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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Make them come to me....help! (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

pbg739
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His is a cry for help from some of the big ones here...Kyle, Dean, Donald, Eric Paul, Jim Snack, and others who are the successful performers with the marketing game down pat.

After spending too much time chasing after my target market (festivals), how do I get the client to come to me?

I know Dean mentioned in a previous post that he angles his website so that he controls his market's eyes, not a random person looking for "magician" in Google.

I am reading Dan Kennedy and he preaches marketing to the affluent and having them come to you, change the experience and unlinking price from product, but without tipping whole methods, maybe someone can shed some light on how to get them to come to me, and maybe an example of how to be elusive and in limited demand, or whether I should link myself towards high end magazines, products to get an association.


Any help is VERY appreciated!
jackturk
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Your first task is to really nail down who you're targetingand understand that customer thoroughly. Get inside their heads, their hearts, their skin, their daily lives. Ask yourself lots of questions about them, such as?

-- Where do they live?
-- What do they do for a living?
-- How much do they make?
-- What kind of disposable income do they have?
-- How is the economy affecting them today?
-- What problems are they facing that you can solve?
-- What stops them from calling you right now?
-- What keeps them awake at night?
-- If they could make one wish to change their life, what is it?

And on and on and on. You really need to know your prospect so well that when they do discover you -- either through an ad you placed, or word of mouth, or the internet, or a letter you send -- that the first thing they see from you appears to catch them right in mid-thought!

It's clear from your materials that you totally get where they're at right at that moment in time, you understand the challenges they face, you are exactly the expert they need, and you've got the track record and social proof to back up everything you say.

So if it's festivals, really get inside the life of the man or woman who's in charge of booking the entertainment. Find out everything you can about them. How much they make (if they get paid at all)? How hard they have to work. When their deadlines are. The legal issues they face. Financial challenges. What scares them about entertainers. All this stuff. Ask and find answers to all these kinds of questions.

That's the very first step.

--Jack
"59 Ways To Recession Proof Your Entertainment Business -- FREE!"
http://www.GetLeadsLikeCrazy.com

"How To Make $25,000 a Year Doing Birthday Parties Part-Time"
http://www.magicmarketingcenter.com/birthdayPT
Bill Nuvo
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Quote:
On 2009-10-14 02:50, pbg739 wrote:

After spending too much time chasing after my target market (festivals), how do I get the client to come to me?



That's how you do it. You go after them. Why wait for them to come to you? I simply pick the clients I want and go after them (using the ideas posted by Jack above and more).

Quick note: Not all festivals are created equal. Some have paid organizers, some do not. Some are organized and efficient, some are not. With that in mind you should be promoting to festivals at least 6 months ahead of time, if not more. Sure you can still get some with a month's notice, but that is harder to do and a lot more hassle. Save them time and hassle by arranging everything many many months ahead of time. This allows them to focus on other areas of the festival that need tending to. As Kyle always says..."be a solutions provider"
pbg739
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Jack,

Thank you very much for the thorough breakdown. It appears that my work is indeed cut out for me. Thank you for the push in the right direction!

Bill, I do have the planning calendar with at least 6 months advance planning. Thank you for the quick note.

Once again, thank you both for the sound advice!
C Christian
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I hate to say this but I think you also have to Grab them by the shorts and shock them with your talent. By that I mean, you really should have a great act and video demo. You can do all those things written above and they may call you, heck they may even hire you. But will they keep your number for future festival shows only if you can deliver the goods, my friend.
On a side note an agent or booker will not hire a person that has a video demo that in the demo, there's a banner behind the performer that says, "new talent night" it screams to him or her AMATEUR, though you may not be.
Also never have an interactive video 1st on your site. Unless you’re David Copperfield, the booker is going to click the 1st reel that they see and he or she will be ticked that he or she now has to get up off the chair and grab a deck of cards and fallow along and then maybe hire you. Sadly in today’s world it doesn't happen that way. They want to see what you can do and if it impresses them, they may take a chance on you. I'd say put that video at the bottom of your list or somewhere else for people to enjoy. But for bookers of festivals they will pass that video every time.
At least for me it boils down to what Steve Martin says and John Carney preaches all the time.
You have to be so great at what you do that they cannot ignore you.
Hope this helps
Cheers Chris
Donald Dunphy
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Keep in mind, that aside from phone calls, mailings, and visits, that another option you have to connect with festivals is through appropriate trade shows.

Dean Hankey and Jim Snack have discussed this in their materials.

Not just being at their trade shows, but specifically what you do when there.

It's about creating relationships.

It also might be important to keep in mind that it might take years to build some relationships.

- Donald

P.S. To touch on your "marketing to the affluent" query. Two thoughts come to mind. Is your show, promotional materials, and all things about your business, a good fit / worthy of that type of customer? Are you sure that there are affluent festival customers out there, and can you identify them?
Donald Dunphy is a Victoria Magician, British Columbia, Canada.
pbg739
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Chris,

Thank you for the video placement suggestion, it will be fixed.

Donald, I deeply respect your opinion. Re: the affluent, I was told that Kennedy is the end all and be all of marketing and in searching for his work, that book was the only one I saw at B and N. I know it's a lazy move on my part, but if he is a great source, are there other books of his that would be more appropriate? The No BS wealth attraction for the entrepreneur?
RJE
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Along with some of the other fine points given in the thread, I'd like to add one word, reputation. You need to work the market until you have a reputation of being what they're looking for.

Magic acts are "a dime a dozen." People who hire them are approached by an endless stream of performers who want in the door. The hirers are directed to all types of web sites, promising all kinds of wonderful things. They receive all types of promo with all kinds of amazing things written on them along with colorful pictures and such. They hear all types of pitches. Sometimes the promises made in promotional material are fulfilled and sometimes they are empty. Unfortunately, wonderful promo does not always mean a wonderful act and there are a lot of potential clients out there that have been burned by that and are suspicious of what they see on your web site or read in your promo package. (A good promo package is always a good asset to have of course, but the prospective clients can be swamped with them.)

But, to become the act that they seek out, you have to first become a dominant factor in the market you are trying to get into. You have to establish a track record with them. You have to become a known name with them. You have to develop a reputation as the number one act to fill their needs because you always do a great job and impress them and the audiences. You have to become the act that they ask back year after year, the act that they rebook for next year as soon as you step off the stage this year.

When you can develop into that act, they will seek you out.

To begin, if it is festivals you want to do, you have to get your foot in the door and start doing as many as you can over as many years as you can. Market yourself as a festival entertainer when you approach them. Be prepared with testimonials and a bio specific to festivals. Build a base of happy clients that you return to work for year after year. This will open doors to other festivals.

Seek out festival organizations that have ready lists of all the festivals in your province or area that you wish to perform in for names and contact info. In Ontario, for example, the FEO (Festivals and Events Ontario).
Donald Dunphy
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Quote:
On 2009-10-14 12:07, pbg739 wrote:
Donald, I deeply respect your opinion. Re: the affluent, I was told that Kennedy is the end all and be all of marketing and in searching for his work, that book was the only one I saw at B and N. I know it's a lazy move on my part, but if he is a great source, are there other books of his that would be more appropriate? The No BS wealth attraction for the entrepreneur?


Keep in mind that I'm not a huge fan of Dan Kennedy. I have never bought one of his courses, and I find his personality a bit too grating. However, others might disagree with me, and that's fine.

Even though I'm not a huge fan, I have bought and read about 6 or so of his paperback books. He does offer some good information.

- Donald
Donald Dunphy is a Victoria Magician, British Columbia, Canada.
keithmagic
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PBG,

I wrote a little about this in my book on festivals a few years back, but I think it's worth repeating... Your marketing "technique" totally depends on the market you are targeting.

It's been my personal experience depending on WHAT festivals you are going after, the organizers are most likely bombarded with standard promo 24/7 with no follow up, rhyme, or reason. Why would they COME to you? They won't. They don't need to. So you have to get them good, quality, RELEVANT info, and then follow up and build a relationship.

I also need to stress that RELEVANT part. If you only knew how many guys send in promo for acts that are not made for an outdoor event hoping for work... (wow, sir, you have a nice picture of you and your Owen thin model sawing - but you want to work as a roving act... um.. ok?) but that's a different post for a different day.

Keith
Author of "The Festival Entertainer" The Professional Entertainer's Guide to Booking and Working Outdoor Fairs, Festivals, and Events.
Available at http://www.howtobookfestivals.com
Bill Nuvo
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Quote:
On 2009-10-14 13:41, keithmagic wrote:
PBG,

I wrote a little about this in my book on festivals a few years back, but I think it's worth repeating... Your marketing "technique" totally depends on the market you are targeting.

It's been my personal experience depending on WHAT festivals you are going after, the organizers are most likely bombarded with standard promo 24/7 with no follow up, rhyme, or reason. Why would they COME to you? They won't. They don't need to. So you have to get them good, quality, RELEVANT info, and then follow up and build a relationship.

I also need to stress that RELEVANT part. If you only knew how many guys send in promo for acts that are not made for an outdoor event hoping for work... (wow, sir, you have a nice picture of you and your Owen thin model sawing - but you want to work as a roving act... um.. ok?) but that's a different post for a different day.

Keith


So true Keith. As an organizer of 4 festivals myself, I can't tell you the amount of information that comes my way. A lot of it, to put it bluntly is useless in the fact that they have not done their research as to what is needed.

I can tell you that I rarely keep promo material as well as I know I'll get bombarded with another bunch of the same sort. There are certain people I do seek out (often those whom I worked with...I know it seems wrong, but as stated a million times before...magicians and juggler are a dime a dozen). Luckily I can sift through those who fit our criteria (which is not always being a top pro either...I do hire people of potential) and those who don't. Sometimes it's just a matter of we just don't need that type of act. This past year for the Windsor Buskerfest, we were short and I put some feelers out for water acts (anything to do with water...glass harmonicas, squirt guns, regurgitators, etc...) and I got a ton of email from people not even fitting that description. Those people who could not be bothered to read and know my problem and provide me with a solution were just deleted.
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