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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » 4th July (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Ratty Roberts
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Wel, here in UK we are sending up rockets & fire works to celebrate an American celebration .... 4th July. Unfortunatly the American independence wasn't actually signed until August. So why the 4th of July??
Slartibartfast
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Wait - you celebrate America's independence day in the UK? But you lost...

From Wikipedia:
During the American Revolution, the legal separation of the American colonies from Great Britain occurred on July 2, 1776, when the Second Continental Congress voted to approve a resolution of independence that had been proposed in June by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia. After voting for independence, Congress turned its attention to the Declaration of Independence, a statement explaining this decision, which had been prepared by a Committee of Five, with Thomas Jefferson as its principal author. Congress debated and revised the Declaration, finally approving it on July 4. A day earlier, John Adams had written to his wife Abigail:
“The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more.”

Adams' prediction was off by two days. From the outset, Americans celebrated independence on July 4, the date shown on the much-publicized Declaration of Independence, rather than on July 2, the date the resolution of independence was approved in a closed session of Congress.
If you can pull it off in a biker bar without being violated by a corn dog, more power to you.
-- Gwyd, the Unusual

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thorndyke
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I've been wondering about this. The original declaration is housed at the Smithsonian and lovingly cared for. Did the English get some sort of copy? Or was it just written, signed and kept at home and someone on an outbound ship taking several months to cross the Atlantic got told just before sailing; "oh, when you get there tell them we aren't in the club anymore."
Is there another copy sitting in England somewhere?
Darkfrog
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Quote:
On 2009-07-04 20:41, thorndyke wrote:
I've been wondering about this. The original declaration is housed at the Smithsonian and lovingly cared for. Did the English get some sort of copy? Or was it just written, signed and kept at home and someone on an outbound ship taking several months to cross the Atlantic got told just before sailing; "oh, when you get there tell them we aren't in the club anymore."
Is there another copy sitting in England somewhere?
Wikipedia again:

After Congress approved the final wording of the Declaration on July 4, a handwritten copy was sent a few blocks away to the printing shop of John Dunlap. Through the night between 150 and 200 copies were made, now known as "Dunlap broadsides". Before long, the Declaration was read to audiences and reprinted in newspapers across the thirteen states. The first official public reading of the document was by John Nixon in the yard of Independence Hall on July 8; public readings also took place on that day in Trenton, New Jersey, and Easton, Pennsylvania.[110] A German translation of the Declaration was published in Philadelphia by July 9.[111]

President of Congress John Hancock sent a broadside to General George Washington, instructing him to have it proclaimed "at the Head of the Army in the way you shall think it most proper".[112] Washington had the Declaration read to his troops in New York City on July 9, with the British forces not far away. Washington and Congress hoped the Declaration would inspire the soldiers, and encourage others to join the army.[113] After hearing the Declaration, crowds in many cities tore down and destroyed signs or statues representing royalty. An equestrian statue of King George in New York City was pulled down and the lead used to make musket balls.[114]

British officials in North America sent copies of the Declaration to Great Britain.[115] It was published in British newspapers beginning in mid-August; translations appeared in European newspapers soon after.[116] The North ministry did not give an official answer to the Declaration, but instead secretly commissioned pamphleteer John Lind to publish a response, which was entitled Answer to the Declaration of the American Congress. [117] Thomas Hutchinson, the former royal governor of Massachusetts, also published a rebuttal.[118] These pamphlets challenged various aspects of the Declaration. Hutchinson argued that the American Revolution was the work of a few conspirators who wanted independence from the outset, and who had finally achieved it by inducing otherwise loyal colonists to rebel.[119] Lind's pamphlet included an anonymous attack on the concept of natural rights written by Jeremy Bentham, an argument he would repeat during the French Revolution.[120] Both pamphlets asked how slave owners in Congress could proclaim that "all men are created equal" without then freeing their own slaves.[121]
MagicSanta
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Oh $@#$, we forgot to tell England we were splitting off!
Josh Riel
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I sent them an e-mail a long time ago, if they didn't open it, it's their fault.
Magic is doing improbable things with odd items that, under normal circumstances, would be unnessecary and quite often undesirable.
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