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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Paper money madness! » » Cutting Mis-Made Bills from a Sheet (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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jazzy snazzy
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Invest in a plastic cutting mat, x-acto knife with VERY SHARP #11 blades, a "non-photo blue" or light blue pencil, an Artgum eraser and a metal yardstick or straight edge.

Use a flat, solid surface such as the floor.
Lightly mark out the desired cuts using any regular bill as a template. You only need to mark the top and bottom and each side of the sheet as long as you can keep it lined up straight.
The light blue pencil will erase easily with an artgum eraser.

Cut the long dimensions first using your knee or an assistant to hold the straight edge down firmly, leaving the top and bottom uncut so the sheet stays together.

Make sure the blade is tight against the straight edge as you make the cut.
Use the regular bill to check your position for exact size before each cut.

Rotate the sheet and make the horizontal cuts the same way.

Voila!

Some people actually use this stuff for gift-wrap paper.
"The secret of life is to look good from a distance."
-Charles Schulz
Sammy J.
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Quote:
On 2010-04-16 21:32, daffydoug wrote:

I know this may be off topic, but WHERE did you purchase them? And were they expensive?


http://www.moneyfactorystore.gov/
Sammy J. Teague
Steven Keyl
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Quote:
On 2009-08-29 22:38, Sammy J. wrote:
Quote:
On 2009-08-26 16:06, defconskylude wrote:
I just picked up a $5.00 mismade bill and a $1.00 mismade bill for $44.00

Geez!


That's pretty much the going rate. If you don't plan to give them away then these will last you for a few years. Overall, a good investment!

Sammy


I've got several mismade $1's left over from the last sheet I cut. If anyone wants one for $10 send me a PM. I find that I use the same bill over and over so I don't really go through them very fast.
Steven Keyl - The Human Whisperer!

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"If you ever find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause, and reflect." --Mark Twain
daffydoug
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Thanks for the link. Whew! Looks like you are paying a couple bucks for each individual bill!
The difficult must become easy, the easy beautiful and the beautiful magical.
tommeepickles
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You could also tear them carefully into mismade bills and then it becomes a torn and mismade miracle with torn edges on the outside and borders on the inside. After the switch it will look like the same bill and you can have them sign it before you make your magic moment.
Steven Keyl
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The torn edges idea is excellent! It doesn't fit with my current presentation but it's still a great idea.
Steven Keyl - The Human Whisperer!

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"If you ever find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause, and reflect." --Mark Twain
Mithrandir
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I know this sounds dumb , and correct me if I'm wrong but , out of a sheet of 32 you can only get 24 mismade bills .... Right ?

Either way it's still economically better than buying one mismade bill at a time .
David P
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Right, you get 24 Mis-Made Bills out of a sheet of 32. Cost from mint is $55. The sheet is 4 bills across X 8 down. After cutting you will have 16 loose left and righthalves that could be used as parts for a torn and restored. I don't know if this would be legal, but you might tape these halves together and then use as cash ($8).
MikeHall
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Actually 21 mismade bills from a sheet of thirty two.
David P
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You are right Mike, 21 not 24. I wasn't thinking about the cuttings off the bottom and top of the sheet. My mistake.
Bob Johnston
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Quote:
On 2010-05-11 10:14, David P wrote:
Right, you get 24 Mis-Made Bills out of a sheet of 32. Cost from mint is $55. The sheet is 4 bills across X 8 down. After cutting you will have 16 loose left and righthalves that could be used as parts for a torn and restored. I don't know if this would be legal, but you might tape these halves together and then use as cash ($8).

Taping those trim pieces together is a great idea, especially if you’re big on ripping people off. The person, who finally decides to take the bill to a bank for a nice crisp new bill, will find that the bill is not legal.

The first thing a bank teller (that’s awake) will do is check the serial numbers of the bill and he/she will find they do not match. At that point, they keep the bill.

Bob
David P
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I'm not big on "ripping people off". For a few $1s ? I was just wondering if a bank would take them. I don't know for sure, but understand that you can tape a torn bill together, even a severely mangled one or you can return a partial bill and a bank will honor that. Does anyone here know? My next project involves a whole sheet of $100's for Mis Mades.
rjthomp
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The official standard is that to be reimbursed you need to have "clearly more than half of the bill". So you would not be able to redeem these bills... Taping a bill with different serial numbers on each half would be a no-no...

Se the following:
http://www.bep.treas.gov/uscurrency/damagedcurrency.html
David P
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Rjthomp - Thanks for the US treasury damaged bill redemption information. Good to know the scoop. I was kidding about the 100's. Ones are more my speed.
rjthomp
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The official standard is that to be reimbursed you need to have "clearly more than half of the bill". So you would not be able to redeem these bills... Taping a bill with different serial numbers on each half would be a no-no...

Se the following:
http://www.bep.treas.gov/uscurrency/damagedcurrency.html
chennell
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I live in the UK and have always wanted to do this effect, the only problem is I cannot find anyone who makes or sells the gimmick in a £10 note. If anyone could point me in the right dirrection with a PM I'd really apriciate it.
writeall
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Just curious. When you do a give away with mis-made, do you bother to make the serial numbers the same or just don't worry about it?
writeall
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I had another look at an uncut sheet. The 'erasing' method wouldn't work, so matching serial numbers is out. I assumed they would be sequential on the diagonal, which is wrong.
Tonylew
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AFter examining the options, I have decided that the T square/Exacto Knife approach seems to be the best way to go. I checked with my local Staples Office Supply and found that their cutter only takes up to a 24" sheet which is 1/2 " less than needed. If we could have squeezed the bill sheet in, they would have charged me $12 for the job. Framing stores wanted at least $25.

I already have a cutting board and found a choice of two 48" T squares at Home Depot for under $12 each. The Exacto knife can be picked up for a couple of bucks. If you would like to just give a Mismade Bill away (about $2.62 each if you make your own) here's a non-magical way of doing it. Tell the recipient that while you were making a smoothie the other day, you dropped a dollar bill in the blender by mistake,

IMO this is a humorous way of explaining the existence of the bill. I use these bills occasionally as tips to people who are not allowed to take cash, such as casino pit bosses. Very often they do not have the time to watch me do a bill switch, but they love the novelty of the mismade bills.

FWIW I once gave one of those excellent $1000 fake bills to a shift manager in Reno and got comped for a very nice room in return, not a bad return for a twenty-five cent investment!

Here is a way to get some mileage from the two long edge pieces that are left after you create the mismade bills. Cut off a section which contains two halves. Then approach anybody who has access to a cash drawer and ask if he/her can give you change for two half dollars. I Have gotten some good laughs from doing this. This usually brings on such questions as "Is that real money?" or "How did you get that?" Of course you would want to make sure that the person is not busy when you try the gag.

Right after it was published in the late 1970's, I purchased "The Hundred Dollar Bill Switch" by Mike Kozlowski. I have always done this effect *without the thumb tip* following the suggestion of Mike in the next to last page of the manuscript.

I was fortunate to make the acquaintance of the late, great Larry Jennings when I visited Lake Tahoe. While we were chatting at a bar, I had the nerve to show the effect to Larry. He reacted by saying, "That's very nice but you're leaving out an essential move." He then proceeded to show me how to display both sides of the bill in a very natural way before and after the switch. Several of my fellow magicians have found this to be very impressive.

About 15 years ago, I went from the $100 bill switch to the mismade bill, using the inside/out presentation. This gets just as strong a reaction as the original while saving me from tying up a $100 bill.

Now I have come up with a new idea. While the $100 bill gets more common as the dollar gets ever weaker, the public in general erroneously feels that the $2 bill is quite rare. Therefore, I am about to purchase a sheet of thirty-two $2 bills ($90 postpaid) from the Bureau of Engraving to use for making a set of mismade $2 bills.

I can then patter that the "rare" $2 bill has magical properties, one of which is that it can be turned inside/out. There is also an additional advantage to using the $2 bill. Since very few people have one of these in their possession, I can now start out with my own perfectly creased bill.

I also hope to be able to sell enough of the mismade $2 bills to recover my $90 investment.
MT
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Good idea. You can make your own mismade bill. But if you only need one or two it might not be worth it to buy a whole sheet.
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