The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Table hoppers & party strollers » » how many different programs a night? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Chris Becker
View Profile
Veteran user
New York, NY
371 Posts

Profile of Chris Becker
Someone suggested having numerous 3 to 8 minute programs at your disposal when doing table hopping. Of course, this is necessary for repeat appearances at the same restaurant.

However, during one single table hopping session, should I perform different programs at different tables to prevent exposure (to former spectators watching again from their table) or boredom (of present spectators who've watched my show at another table)?

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Chris
- - -
<BR>Cards don't cheat people. People cheat people.
Thoughtreader
View Profile
Inner circle
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
1565 Posts

Profile of Thoughtreader
I always had two or three sets to pull from regularly but also learned a new effect (or had one that I already had in my arsenal but did not do it regularly) ready for my regulars that came each week. They came expecting a new effect and not a whole new set by that time anyway.

As for worry about others burning you, it is going to happen if they really want to but they really have to be intrusive in a restaurant setting in order to watch closely and so you really don't need to worry too much about it. Kind of the same situation at a trade show environment as if they want to return to watch again, they will. Just keep on plugging.

Also, when I was working for families and did balloon animals too, I learned a new one each week because the regular kids used to think up new ones all week long that they might stump me with and so it was another popular running gag to see if they could stump the magician with an animal I could not do from a single 260 modeling balloon.

It does keep one on their toes. Hope that helps,

PSIncerely Yours,
Paul Alberstat
Canada's Leading Mentalist
http://www.mindguy.com
AB StageCraft
http://www.mindguy.com/store
Scott F. Guinn
View Profile
Inner circle
"Great Scott!" aka "Palms of Putty" & "Poof Daddy G"
6581 Posts

Profile of Scott F. Guinn
My article on this subject addresses this.
I recommend a minimum of six sets--3 for tables with kids and three for those without them. These are my 1st, 2nd and 3rd time sets. If a family with kids comes in to see me, I can perform for them three times without repeating an effect. If just the parents come in, I do my first time adult set, etc. Thus, I can perform for the same people numerous times, doing 18-30 routines without ever repeating one or having to wrack my brain, trying to remember what I have or haven't done for them.

To answer your question here, it depends on whether the guests are repeats or not. Certainly, on any given evening, some will be and others will be first-timers.
"Love God, laugh more, spend more time with the ones you love, play with children, do good to those in need, and eat more ice cream. There is more to life than magic tricks." - Scott F. Guinn
My Lybrary Page
Matt Graves
View Profile
Special user
Huntsville, Alabama (USA)
504 Posts

Profile of Matt Graves
I have a question about routining in general here-especially for Mr. Guinn... how do you
"pace" the sets... like should your first be your most impressive stuff and then you relax on the second one or should they get better as you go along, or how do you think of that?

I've noticed in Garth Brooks's concerts (forgive me for once again bringing him into a magical discussion, but he is a great entertainer) and in David Copperfield's live show, it'll start off with something really spectacular and then immediately go to something far simpler and more laid-back, and then it'll start building from there.

I've never performed professionally, but if I ever do, I want to make it good for whoever is kind enough to watch...
Scott F. Guinn
View Profile
Inner circle
"Great Scott!" aka "Palms of Putty" & "Poof Daddy G"
6581 Posts

Profile of Scott F. Guinn
Serling,

First, Mr. Guinn is my dad. While I appreciate your respectful attitude, please feel free to call me Scott.

In answer to your question, it is difficult for me to say what anyone else should or should not do in this regard--particularly those I've never seen perform. Years ago, I took Mike Ammar's advice, and I went through all the effects I knew and rated them on a scale of 1-10. I threw out everything under an eight and never performed it again. I have kept this policy as I decide what new effects to add to my repertoire.

Therefore, ALL of my sets are very strong magically. However, I do feel that it is important that your first effect in particular is not something where the spectator has to do any work. This is especially true of those for whom you have never performed. In other words, don't start a set by asking an audience member to cut the deck into four piles, turn two face up, deal one pile face up onto the other two, take the last pile and shuffle it before thinking of a number between 10 and twenty and then adding the digits together and dividing by pi... well, you get the point.

My first routine in a set always eases into audience participation, so that they have a chance to size me up and to see that I'm good and won't embarrass them. I feel this is a good strategy regardless of your performing persona. The closer should have a really strong finish, with maybe a give away or permanently altered item that they can keep. Preferably, this item should have the restaurant's info, your info, or both.

This is the tack I've taken, and it has worked very successfully for me. I hope that answers your question.

Best wishes,
Scott
"Love God, laugh more, spend more time with the ones you love, play with children, do good to those in need, and eat more ice cream. There is more to life than magic tricks." - Scott F. Guinn
My Lybrary Page
DoctorAmazo
View Profile
Special user
Florida
643 Posts

Profile of DoctorAmazo
Great Scott, Scott! How in the world do you remember which set each repeat family is on?

"Lessee...these guys were last in two months ago...they are #2 adult and #3 w/kids."

I can't imagine keeping track of all the repeats, let alone the number of times and whether they had the kiddies along.

But then, I've never table-hopped, so I speak from complete ignorance...
J R Thomas
View Profile
Regular user
Champaign Illinois
138 Posts

Profile of J R Thomas
Dittos - Scott Guinn...

I found through trial and much error, sets created themselves. I started off with an opener.. usually Chicago Openers (Everhart,et. al.) The deck was set up for it when I approached the table. I had another effect I was getting a strong response from that required a set up of 2 gimmicked cards and did not disturb Chicago Openers. So, I set the two up together. I usually followed this with Lethal Tender and I'm gone.

I have used this opening set for years. I am good at remembering peoples faces. I make it a point to watch their expressions when I interact with them. That way when they come back I tend to remember them and go to a different set of effects.

I build sets of effects so they easily flow from one to the other. I try to avoid dead time. Pocket management and knowing your repoitoire (sp?) is essesntial. I carry a small flat leather packet holder with Lethal Tender with a supply of my business cards, Color Monte, B'wave and a bank id I use. I have a whole set right there.

I am also felxible though. Just because I have a set order and group of effects it does not mean I will not stray from it. It depends on the audience. It is important that a strolling magician is attentive to what he/she is dealing with. It's like going on a date. You don't treat every date the same. It is important to learn about them through interaction, observation and listening.

With repeat customers I often end up chatting with them for 5 minutes before I show them my new effect. They can be a wonderful resource if you gain their trust. It comes over time. I think you have to be genuinely interested in people if you are going to work the same restaruant over and over again.

It is important to anticipate repeat customers. Suppose they come in asking for
"you know... that trick where you change the card to a red one." You have to have another strong set to go to or in the case of the $100 bill switch you can change it to a mismade bill.

Like I said earlier when you are starting out, watch how the spectators respond to your effects. Practice in front of a mirror is fine, but it is nothing compared to the real world. So serling and chrisof get out there and give it a shot. You will be in for an education.

Yo... Doc-a-Mazo... I do not find remembering people and what I have done for them very difficult. Sometimes they will tell you. If the experience was good chances are you will remember them. If it was bad
..chances are you will remember them, especially if you are in the same setting, like a restaruant. If memory is a problem
...try Harry Lorayne. If you do have sets of effects it becomes even easier because chances are they will have reacted in some way to one of your strong effects and it will leave an imprint on your mind. Since you are writing with a lack of experience in the field I encourage you to get out there and try. Your perspective will change.
Those who hear not the music

Think the dancers mad
Scott F. Guinn
View Profile
Inner circle
"Great Scott!" aka "Palms of Putty" & "Poof Daddy G"
6581 Posts

Profile of Scott F. Guinn
Quote:
On 2002-04-24 08:32, DoctorAmazo wrote:
Great Scott, Scott! How in the world do you remember which set each repeat family is on?

"Lessee...these guys were last in two months ago...they are #2 adult and #3 w/kids."

I can't imagine keeping track of all the repeats, let alone the number of times and whether they had the kiddies along.

But then, I've never table-hopped, so I speak from complete ignorance...
Simple--I ASK them! "Have you had me perform before at your table? How many times?"
"Love God, laugh more, spend more time with the ones you love, play with children, do good to those in need, and eat more ice cream. There is more to life than magic tricks." - Scott F. Guinn
My Lybrary Page
J R Thomas
View Profile
Regular user
Champaign Illinois
138 Posts

Profile of J R Thomas
Yo...Mazmo...I think he has you there.
Those who hear not the music

Think the dancers mad
Magique Hands
View Profile
Loyal user
Lincoln, NE.
247 Posts

Profile of Magique Hands
I am new to this forum, but have been a restaurant performer going on nearly 9 years now.

I truly agree with Scott. Having a six-set list pretty much covers all the bases. I do save "Special Effects" just for my repeat guests. This way, they get to see magic they haven't before.

When my repeat guests bring their friends into the restaurant to see me, they always say, "Do the one with the..." So, I do oblige them, but first, I show a few other things, then close with the requested effect. I believe this builds the suspense quite well. Remember... keep the audience wanting more.
"If you go around sprinkling Woofle Dust on everything... people will think 'My... What an odd character." www.magicmafia.com
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Table hoppers & party strollers » » how many different programs a night? (0 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2019 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.15 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL