job. Turns out, Magician2 is a terrible performer and gets many complaints from customers. GM2 fires him, then calls GM1 to let him know about the terrible experience. GM1 then is ****ed at Magician1 for making him look bad to GM2.

Sounds extreme, but it is a possible scenario. And on another note, the only ones that would benefit greatly from this idea would be the ones that have never pitched a restaurant, or probably performed in one either. We've all had to sell the idea of magic to restaurants we're currently at, and have performed at. It's not like it's impossible...it just takes practice. And on a personal level, I wouldn't feel comfortable asking anyone I don't know to make a recommendation for me. Who's to say their word is worth much in real life?

Just something to think about. Smile
Steve
pearljamjeff
View Profile
Inner circle
I live inside your computer.
1243 Posts

Profile of pearljamjeff
Steve, those are the exact downsides I was referring to. However, I think this would also be a potential opportunity to help grow the idea of magic throughout major restaurant chains. In order to lessen the chance for issues like Steve mentioned, Magician1 and Magician2 (the ones in Steve's example) should conference, talk, review video footage, and interview each other before one gives his recommendation.

This would definitely help for more than just those who are new to restaurants altogether. It could also benefit those changing restaurants, and like I said at the beginning, growing and selling the idea of magic as a benefit to customer satisfaction industry wide would be a potential benefit to every restaurant magician. I don't perform at restaurants myself currently but have enjoyed it in the past. However, marketing is what I do day in and day out. I think that with some thought, this could be set up in a very unilaterally beneficial manner. Just trying to point out some of the potential positive aspects to give us more to think about.
Jeff Travilla - Author of "The Extractor." I work in advertising and marketing now. If you are a professional worker and need marketing help, feel free to contact my company. JCM Media Group.
Zack Smith
View Profile
New user
37 Posts

Profile of Zack Smith
Jeff, I think it's a great idea. However, like Steve said there are many possible flaws. I think it is a good idea for those who have known each other for a little bit, and definitely exchange numbers and have a discussion. Great idea Jeff.

Zack

PS I am heading to the streets in a couple weeks after I get back from vacation and a good friend of mine is going to be filming. Portland has a big market on the weekends perfect for street work. I will be posting the vids if you guys want to check it out!
Magic_Steve
View Profile
Inner circle
Maryland
1476 Posts

Profile of Magic_Steve
Please, don't say "heading to the streets"...makes you sound like a 12 year old with a black tiger deck. LOL!

I know you're not, but in this business, it is all about perception. right? right?!? Smile
Skip Way
View Profile
Inner circle
3771 Posts

Profile of Skip Way
When I managed a chain restaurant, we had a national online bulletin board and a regional monthly newsletter that managers could submit tips and suggestions to. If Magi 1's GM is well satisfied with the benefits of having a performer in his store, Magi 1 might encourage him to post his positive comments and recommendations to the forum or newsletter. Heck, the progressive Magi would even write a draft of the comments for him. If enough satisfied GM's did this, it could give restaurant entertainers a very healthy boost. This might put these pro-entertainer thoughts into the head of other managers thereby benefiting performers nationwide.

I bounced this off of one of my chain GM's last night (Been there 6 years). This particular chain pulled the plug on entertainers a year ago and he fought to keep me. He doesn't want to buck company policies and making waves in a lifeboat surrounded by sharks is never a good idea, but he thinks our particular approach to family night might benefit other stores. We're discussing co-authoring an article on how to choose and best utilize a family entertainer for a future newsletter.

There are positive ways around the "Magi 1 promotes Magi 2 and gets bit in the tukhus" scenario. Think creatively.
How you leave others feeling after an Experience with you becomes your Trademark.

Magic Youth Raleigh - RaleighMagicClub.org
Zack Smith
View Profile
New user
37 Posts

Profile of Zack Smith
Steve,

Thanks for keeping me in check, I didn't realize I was sounding like a total D bag. =D There is a big market every week in Portland on the water front, I am just going to walk around there to get some videos.

Seriously guys, thanks so much for all your help and ideas, I can't emphasize that enough. I have NO ONE that lives near me that I can bounce ideas off of, I feel like I have been alone for so long!

Z
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Table hoppers & party strollers » » Interview with a GM (0 Likes)
 Go to page 1~2 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2020 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.36 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL