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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Street Magic » » Strong magic on street comes with its Impromptu Nature... (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

HusssKarson
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I've recently learned an impromptu borrowed coin transpo that is really visual from another thread discussion in the Café. It is one of the effects that got me the most crazy reaction from and led me to think about the elements that create strong magic. I think one of the most important elements is the nature of impromptu-ness. Without the packaging of stage, lights, music, and other things, spectators are not expecting to see impossibilities. When something unexpected comes that they can visually see as the proof of impossibility, perhaps with even objects borrowed from them, they go nuts... I don't see much discussion on the elements that makes strong street magic. Perhaps you guys can share some opinions?

If you guys are interested in seeing the coin effect that I talked about, it's at http://www.smproductionz.com , the second video down.

Huss
Michael Peterson
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I went to see it, and all I saw were card tricks.


Mike
ESJohn
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Unfortunately, I couldn't see it either.
Jaz
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I agree that doing magic that is or appears to be impromptu, unstaged and with common looking or borrowed things may perhaps be the strongest form of magic.

When Blaine strolled the streets on his first show, he did just that. OK, there were a couple of card tricks, but mostly not.

To my thinking, there is a time and place for cards and, unless you're in magician mode, then the street isn't the place. A regular person wouldn't likely be carrying a deck everywhere, IMO.
pearljamjeff
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Blaine's first special was MOSTLY card tricks. Trust me, I taped it and still watch it over and over to this day. Yup, I'm a dork.
Jeff Travilla - Author of "The Extractor." I work in advertising and marketing now. If you are a professional worker and need marketing help, feel free to contact my company. JCM Media Group.
Jaz
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Quote:
On 2009-08-04 17:06, pearljamjeff wrote:
Blaine's first special was MOSTLY card tricks. Trust me, I taped it and still watch it over and over to this day. Yup, I'm a dork.


My mistake. It's been a while.
pearljamjeff
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Hey, maybe that says something, though? You remember the non-card effects better... Something to think about perhaps...
Jeff Travilla - Author of "The Extractor." I work in advertising and marketing now. If you are a professional worker and need marketing help, feel free to contact my company. JCM Media Group.
Attan
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Interesting topic. I guess it has to do with how much you exceed the expectations of your audience. For me, impromtu isn't really important. What is important is that the audience THINKS that it is impromptu, but I guess that's what you meant.

I don't think a deck of cards are the problem. People have seen PEOPLE do card tricks. Normal people like their friends, so cards are like the laymens magic tool. I guess that's why I can stretch myself to use cards. Everything else that is associated with actual magicians, like rope, linking rings, anvelopes, suspicious-looking-box, etc. and the audience is ready to see a good magician do his work.

I think a really big part of the reaction is depending on how the audience is set up. I don't know exactly where the balance is yet and would love to hear more about this from someone with more experience. Also, any books on the topic would be nice.

Good topic, would love to see it grow!

Jonatan
blu tiger
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On 2009-08-04 16:38, Jaz wrote:
To my thinking, there is a time and place for cards and, unless you're in magician mode, then the street isn't the place. A regular person wouldn't likely be carrying a deck everywhere, IMO.


I strictly do card tricks; that's just my love. Cards can be impromptu with street magic...especially when you let the spectator inspect & shuffle the deck first, and then do an impromptu card trick, IMO.
stijnhommes
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Quote:
On 2009-07-24 00:20, HusssKarson wrote:
I've recently learned an impromptu borrowed coin transpo that is really visual from another thread discussion in the Café. It is one of the effects that got me the most crazy reaction from and led me to think about the elements that create strong magic. I think one of the most important elements is the nature of impromptu-ness. Without the packaging of stage, lights, music, and other things, spectators are not expecting to see impossibilities. When something unexpected comes that they can visually see as the proof of impossibility, perhaps with even objects borrowed from them, they go nuts... I don't see much discussion on the elements that makes strong street magic. Perhaps you guys can share some opinions?

If you guys are interested in seeing the coin effect that I talked about, it's at http://www.smproductionz.com , the second video down.

Huss
That's funny. If I remember correctly that's exactly what Darwin Ortiz called good magic in his book Designing Miracles - impossibilities. Prepared or trick props are one of the first solutions spectators think of when you present them with something they consider impossible. If the props are normal and you also manage to exclude things like time and proximity between method and effect you have something they can't explain even if they wanted to.
MarvinWang
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Quote:
On 2009-11-25 08:21, MacGyverMagic wrote:
Quote:
On 2009-07-24 00:20, HusssKarson wrote:
I've recently learned an impromptu borrowed coin transpo that is really visual from another thread discussion in the Caf? It is one of the effects that got me the most crazy reaction from and led me to think about the elements that create strong magic. I think one of the most important elements is the nature of impromptu-ness. Without the packaging of stage, lights, music, and other things, spectators are not expecting to see impossibilities. When something unexpected comes that they can visually see as the proof of impossibility, perhaps with even objects borrowed from them, they go nuts... I don't see much discussion on the elements that makes strong street magic. Perhaps you guys can share some opinions?

If you guys are interested in seeing the coin effect that I talked about, it's at http://www.smproductionz.com , the second video down.

Huss
That's funny. If I remember correctly that's exactly what Darwin Ortiz called good magic in his book Designing Miracles - impossibilities. Prepared or trick props are one of the first solutions spectators think of when you present them with something they consider impossible. If the props are normal and you also manage to exclude things like time and proximity between method and effect you have something they can't explain even if they wanted to.


agreed!!
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