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fortasse
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What do you think is the best collection of close-up magic available in book form (including multiple volumes in a set). For me, I think it comes down to Pallbearers and Apocalypse, both of them periodicals that have been collected and published in book-form. Would be interested in what others think. By "best", I mean the collection that is best in terms of the originality, diversity, clarity, and practicality of the tricks presented.

Fortasse
tabman
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How about the bound Phoenix from Bruce Elliot?

-=tabman
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

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lint
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Pallbearer has gorgeous graphics throughout. I love flipping through it. As far as the best collection...I'd have to think a bit. Tarbell still holds up really well.
"There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip..." -English Proverb
Josh the Superfluous
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Of course it depends on what you already know. But...

I'll go with Tarbell. Any working pro could adapt several solid shows from it.
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Mobius303
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The Collected Almanac has a lot of material that I use regularly.

Apocalypse also has a great amount of material that is useable.

The Fulves magazines have a lot of material too....it is a tough decision.

For basics and a great foundation in magic both the Tabell course and Mark Wilson course of magic are excellent.

Mobius
kentfgunn
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Who needs a compendium?

Stars of Magic

The Dai Vernon Book of Magic

Either one will provide you all the close up magic you'd ever really need.

Toss in Close-Up Card Magic and you've got the three books that comprised my entire working bag-o-tricks for many a year.
DGillam
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The "Art of Close-up Magic" by Lewis Ganson in 2 volumes is is a wonderfully diverse collection of mostly non-card magic that was published in the "Gen". Of course the "Gen" is available in digital format from Lybrary.com too.
tabman
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Quote:
On 2009-07-05 23:25, DGillam wrote:
The "Art of Close-up Magic" by Lewis Ganson in 2 volumes is is a wonderfully diverse collection of mostly non-card magic that was published in the "Gen".


Totally agree with you on this. I found a bunch of ideas in them and even based the Tabman Casino Chip Stack on the routine contained in those books. Good choice.

-=tabman
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

http://Sefalaljia.com
Bill Palmer
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I agree with everything that has been listed so far. I would add the following:

The New Modern Coin Magic by J.B. Bobo
Classic Secrets of Magic by Bruce Elliott

It's really difficult to find "the best" single book on close-up magic. There are several very good ones.
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Lawrence O
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Kaplan's Fine Art of Magic is receiving less credit than it actually deserve.

For the ones who like compendiums, The Sphinx from Lybrary.com is also invaluable (costly but worth it).
There are cups and balls routines there (amongst many, many other splendid things) which are totally forgotten when they were supplying splendid ideas.

In French, Jules Dhotel's mammoth work contains almost everything which got reinvented, except for the cups and balls: it's like a Tarbell on steroïds.
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snape
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Lawrence O, I am not familiar with Jules Dhotel's work. Do you maybe have some bibliographical references?

Thanks.
Bill Palmer
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As far as I know, the only Dhotel book that is available in English is Magic with Small Apparatus, V 1. It's an excellent book.

The Kaplan book is also very good.

I met Kaplan when I was doing a lecture in West Hollywood, Florida. I was working at the Largo Renaissance Festival, and went across the state during the week to do this lecture. As I faced the audience, I realized that most of them were twice my age (at the time). One of my pieces was the Bill in the Lemon, based on the Kaplan version in his book. Thankfully, I credited the source. He came up after the lecture and introduced himself. He liked my version.
"The Swatter"

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My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
tabman
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Quote:
On 2009-07-06 15:25, Bill Palmer wrote:...I met Kaplan when I was doing a lecture in West Hollywood, Florida...One of my pieces was the Bill in the Lemon, based on the Kaplan version in his book. Thankfully, I credited the source. He came up after the lecture and introduced himself. He liked my version.


You just never know who's sitting next to you on a plane or who's in the audience.

That's a great story and a good lesson too.

-=tabman
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

http://Sefalaljia.com
lint
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Quote:
On 2009-07-06 02:26, Lawrence O wrote:
Kaplan's Fine Art of Magic is receiving less credit than it actually deserve.

For the ones who like compendiums, The Sphinx from Lybrary.com is also invaluable (costly but worth it).
There are cups and balls routines there (amongst many, many other splendid things) which are totally forgotten when they were supplying splendid ideas.

In French, Jules Dhotel's mammoth work contains almost everything which got reinvented, except for the cups and balls: it's like a Tarbell on steroïds.


Ettiene,
Did any of Dhotel's other books get translated? I love his Vol. 1.

-todd
"There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip..." -English Proverb
Jeff Dial
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Jerry Camero told the story of doing magic and someone coming up to advise him he was doing the Zarrow shuffle incorrectly. Yep, Jerry got some private tutoring from Herb Zarrow.
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Lawrence O
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The vol 1 of Magic with Small Apparatus was the first step of a huge work and no additional translations of Jules Dhotel were done (to my knowledge). There appeared, amongst other things the Schneider/Dingle pick up move for matrix when both were still in diapers if even born (and Dhotel never claimed it to be his).

My personal relationship with Kaplan occurred when Andy Greget mentioned to him that his work had been leather bound magnificently. I exchanged him his personal copy of The Fine Art Of Magic for my splendidly leather bound copies in English and in French (grey leather with feathery hand painted paper). Then we talked and he very modestly explained that most of the effects in his book were from Samuel Leo Horowitz.

Quote:
You just never know who's sitting next to you on a plane

This is very true. Let me tell you a little story. Back in February 1985 I was living in Monaco. I had to go to New York for business so I'm sitting in the Concord and there is an older gentleman next to me. As usual I don't like talking to people in a plane as they generally brag about their position, their income and/or their highly placed relationships. After take off, the hostess serves caviar (good old times) and the person next to me greats me in Russian. I return the compliment in Russian and the person starts talking to me in that language forcing me to admit that I had delivered him at least 50% of my knowledge of Russian at once. After laughing, the old gentleman asks me what I'm doing and, unwilling to talk business, I tell him that I'm a magician. One thing leading to another he asks me to show him a trick and I perform a Chink A Chink with the sugar lumps. For courtesy sake, I asked him what he was doing and he told me that he was a musician. As I was expressing some doubts, he told me that he would be giving a concert in Monaco for the Prince in July and that if I would perform magic for him for one afternoon, he would play privately for me for one afternoon. At the time I didn't know anything about music and I thought that it would be a good opportunity to be less ignorant... that is if the old gentleman was not a liar and (in that case) if he would remember it.
Time goes by, I forget about the whole thing and in July I receive a call in my office. It was the old gentleman who's name I could not really remember but he had told me his nickname. Anyhow, I go to the Palace of the Princes of Monaco where he had told me that he would leave a message for the guards at the door.
The guards take me to his suite in the palace and I do tricks for him for two hours and then he played the cello just for me during three hours, rehearsing his concert. That's how I met Slava Rostropovich, how we became friends and how I became a little less ignorant about music.
Magic is the art of proving impossible things in parallel dimensions that can't be reached
Pete Biro
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Wow... so great to have that experience. I had something similar in Monaco with world driving champion, Jackie Stewart. I won't go into it but it was a thrill of my life.
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Ethan Orr
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Great story Lawrence. Just goes to show the impression magic leaves on people and the places it can take you.
tabman
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Once Eli Nelson (steel player for UBC) and I met Tiny Boyles, the bounty hunter, on a flight from LA to Chicago. We were up for two days after that.

-=tabman
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

http://Sefalaljia.com
snape
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What are Dhotel's books in French?

Thanks.
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