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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Ever so sleightly » » Digital camera - best picture resolution for upload (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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fortasse
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I want to upload some still pictures of my magic collection to Photobucket? What is the best picture resolution to use when taking the pictures and when uploading them..............and same question re: video clips. Does it make any difference how long the clips are?
Thanks
Fortasse
Bill Palmer
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PM'ed you.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
fortasse
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Bill has given me an excellent crash-course in how to approach this. Thanks a million!

Fortasse
cupsandballsmagic
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Bill's the man for this, his site is huge and very graphic intensive. My pics are usually trial and error!
Pete Biro
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I'd like to see Bill's recommendations.
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Donnie Buckley
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I'm with Pete. I'd like to see Bill's recommendations too.
Learn the form, but seek the formless. Learn it all, then forget it all. Learn the way, then find your own way. Rings-N-Things
sdmagic
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How about a quick post Bill? Lots of folks interested!
tabman
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What I've always done is to shoot highest resolution I can. In my case 10.5 MP then I size down by pixels for the size I want to show on screen - 400 to 800 pixels on height. I sharpen and compress about 30% b4 uploading so it will load pretty fast.

Here's one 429 pixels high, sparpened and compressed.

Image


I'd love to hear from Bill and Pete. That would be great.

-=tabman
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

http://Sefalaljia.com
lint
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Wow can't wait to see Sean's pictures.
"There's many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip..." -English Proverb
RobertSmith
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For taking pictures I always shoot on the highest available setting.

Then for web I downsize to 72dpi. I'm not familiar with any need for high resolution online but certainly it's at your discretion.

Robert
Bill Palmer
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Here's what I sent fortasse:

The picture resolution will become a moot point, because you will need to set the photos up measuring them by pixel width. In other words, you will upload a photo that is, for example 640 x 480. That's 640 pixels by 480 pixels. Usually, resolution is given in terms of dpi or ppi. This is irrelevant if you don't have a measurement, such as 3 inches by 5 inches.

A lot of print companies tell you to upload photos at 300 dpi. If they don't set a size, then this means nothing. On screen, a photo that is 3 inches by 5 inches at 300 dpi will display exactly the same as a photo that is 1.5 inches by 2.5 inches at 600 dpi or 6 inches by 10 inches by 150 dpi.

Most of the photos on the museum web site follow these sizes. Regular cup set photos are 450 pixels wide. Jumbo cup set photos are 500 pixels wide. Mini cup and shell game set photos are 400 pixels wide, etc. The height is determined by how I crop the photo. How these display at the monitor depends entirely upon how the person looking at the photo has his/her monitor set up.

For example, let's say you post your photos at 640 by 480 (ppi). This is a very common size. A person with a very old monitor whose display size is 640 x 480 will see this as a full screen photo. A person with a bit more modern monitor, displaying at 1280 x 960 will see this as 1/4 of a screen.

My personal display is 1024 x 768 because I am very nearsighted. I use a 20 inch monitor, so I can see what I type!

I hope this helps you figure out what you want to do.

My recommendation -- just make the photos sharp, and keep them below 1000 pixels wide and 600 pixels high. Almost anyone can display a photo that size without scrolling the picture.

Additional notes:

Robert has close to the right idea. When I shoot photos for the museum, I shoot at the highest resolution I have. Then I import them into Paintshop Pro, crop them, adjust the contrast, brightness and sharpness, if necessary, and I size them as indicated above. You don't need to worry about whether you are set for 300 dpi or 72 dpi, because the display settings of the monitor the pictures are viewed upon will determine, in the final analysis, how the pictures look and what size they are.

Print is an entirely different breed of cat. If you are submitting a book to be printed, the bookmaker (that's what they call themeselves!) will tell you several things:

1) the printer driver they use on their presses
2) the resolution you should use -- some prefer 600 dpi for black and white, 300 dpi for color. Others prefer higher resolution than that.
3) the graphics program you should use to make the files look right for their printer
4) how to set the parameters of your page composition program
5) how to set Adobe Acrobat Distiller to get the kind of PDF files they need.

I used Sheridan Books to do Final Curtain and Sheherazade. They were great to work with, because they knew I was a noob, and they put up with my stupid questions. As a result, the books came out looking very good.

Regarding the print settings for the photos, though, (requirement #2), this presumes that you have actually placed the photos in their finished sizes into the text. So they will be sized and ready to go.

None of that is relevant for publication on the web, though.

BTW, I keep all of my original files, in case I need to do something to them.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
Pete Biro
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Thanks, makes sense.
STAY TOONED... @ www.pete-biro.com
Bill Palmer
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When I took on the task of editing and publishing the English version of Sheherazade, I was very confused about how picture resolution worked. I have a friend who has been working with Pagemaker and Photoshop since version 1.0, so I told him I wanted to be eddicated on how these programs worked.

I took him to lunch, and he gave me the entire rundown. It all makes sense, once you understand that there are several parameters that you must take into consideration. Monitors are really pretty simple. It's when you go to print that it gets complicated.
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
tabman
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Quote:
On 2009-07-27 21:40, Bill Palmer wrote:...It's when you go to print that it gets complicated.


Easy for you to say!! Smile

-=tabman
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

http://Sefalaljia.com
marty.sasaki
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As Bill says, it all depends on the end product. If it's the web, then a reasonable target is 640x480 pixels or so. If you want to have people print it out, then I would go with the highest resolution that comes out of your process. It doesn't have to be that high. I've seen several beautiful prints that were 11x17 shot at 6MP.

If the photos are for the web, don't spend too much time "making it perfect". Chances are the person viewing your images will have an uncalibrated monitor adjusted to be bright and contrasty rather than accurate and life-like.

I don't know what the limits of video are on Photobucket. Probably best to ask on their forums for this sort of information.
Marty Sasaki
Arlington, Massachusetts, USA

Standard disclaimer: I'm just a hobbyist who enjoys occasionally mystifying friends and family, so my opinions should be viewed with this in mind.
BCS
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Bill… Thanks for sharing the photo tips. I just purchased a close up photography kit that I can’t wait to try. It came with a tripod, a box like structure that one can change different colored backgrounds (included), light diffusers for the sides and 2 lights on stands.

Thanks,
Bruce
fortasse
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Bruce : I just invested in one of those sets as well............but the box is a bit smallish, I find. OK for single items or a small group of things but not for bigger collections.


Fortasse
tabman
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What size light tent is it? The one I use is 36" and even it seems small sometimes.

-=tab
...Your professional woodworking and "tender" loving care in the products you make, make the wait worthwhile. Thanks for all you do...

http://Sefalaljia.com
Donnie Buckley
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I went with Table Top Studios (http://store.tabletopstudio-store.com/index.html). Tab, they have a 55" tent.

Bill you outline on resolution is pretty good. Where I run into problems is with the actual shot. Shooting shiny reflective polished/chromed objects is a tall order for a guy who isn't a pro photog.
Learn the form, but seek the formless. Learn it all, then forget it all. Learn the way, then find your own way. Rings-N-Things
Bill Palmer
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I'm not a pro photographer, either. I have had real problems, especially with silver cups. They reflect the background and the sides like mirrors. There is a book called Light Science and Magic that has a lot of good info, but I still haven't figured out the solution. Dulling spray is an option, but it is pretty messy. It's water soluble, so it supposedly won't hurt the metal cups.

I have a 4 ft. Last O Lite cube. But the big problem with it is figuring out how to shoot from 3 meters away. I have used a light tunnel made from king size bed sheeting. That seems to be a good solution. I have had other suggestions that I will try when I set my photo gear back up.

I need a proper studio!
"The Swatter"

Founder of CODBAMMC

My Chickasaw name is "Throws Money at Cups."

www.cupsandballsmuseum.com
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